JOIN THE IN-PERSON EVENT IN SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA
1 - 5 August 2021
Quantum communications and quantum imaging are emerging technologies that promise great benefits beyond classical communications and classical imaging - as well as great challenges. The objective of this conference is to provide a forum for scientists, researchers, and system developers in both fields and encourage technology exchange between the quantum communication and quantum imaging research communities. Papers are solicited on the following and related topics:

QUANTUM COMMUNICATIONS, QUANTUM INTERNET, AND QUANTUM INFORMATION

QUANTUM IMAGING AND QUANTUM SENSING
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Conference 11835

Quantum Communications and Quantum Imaging XIX

In person: 1 - 5 August 2021 • 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM PDT
On demand starting 1 August 2021
View Session ∨
  • 1: Quantum Imaging / Quantum Sensing
  • 2: Quantum Communications
  • 3: Quantum Technology
  • 4: Entanglement
Session 1: Quantum Imaging / Quantum Sensing
11835-1
Author(s): Peng Kian Tan, Christian Kurtsiefer, Ctr. for Quantum Technologies, National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore)
On demand starting 1 August 2021
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An optical ranging technique is successfully demonstrated using stationary light implemented on a semiconductor laser diode operating below the threshold current, with the time-of-flight information needed for ranging measurements provided for by thermal photon bunching. In contrast, conventional optical ranging instrumentation require a light source to be timing modulated in intensity, phase, or frequency, with which to correlate the reference and probe-to-target beams. This reference-probe correlation provides the time-of-flight information from which the target distance can then be measured. Presently, quantum ranging schemes derive timing correlation information from spontaneous parametric down-conversion sources which need not be timing modulated; however, such light sources are complex and expensive to construct.
11835-2
Author(s): Cesare Barbieri, Univ. degli Studi di Padova (Italy), INAF (Italy); Luca Zampieri, INAF (Italy); Giampiero Naletto, Univ. degli Studi di Padova (Italy), INAF (Italy); Alexandr Burtovoi, Univ. degli Studi di Padova (Italy); Michele Fiori, INAF (Italy)
On demand starting 1 August 2021
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This paper illustrates the results of an experiment performed in the frame of the Asiago Observatory Stellar Intensity Interferometry program, aimed to exploit the quantum properties of the photon stream emitted from celestial objects. Data are acquired over two telescopes separated by approximately 4 km, in photon counting mode and post processing analysis. The temporal and spatial correlation function g(2) on the bright star Vega have been successfully measured at zero baseline and at a 2 km baseline is reported. The result is fully consistent with that expected for a source with the angular diameter of Vega (approximately3.3 milliarcseonds).
11835-3
Author(s): Genta Masada, Tamagawa Univ. (Japan)
On demand starting 1 August 2021
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In quantum illumination, one light wave in a quantum entangled state is emitted toward a target in atmospheric disturbance. Therefore, it is important to investigate the propagation characteristics of light waves in atmospheric disturbances. We investigated the propagation characteristics of laser light under various atmospheric conditions. Significant energy attenuation and beam size fluctuations were observed in the drizzle-like mist. Under the influence of thermal fluctuation, fluctuation of beam size and position was observed. Also, the uniform temperature airflow did not significantly affect beam propagation. At the conference, we will also report recent experimental results on the propagation of squeezed light during atmospheric disturbances.
11835-4
Author(s): Michal Parniak, Mateusz Mazelanik, Adam Leszczynski, Michal Lipka, Konrad Banaszek, Wojciech Wasilewski, Univ. of Warsaw (Poland)
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The concept of temporal imaging draws from the analogy between paraxial propagation of light in space and in dispersive media. So far, temporal imaging has been demonstrated with ultrafast light, corresponding to spectral precision in the THz range. In our quantum memory, we have implemented full spectral and temporal processing capabilities for ultra narrowband photons, which allow us to perform temporal imaging with MHz bandwidth and kHz precision. Implementation of this concept leads to many implications, which give rise to two distinct super-resolved spectroscopy schemes, inspired by recent developments in spatial super-resolved imaging. One scheme takes advantage of elaborate interference in the quantum memory, while the other uses optimized analysis of a homodyne detector traces. Overall, our approach not only brings temporal imaging to the previously untackled regime but also points to a variety of new schemes useful in quantum sensing.
11835-5
Author(s): Richard Murchie, John Jeffers, Jonathan Pritchard, Univ. of Strathclyde (United Kingdom)
On demand starting 1 August 2021
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Practical quantum lidar relies upon detecting an illuminated possible target object with simple non-optimal measurements, typically with Geiger-mode detectors. These measurements do not require interferometric stability and are experimentally feasible. While quantum illumination has an advantage over classical illumination for optimal measurements, whether an advantage persists for Geiger-mode detectors is open to question. We provide a theoretical framework applied to both quantum and classical illumination for target detection to show when a quantum advantage could exist. Knowledge of regimes that show quantum advantage will inform how a practical quantum lidar system could be applied.
