Quantum communications and quantum imaging are emerging technologies that promise great benefits beyond classical communications and classical imaging - as well as great challenges. The objective of this conference is to provide a forum for scientists, researchers, and system developers in both fields and encourage technology exchange between the quantum communication and quantum imaging research communities. Papers are solicited on the following and related topics:

QUANTUM COMMUNICATIONS, QUANTUM INTERNET, AND QUANTUM INFORMATION

QUANTUM IMAGING AND QUANTUM SENSING
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In progress – view active session
Conference 12238

Quantum Communications and Quantum Imaging XX

21 - 22 August 2022 | Conv. Ctr. Room 14A
View Session ∨
  • 1: Quantum Imaging and Quantum Sensing
  • 2: Quantum Technology and Quantum Information Science I
  • Sunday Evening Plenary
  • Nanoscience + Engineering Plenary
  • 3: Quantum Technology and Quantum Information Science II
  • 4: Quantum Networking and Quantum Communications
  • Poster Session
Information

Timing will be finalized in early August


POST-DEADLINE ABSTRACT SUBMISSIONS DUE 5-July

Call for Papers Flyer
Session 1: Quantum Imaging and Quantum Sensing
21 August 2022 • 8:15 AM - 12:35 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 14A
12238-1
Author(s): Philip R. Hemmer, Texas A&M Univ. (United States)
21 August 2022 • 8:15 AM - 8:45 AM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 14A
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Fluorescent nanoparticles can probe biological processes on the nanoscale, sometimes with the potential for quantum-enhanced sensing. I will give a brief overview of the field with emphasis on what is still needed. Then I will discuss some particular examples of fluorescent diamond and upconversion phosphor particles that have showed recent promise in these areas.
12238-2
Author(s): Marco Genovese, Alessio Avella, Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (Italy)
21 August 2022 • 8:45 AM - 9:15 AM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 14A
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First local temperature measurement in neurons by ODMR techniques Petrini,G., Tomagra,G., Bernardi,E., Moreva,E., Traina,P., Marcantoni,A., Picollo,F., Kvakova,K. , Cigler,P., Degiovanni,I.P., Carabelli,V., Genovese,M. After a generic review of ODMR techniques with a NV color centers in diamonds and previous results in INRIM, I will present our results that demonstrate for the first time the possibility of making localized temperature measurement with precision under 0.1 K in neurons by exploiting ODMR techniques. When activating the firing of a neuronal network using a drug that stops the inhibitory mechanism, a significant local temperature increase is detected.
12238-3
Author(s): Milena D'Angelo, Gianlorenzo Massaro, Univ. degli Studi di Bari Aldo Moro (Italy)
21 August 2022 • 9:15 AM - 9:45 AM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 14A
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We will show that photon correlations can be employed to overcome the typical limitations of conventional plenoptic imaging devices, thus leading to quantum-enhanced plenoptic imaging. In particular, we will show and unprecedented combination of resolution and depth of field combined with refocusing capability and depth extension. We will show experimental results obtained in different application scenarios, ranging from microscopy to photography-like protocols. Significant advances in acquisition speed will also be discussed, as achieved by both hardware (e.g., use of SPAD arrays, as opposed to common CMOS cameras) and software (e.g., compressive sensing, quantum tomography) solutions.
12238-4
Author(s): Chané S. Moodley, Andrew Forbes, Univ. of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa)
21 August 2022 • 9:45 AM - 10:15 AM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 14A
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Quantum ghost imaging is an alternative imaging technique which utilises pairs of entangled photons to reconstruct an image. Due to the scanning nature of spatially resolving detectors and the inherent low light levels of quantum experiments, imaging speeds are inefficient and scale quadratically with the required resolution. We leveraged artificial intelligence capabilities to achieve early object recognition and to super-resolve the reconstructed image. We achieved a 5x reduction in image acquisition times and super-resolved the images to a resolution 4x greater than the measured resolution. Leading to efficient image acquisition times without losing fine details of the image.