11835-6
Author(s): Chané Moodley, Bereneice Sephton, Valeria Rodriguez-Fajardo, Andrew Forbes, Univ. of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa)
On demand starting 1 August 2021
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Quantum ghost imaging utilises entangled photon pairs, which can be either degenerate or non-degenerate in nature. Innate to ghost imaging is the use of a spatially resolving detector in the reference arm and a bucket detector in the object arm. The scanning nature of the former leads to unsatisfactory imaging speeds. Employing a two-step deep learning procedure, we establish an optimal early stopping point reducing the number of measurements and inherently the number of photons required to form an image. Utilising an auto-encoder for enhancement and a classifier for recognition we achieved a 5-fold decrease in image reconstruction time.
11835-7
Author(s): Francesco Vincenzo Pepe, Univ. degli Studi di Bari Aldo Moro (Italy); Francesco Di Lena, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Davide Giannella, Alessandro Lupo, Gianlorenzo Massaro, Alessio Scagliola, Univ. degli Studi di Bari Aldo Moro (Italy); Sergey Vasyukov, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Augusto Garuccio, Milena D'Angelo, Univ. degli Studi di Bari Aldo Moro (Italy)
On demand starting 1 August 2021
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We present novel methods to perform plenoptic imaging at the diffraction limit by measuring intensity correlations of light. The first method is oriented towards plenoptic microscopy, a promising technique which allows refocusing and depth-of-field enhancement, in post-processing, as well as scanning free 3D imaging. To overcome the limitations of standard plenoptic microscopes, we propose an adaptation of Correlation Plenoptic Imaging (CPI) to the working conditions of microscopy. We consider and compare different architectures of CPI microscopes, and discuss the improved robustness with respect to previous protocols against turbulence around the sample. The second method is based on measuring correlations between the images of two reference planes, arbitrarily chosen within the tridimensional scene of interest, providing an unprecedented combination of image resolution and depth of field. The results lead the way towards the realization of compact designs for CPI devices.
Session 2: Quantum Communications
11835-8
Author(s): Dmitry V. Strekalov, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Charis Anastopoulos, Univ. of Patras (Greece); Bradley Carpenter, NASA Headquarters (United States); Jason R. Gallicchio, Harvey Mudd College (United States); Bei-Lok Hu, Univ. of Maryland, College Park (United States); Ulf E. Israelsson, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Thomas Jennewein, Univ. of Waterloo (Canada); Paul Kwiat, Univ. of Illinois (United States); Shih-Yuin Lin, National Changhua Univ. of Education (Taiwan); Alexander Ling, National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore); Christoph Marquardt, Max-Planck-Institut für die Physik des Lichts (Germany); Andrey Matsko, Luca Mazzarella, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Matthias Meister, Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (Germany); Brian S. Moffat, Univ. of Waterloo (Canada); Makan Mohageg, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Raymond T. Newell, Los Alamos National Lab. (United States); Albert Roura, Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (Germany); Wolfgang P. Schleich, Univ. Ulm (Germany); Christian Schubert, Leibniz Univ. Hannover (Germany); Giuseppe Vallone, Paolo Villoresi, Univ. degli Studi di Padova (Italy); Lisa Woerner, Univ. Bremen (Germany); Nan Yu, Aileen J. Zhai, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
On demand starting 1 August 2021
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NASA’s “Deep Space Quantum Link” initiative is set to explore the relativistic effects in quantum optics using very long-range measurements by observers moving at high relative velocities and residing in substantially different gravitational potentials. The spectrum of scientific objectives of this initiative ranges from the planetary baseline teleportation and Bell measurements, to gravitational dephasing and decoherence, and to tests of the Equivalence Principle. It also includes the quantum information technology demonstrations. We review the goals and feasibility of these research directions and put them in the context of present state of knowledge in quantum optics and general relativity.
11835-9
Author(s): Koji Azuma, NTT Basic Research Labs. (Japan)
On demand starting 1 August 2021
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The private capacity of a lossy bosonic channel shows that there remains not much room to improve known point-to-point quantum key distribution (QKD) protocols further, in terms of the key rate versus distance. The current question in our field is how to overcome this fundamental limit with the help of a single station in the middle between communicators. In this talk, we explore recent trials to achieve this goal, such as adaptive measurement-device-independent QKD and twin-field QKD. These trials are good milestones towards the realization of quantum repeater networks.
11835-10
Author(s): Abhishek Parakh, Mahadevan Subramaniam, Univ. of Nebraska at Omaha (United States)
On demand starting 1 August 2021
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This paper proposes the use of multi-photon quantum cryptography to provide higher data exchange rates and security in quantum networks. Since multipath routing protocols have shown to achieve higher key distribution rates, we investigate the interplay of multiphoton quantum cryptography with multipath routing for higher levels of security. We investigate different routing strategies and their effects on key rates, path establishment probabilities, and security. Our simulation varies parameters such as the network size, topology, length of fiber channels, and probability of success of Bell State measurement and probability of channel decoherence. Lastly, we also examine the effect of including a limited number of trusted nodes in a network and their location relative to the network topology and communicating endpoints.