12238-5
Author(s): Shigeki Takeuchi, Kyoto Univ. (Japan)
21 August 2022 • 10:45 AM - 11:15 AM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 14A
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Frequency-entangled photon pairs are attracting lots of attention due to their potential for novel quantum applications, namely quantum sensing. In the first part, we report our recent activities on the efficient ultra-broadband frequency-entangled photon sources using chirped quasi phase-match waveguide devices, and broad-band frequency-entangled photon sources using on-chip ring resonators. In the second part, we report our recent efforts on the quantum sensing applications using frequency-entangled photons, namely quantum Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy based on the quantum nonlinear interferometers using frequency-entangled photons.
12238-6
Author(s): Genta Masada, Tamagawa Univ. (Japan)
21 August 2022 • 11:15 AM - 11:45 AM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 14A
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We aim to study quantum illumination using two-mode squeezed light. When quantum illumination is applied to radar systems, it is assumed that one light wave in the quantum entangled state is emitted to an outdoor environment with atmospheric disturbances. In this study, the effect of fog on the propagation of light waves was investigated. First experiments using laser light show that fog not only attenuates energy, but also causes fluctuations in intensity distribution and beam spread. Next, experiments using single-mode squeezed light show that increasing the fog concentration significantly degrades the squeezing level. This phenomenon was mainly understood by the energy attenuation by fog.
12238-7
Author(s): Anouar Rahmouni, Thomas Gerrits, Oliver Slattery, National Institute of Standards and Technology (United States)
21 August 2022 • 11:45 AM - 12:05 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 14A
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Optical time-domain reflectometry (OTDR) is one of the most used technique for nondestructive characterization of optical fiber links. Although conventional OTDR exhibits good performance in classical network applications, photon-counting OTDR (ν-OTDR) offers a promising way for in-situ optical channel characterization of quantum network fibers where single-photon detectors are present. ν-OTDR has been demonstrated at the telecommunication wavelengths at 1310 and 1550 nm. Here, we present our hyperspectral OTDR covering a wavelength range from 1000 nm to 1850 nm. We will outline the principle, experimental set-up and results.
12238-10
Author(s): Davide Giannella, Univ. degli Studi di Bari Aldo Moro (Italy), Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Gianlorenzo Massaro, Univ. degli Studi di Bari Aldo Moro (Italy), Istituto Nazaionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Francesco Di Lena, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Francesco Scattarella, Alessio Scagliola, Univ. degli Studi di Bari Aldo Moro (Italy), Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Sergii Vasiukov, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Augusto Garuccio, Francesco V. Pepe, Milena D'Angelo, Univ. degli Studi di Bari Aldo Moro (Italy), Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy)
21 August 2022 • 12:05 PM - 12:35 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 14A
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We present a novel approach to three-dimensional optical microscopy, named Correlation Light-field Microscopy (CLM). Along the line of correlation plenoptic imaging, CLM exploits correlations of intensity fluctuations, intrinsic in chaotic light, to retrieve both spatial and angular information about the sample enabling depth-of-field enhancement through refocusing and 3D scanning-free reconstruction with at-focus resolution at the diffraction limit. We demonstrate these capabilities presenting experimental results on binary masks and more complex biological samples. We compare the results obtained with conventional CLM with the ones obtained performing angular measurements in the Fourier plane of the objective lens enabling spatial filtering for edge enhancement.
Session 2: Quantum Technology and Quantum Information Science I
21 August 2022 • 2:05 PM - 5:45 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 14A
12238-11
Author(s): Hyeokjea Kwon, Joonwoo Bae, KAIST (Korea, Republic of)
21 August 2022 • 2:05 PM - 2:35 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 14A
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In this work, we show the characterization of quantum iterations that would generally construct quantum amplitude amplification algorithms with a quadratic speedup, namely, quantum amplitude amplification operators (QAAOs). Exact quantum search algorithms that find a target with certainty and with a quadratic speedup can be composed of sequential applications of QAAO: existing quantum amplitude amplification algorithms thus turn out to be sequences of QAAOs. We show that an optimal and exact quantum amplitude amplification algorithm corresponds to the Grover algorithm together with a single iteration of QAAO. We then realize 3-qubit QAAOs with the current quantum technologies via cloud-based quantum computing services, IBMQ and IonQ. Finally, our results find that fixed-point quantum search algorithms known so far are not a sequence of QAAOs, e.g. the amplitude of a target state may decrease during quantum iterations.
12238-12
Author(s): Holger F. Hofmann, Tomonori Matsushita, Shunichi Kuroki, Masataka Iinuma, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan)
21 August 2022 • 2:35 PM - 3:05 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 14A
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It is commonly assumed that interference patterns contain no information about the path taken by the individual photons. Surprisingly, recent results based on the analysis of weak interactions with probe qubits suggests that this may be a misconception. Here we show that the fluctuations of detection events in quantum interference patterns are correlated with the fluctuations of particle presence in the paths. It is pointed out that this correlation is a general feature of quantum fluctuations that distinguishes them from classical noise.
12238-13
Author(s): Travis S. Humble, Samudra Dasgupta, Oak Ridge National Lab. (United States)
21 August 2022 • 3:05 PM - 3:35 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 14A
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Alongside recent advances toward demonstrating quantum computational advantage, there is an emerging need to validate such experiments through independent efforts. However, statistical variations in the outcomes generated by a quantum circuit often arise from ill-characterized fluctuations in device noise that lead to computational errors and irreproducible results. Here we present how to assess the reproducibility of a noisy quantum circuit by quantifying these variations and bounding the expected performance with respect to the device characteristics. The resulting tests provide a means of identifying conditions under which results are statistically similar and, therefore, reproducible. Our results demonstrate an important tool for independently validating the behavior of noisy quantum circuits and, ultimately, quantum computational advantage.
12238-14
Author(s): Ramiro Rodriguez, Naval Information Warfare Ctr. Pacific (United States); Daniel Gunlycke, U.S. Naval Research Lab. (United States); Sean T. Crowe, Fernando Escobar, Joanna N. Ptasinski, Naval Information Warfare Ctr. Pacific (United States)
21 August 2022 • 4:05 PM - 4:25 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 14A
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Existing quantum processors’ hardware limitations are well acknowledged and characterized. As a result, novel approaches have surfaced aiming to maximize computational throughput. We present a strategy that increases resource efficiency, allowing near-term applications of the quantum linear systems problem by addressing the embedding of a classical problem matrix into a quantum algorithm. Our method reduces complexity order in operations and physical resources by transforming an arbitrary input problem matrix into its linear combination of Pauli coordinates to adopt the Divide and Conquer method. We expect that our method scales efficiently in resources, enabling computation of relevant problems sooner than expected.
12238-15
Author(s): Cory M. Nunn, Saurabh U. Shringarpure, James D. Franson, Todd B. Pittman, Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States)
21 August 2022 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 14A
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Single-photon subtraction (SPS) is useful for engineering optical quantum states and can be accomplished experimentally by heralding on the detection of one photon in the output port of a beamsplitter. Alternatively, conditioning on zero reflected photons modifies states by “zero-photon subtraction” (ZPS). Here we experimentally demonstrate that ZPS reduces the mean photon number of superpositions/mixtures of Fock states. The observed trends in attenuation show a dependence on the Mandel Q parameter for various input states, resulting in complementary behavior between SPS and ZPS. Theoretical results also show higher-order effects on the photon number distribution, beyond reduction in mean photon number.
12238-16
Author(s): Anouar Rahmouni, Lijun Ma, National Institute of Standards and Technology (United States); Lutong Cai, Carnegie Mellon Univ. (United States); Xiao Tang, Thomas Gerrits, National Institute of Standards and Technology (United States); Qing Li, Carnegie Mellon Univ. (United States); Oliver Slattery, National Institute of Standards and Technology (United States)
21 August 2022 • 4:55 PM - 5:25 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 14A
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Entangled photon sources are fundamental building blocks for quantum communication and quantum networks. Silicon Carbide offers promise for use in integrated quantum devices since it is a CMOS compatible material with strong thermal conductivity and a strong third-order nonlinear coefficient. In this work we realized entangled photon pairs generation at the telecom wavelength (1550 nm) through a spontaneous four-wave mixing process in a compact SiC microring resonator. We will present the design principle, experimental set-up, and results of this work.
12238-17
Author(s): Astghik A. Kuzanyan, Institute for Physical Research, NAS RA (Armenia), Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States); Artur Davoyan, Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States); Vahan Nikoghosyan, Institute for Physical Research, NAS RA (Armenia); Armen Kuzanyan, Sergey Harutyunyan, Institute for Physical Research, NAS RA (Armenia), Russian-Armenian Univ. (Armenia)
21 August 2022 • 5:25 PM - 5:45 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 14A
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We examine theoretically thermoelectric detector pixel design comprised of SiO2/ BSCCO/CeB6/ BSCCO/Al2O3 for 0.8 eV–1 keV photon energy range. We study heat transfer and show that our configuration is capable of providing a gigahertz count rate and high detection efficiency at the single-photon level at 9K. Then we examine the influence of possible noise channels and discuss pathways for creating a fast single-photon detector operating at LN temperatures.
Sunday Evening Plenary
21 August 2022 • 6:00 PM - 7:30 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 6A
12198-501
Author(s): Michael W. Berns, Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic (United States)
21 August 2022 • 6:05 PM - 6:35 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 6A
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It was 1966 and all I knew about lasers was that Goldfinger was going to slice James Bond in half. Then one of my professors at Cornell told me that the department had purchased a small ruby laser but did not know what to do with it and he felt it might be useful for very fine tissue ablation if coupled to a microscope. But the operating parameters of the red ruby laser made it difficult to control when focused to a small spot plus the absorption characteristics of most of the cell structures did not match the 694.3 nm wavelength of the laser. However, when the blue green argon ion laser was available, the ability to focus the pulsed beam to its diffraction limit plus the absorption properties of some cell structures (and the addition of light-absorbing dyes to these structures) allowed for precise ablation in spots less than 0.5 micrometer diameter, especially the chromosomes in live cells. When the nanosecond and picosecond 532nm and 355 nm harmonics of the NdYag lasers became available even greater precision of nanoablation was possible due to natural absorption by the target structure and/or non-linear multiphoton ablation which occurred regardless of absorption characteristics of the target. These optical systems were used (and still are) to perform subcellular surgery on any cell organelle visible with the light microscope. With Arthur Ashkin’s invention of optical traps (laser tweezers), cell biologists now had a complementary optical tool to the laser scissors and so began a renaissance in the use of light to finely alter and manipulate cells.
12238-502
Quantum science and metrology (Plenary Presentation)
Author(s): Jun Ye, JILA, Univ. of Colorado (United States)
21 August 2022 • 6:45 PM - 7:15 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 6A
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Precise engineering of quantum states of matter and innovative laser technology are revolutionizing the performance of atomic clocks and metrology, providing new opportunities to explore emerging phenomena, test fundamental symmetry, and search for new physics. The recent work of measuring gravitational time dilation at the sub-millimeter scale highlights exciting prospects for new scientific discovery and technology development.
Nanoscience + Engineering Plenary
22 August 2022 • 8:30 AM - 10:05 AM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 6A
Session Chairs: Gennady B. Shvets, Cornell Univ. (United States), Cornelia Denz, Westfälische Wilhelms-Univ. Münster (Germany)
8:30 AM - 8:35 AM: Welcome and Opening Remarks
12203-501
Author(s): Lisa V. Poulikakos, Univ. of California, San Diego (United States)
22 August 2022 • 8:35 AM - 9:10 AM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 6A
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The origin and progression of a variety of leading health challenges, encompassing Alzheimer’s disease, heart disease, fibrosis and cancer, are directly linked to changes in the presence and orientation of fibrous matter in biological tissue. Here, we leverage the unique properties of anisotropic, colorimetric metasurfaces to scale down the complex manipulation of light and selectively visualize disease-relevant fiber density and orientation in biological tissue. Starting with the example of breast cancer diagnostics, we then expand our view to the rich palette of fiber-affecting diseases where metasurfaces hold great potential as rapid, precise and low-cost tissue diagnostics with facile clinical implementation.
12204-502
Author(s): Keren Bergman, Columbia Univ. (United States)
22 August 2022 • 9:20 AM - 9:55 AM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 6A
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High performance data centers are increasingly bottlenecked by the energy and communications costs of interconnection networks. Our recent work has shown how integrated silicon photonics with comb-driven dense wavelength-division multiplexing can scale to realize Pb/s chip escape bandwidths with sub-picojoule/bit energy consumption. We use this emerging interconnect technology to introduce the concept of embedded photonics for deeply disaggregated architectures. Beyond alleviating the bandwidth/energy bottlenecks, the new architectural approach enables flexible connectivity tailored for specific applications.
Session 3: Quantum Technology and Quantum Information Science II
22 August 2022 • 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 14A
12238-18
Author(s): Koji Azuma, NTT Basic Research Labs. (Japan)
22 August 2022 • 10:30 AM - 11:00 AM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 14A
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Entanglement is a fundamental resource not only for quantum communication but also for distributed quantum computation. Especially, entanglement including only one type of error is favorable, compared with one including multiple types of noise. In this talk, we consider protocol that presents single-error-type entanglement for distant qubits via coherent-state transmission over lossy channels. This protocol is considered to be a subroutine to serve entanglement for larger protocol to yield a final output, such as ebits or pbits. A protocol based on remote non-destructive parity measurement (RNPM) [K. Azuma, H. Takeda, M. Koashi, and N. Imoto, Phys. Rev. A 85, 062309 (2012)] is identified as a subroutine which achieves the global optimal for typical yield functions monotonically non-decreasing with respect to the singlet fraction, such as an arbitrary convex function of a singlet fraction and two-way distillable entanglement/key.
12238-19
Author(s): Christina C. C. Willis, ColdQuanta, Inc. (United States)
22 August 2022 • 11:00 AM - 11:20 AM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 14A
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Cold and ultracold states of matter have great potential to enable and disrupt applications of information science, sensing, navigation, and timekeeping. In this talk, we will explore several exciting topics within the cold atom quantum sensor space, including context for the specific challenges and relevant technologies that enable sensing applications on cold atom platforms. To successfully transition these states of matter from pure science to out-of-the-laboratory critical engineering tools, it is necessary to simplify, stabilize--and ultimately commercialize--the building blocks of cold atom systems. We present enabling technologies to address the technical challenges of preparing cold atom-based systems.
12238-20
Author(s): Summer Bolton, The Univ. of Alabama (United States); Joseph Lukens, Oak Ridge National Lab. (United States); Maddy Woodson, Steven Estrella, Freedom Photonics, LLC (United States); Patrick Kung, Seongsin M. Kim, The Univ. of Alabama (United States)
22 August 2022 • 11:20 AM - 11:40 AM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 14A
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There is an increasing interest in optical fiber transduction to microwave link with superconducting and Si qubits, but these systems are restricted to operate at ultracold temperatures. An electro-optical microwave transducer using the heterodyning beat method is tested to measure frequency response of a MUTC-PD along with linearity dependencies. The results show that linearity does depend on frequency, bias voltage, and temperature. A reverse bias of 5V results in the highest 1-dB compression point and no reverse bias with frequency of 10GHz showing the lowest. These findings will contribute to the future design of high-linearity cryogenic quantum links.
12238-21
Author(s): Lucio Zugliani, Rasmus Flaschmann, Christian Schmid, Stefan Strohauer, Fabian Wietschorke, Stefanie Grotowski, Simone Spedicato, Sven Ernst, Fabian Flassig, Technische Univ. München (Germany); Matthias Althammer, Rudolf Gross, Walther-Meissner-Institute (Germany); Jonathan Finley, Kai Müller, Technische Univ. München (Germany)
22 August 2022 • 11:40 AM - 12:00 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 14A
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In this work, recent developments in the study of Superconducting Nanowire Single Photon Detectors (SNSPDs) are presented. This devices properties highly depends on the quality of the superconducting films from which they are fabricated. Here, we study some film properties for SNSPDs made out of NbTiN and MoSi in function of the deposition parameters. Subsequently we focus on the properties of the fabricated detector, such as efficiency, timing resolution and energy sensitivity.
12238-24
Author(s): Miller Eaton, Amr Hossameldin, Univ. of Virginia (United States); Christopher C. Gerry, Richard J. Birrittella, Lehman College, CUNY (United States); Paul M. Alsing, Air Force Research Lab. (United States); Olivier Pfister, Univ. of Virginia (United States)
22 August 2022 • 12:00 PM - 12:30 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 14A
Session 4: Quantum Networking and Quantum Communications
22 August 2022 • 2:00 PM - 5:30 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 14A
12238-25
Author(s): Yefeng Mei, Yin Li, Huy N. Nguyen, Brian Yang, Paul R. Berman, Alex Kuzmich, Univ. of Michigan (United States)
22 August 2022 • 2:00 PM - 2:30 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 14A
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Collective qubits between atomic ground and Rydberg states can be converted, on-demand, into single photons, making them well-suited for scalable quantum network-type protocols. We demonstrate long-lived many-body Rabi oscillations and multi-particle entanglement, as well as study the dynamics of interaction-induced dephasing for collective Rydberg qubits held in a state-insensitive optical lattice trap. Both excitation blockade and spin-wave dephasing can contribute to suppression of multiple excitations, allowing for deterministic preparation of collective atomic qubits, single photons, and atom-photon entanglement for quantum information processing.
12238-26
Author(s): Vijit Bedi, Air Force Research Lab. (United States)
22 August 2022 • 2:30 PM - 2:50 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 14A
12238-27
Author(s): William J. Munro, NTT Basic Research Labs. (Japan); Yi-Han Luo, Ming-Cheng Chen, Univ. of Science and Technology of China (China); Manuel Erhard, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften (Austria); Han-Sen Zhong, Dian Wu, Hao-Yang Tang, Qi Zhao, Xi-Lin Wang, Univ. of Science and Technology of China (China); Keisuke Fujii, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Li Li, Nai-Le Liu, Univ. of Science and Technology of China (China); Kae Nemoto, National Institute of Informatics (Japan); Chao-Yang Lu, Univ. of Science and Technology of China (China); Anton Zeilinger, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften (Austria); Jian-Wei Pan, Univ. of Science and Technology of China (China)
22 August 2022 • 2:50 PM - 3:20 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 14A
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The quantum internet will give us an infrastructure able to distribute and process quantum information on a planetary scale. The core of that internet will be formed from quantum error corrected links able to distribute information over large distances all while maintaining their coherence for long periods of time. However, many of the applications at the edge of such networks may rely on raw unencoded data – not protected by error correcting codes due to the nature of how it was generated. In this presentation, we will describe an experiment in which quantum information encoded on a physical qubit can be teleported into an error-corrected logical qubit. Our demonstration shows how one can get information into and out of quantum processors and tomorrows large-scale quantum networks.
12238-28
Author(s): Alfonso Tello Castillo, Ross Donaldson, Heriot-Watt Univ. (United Kingdom)
22 August 2022 • 3:50 PM - 4:10 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 14A
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Time bin and phase difference protocols for QKD offer interesting advantages over their polarization counterparts, such as fast pulsing capabilities, cheaper architectures, or the lack of active compensation. In addition, researchers have published transmitters capable of performing more than one protocol, the most popular being the combination of COW, DPS and time-bin BB84. Also, the QKD community has mainly focused on single beam implementations, but there is also the possibility of boosting the secret key rate (SKR) with the use of different multiplexing techniques. In this talk, we present a full QKD free space system, able to work with the COW protocol, also commenting in the recent concerns about its security implications. A SKR is derived under different channels scenarios, achieving rates in the order of kbps. Finally, some thoughts on how to improve the SKR further are discussed.
12238-29
Author(s): Lijun Ma, National Institute of Standards and Technology (United States); Leah Ding, American Univ. (United States)
22 August 2022 • 4:10 PM - 4:40 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 14A
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Edge computing network and quantum network are two emerging technologies in current communication fields. Edge network provides timely and readily accessible data transmission and processing. Quantum network supports distributed quantum computing, which could provide exponentially computation capabilities for certain problems. Integration of edge network and quantum network will achieve unparalleled capabilities that are provably impossible by using only classical computing or quantum computing schemes alone. In this presentation, we introduce the concept of hybrid quantum-edge computing network and discuss its challenges and opportunities.
12238-30
Author(s): RuiMing Chua, Technology Innovation Institute (United Arab Emirates), National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore); Alexander Ling, Ctr. for Quantum Technologies (Singapore), National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore); James A. Grieve, Technology Innovation Institute (United Arab Emirates), Ctr. for Quantum Technologies (Singapore)
22 August 2022 • 4:40 PM - 5:10 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 14A
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Unfiltered, broadband SPDC sources are shown to be compatible with an all-fiber based method of nonlocal dispersion compensation, preserving timing correlations to within 10ps of our instrument limit. Improvements are introduced to further ease the deployment and enhance the efficiency of this scheme towards real-world use. To this end, photon timing correlations were preserved over 40km of standard G.652/7 telecommunication fiber, with minor adjustments to optimize nonlocal dispersion compensation with as little as 2km of standard G.655 telecommunication fiber. This method has potential to be one of the least disruptive dispersion mitigation strategies for fiber-based quantum communication systems.
12238-31
Author(s): Josef Vojtech, Rudolf Vohnout, Ondrej Havlis, Martin Slapak, Petr Pospisil, Lada Altmannová, Tomas Horvath, Radek Velc, Jan Kundrat, Sarbojeet Bhowmick, Michal Hazlinsky, CESNET z.s.p.o. (Czech Republic)
22 August 2022 • 5:10 PM - 5:30 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 14A
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In contribution we describe design, line re-arrangement and summarize experiences with deployment of DV-QKD system over 16 dB, 75 km long line shared with telecom data and precise time transmissions, where secure key bit rate of 2 kbps has been achieved. The uniqueness of the contribution would consist in interconnection of two independent and separately managed NREN domains. As a result the cross-border QKD connection makes adjacent networks to become trusted to each other and creates unique quantum communication between two neighboring countries.
Poster Session
22 August 2022 • 5:30 PM - 7:30 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Exhibit Hall B1
Conference attendees are invited to view a collection of posters within the topics of Nanoscience + Engineering, Organic Photonics + Electronics, and Optical Engineering + Applications. Enjoy light refreshments, ask questions, and network with colleagues in your field. Authors of poster papers will be present to answer questions concerning their papers. Attendees are required to wear their conference registration badges to the poster session.

Poster authors, visit Poster Presentation Guidelines for set-up instructions.
12238-32
Author(s): Si Luo, Shiqing Tang, Hengyang Normal Univ. (China)
22 August 2022 • 5:30 PM - 7:30 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Exhibit Hall B1
12238-33
Author(s): Ziqiu Zhang, Shiqing Tang, Hengyang Normal Univ. (China)
22 August 2022 • 5:30 PM - 7:30 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Exhibit Hall B1
12238-34
Author(s): Anouar Rahmouni, Thomas Gerrits, Oliver Slattery, National Institute of Standards and Technology (United States)
22 August 2022 • 5:30 PM - 7:30 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Exhibit Hall B1
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A quantum network will consist of many physically separated nodes connected by quantum communication channels that distribute entanglement between them. Such nodes will require mechanisms for the generation, routing, and measurement of quantum states to fulfill a communication protocol between any two quantum nodes. The aim of this work is to develop portable/rack-mounted, low-cost, robust, and reliable tools that can be deployed anywhere into a quantum network testbed. In this talk, we will present our progress and results towards developing well-characterized prototypes of a relatively low cost and portable polarization-entangled photon source and receiver.
Conference Chair
DEVCOM Army Research Lab. (United States)
Conference Chair
DEVCOM Army Research Lab. (United States)
Program Committee
Stefania A. Castelletto
RMIT Univ. (Australia)
Program Committee
Univ. degli Studi di Bari Aldo Moro (Italy)
Program Committee
Oak Ridge National Lab. (United States)
Program Committee
Air Force Research Lab. (United States)
Program Committee
Los Alamos National Lab. (Retired) (United States)
Program Committee
Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)
Program Committee
NTT Basic Research Labs. (Japan)
Program Committee
Kae Nemoto
National Institute of Informatics (Japan)
Program Committee
Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States)
Program Committee
Univ. of Calgary (Canada)
Program Committee
Boston Univ. (United States)
Program Committee
Oliver Slattery
National Institute of Standards and Technology (United States)
Program Committee
Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
Program Committee
Kyoto Univ. (Japan)