11835-11
Author(s): Jiyoung Yun, Ashutosh Rai, Joonwoo Bae, KAIST (Korea, Republic of)
On demand starting 1 August 2021
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In a network, a channel introduces correlations to the parties that aim to establish a communication protocol. In this work, we present a framework of non-local network coding by exploiting a Bell scenario and show the usefulness of non-local and quantum resources in network coding. Two-sender and two-receiver interference channels are considered, for which network coding is characterized by two-input and four-outcome Bell scenarios. It is shown that non-signaling (quantum) correlations lead to strictly higher channel capacities in general than quantum (local) correlations. It is also shown that, however, more non-locality does not necessarily imply a higher channel capacity. The framework can be generally applied to network communication protocols.
11835-12
Author(s): Matthew Kelley, Pavel Ionov, Andrew K. Mollner, Uttam Paudel, Noel De la Cruz, Samuel M. Dietrich, Joseph D. Touch, Ethan H. Tucker, The Aerospace Corp. (United States)
On demand starting 1 August 2021
11835-13
Author(s): Kae Nemoto, National Institute of Informatics (Japan)
On demand starting 1 August 2021
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When packets of information go through a network, each packet can be transmitted on a different route. The aggregation of quantum network provides a potential for us to use communication channels more efficiently and may contribute robust transmissions of quantum information with less quantum resources. To evaluate this possibility, we use multiplexing of independent quantum channels to distribute quantum error correction over the network. In this talk we also apply spatial-temporal single photon multiplexing and observe a significant saving in the quantum communication resources, and further we discuss how such quantum networks differ from their classical counterparts.
11835-14
Author(s): Marina Mondin, Fred Daneshgaran, California State Univ., Los Angeles (United States); Shlomi Arnon, Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev (Israel); Marco Genovese, Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (Italy); Inam Bari, Military Technological College (Oman); Omar U. Khan, National Univ. of Computer and Emerging Sciences (Pakistan); Francesco Di Stasio, Politecnico di Torino (Italy); Judy Kupferman, Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev (Israel); Alice Meda, Ivo Pietro Degiovanni, Marco Gramegna, Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (Italy); Maqsood Khan, National Univ. of Computer and Emerging Sciences (Pakistan); Najeeb Ullah, National Univ. of Sciences and Technology (Pakistan); Khashayar Olia, Jason May, Joshua Neilson, California State Univ., Los Angeles (United States)
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This manuscript discusses the most relevant aspects of the practical implementation of a long-range Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) link with trusted nodes, achieving the highest possible secret key rate generation within the security and system-level constraints. To this purpose, the implementation of an end-to-end QKD system is described, including implementation aspects from the physical transmission of photon states through a standard telecommunications grade optical fiber, to consideration of quantum metrology and information reconciliation protocols based on forward error correction codes. In addition, since there are circumstances when a fiber optical link may not be available, we will also discuss the problems involved with the implementation of a Free Space Optics (FSO) QKD link. The manuscript also discusses the problem of information reconciliation in CV-QKD scenarios (both on fiber and FSO links), based on an Unequal Error Protection (UEP) reverse reconciliation scheme.
Session 3: Quantum Technology
11835-15
Author(s): William J. Munro, Yanbao Zhang, Hsin-Pin Lo, NTT Basic Research Labs. (Japan); Alan Mink, National Institute of Standards and Technology (United States); Takuya Ikuta, Toshimori Honjo, Hiroki Takesue, NTT Basic Research Labs. (Japan)
On demand starting 1 August 2021
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Random numbers which are unpredictable and definitely unknown by anyone before they are generated are now used in a large number of real-world applications ranging from authentication, gaming, many online activities to simulations and optimizations. The development of a trusted randomness source is thus a necessity. In this work we present a simple design of a certifiable quantum random number generation and its. In particular we show how real-time low-latency randomness can be generated from measurements on time-bin photonic states every 0.12s. We generate a block of 2^13 random bits certifiable against the most powerful quantum adversary with its error bounded by 2^-64. Further our device is suitable for continuous operation giving it a potential application as a quantum randomness beacon.
11835-16
Author(s): Marco Genovese, Giuseppe Ortolano, Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (Italy)
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From quantum reading to quantum conformance test M.Genovese,I.Ruo Berchera,G.Ortolano We show as quantum reading presents an advantage by practical photon-counting measurements combined with a simple maximum-likelihood decision, showing that this receiver combined with twin beams is able to outperform any strategy based on statistical mixtures of coherent states. Our experimental findings demonstrate that quantum entanglement and simple optics are able to enhance the readout of digital data, paving the way to real applications Then we consider theoretically a protocol addressing the task of conformance test with specific attention to the case in which the tested object can be modeled by a pure loss quantum channel. We demonstrate that twin beams and a simple receiver based on a photon counting measurement are able to outperform any classical strategy in recognizing if a certain quantum channel conforms to a reference one.
11835-17
Author(s): Francesca Madonini, Fabio Severini, Franco Zappa, Federica Villa, Politecnico di Milano (Italy)
On demand starting 1 August 2021
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Thanks to their compactness, low-voltage operation, single-photon sensitivity, absence of readout noise, and high frame-rate, SPAD arrays are particularly suited to detect entangled photons in quantum imaging applications. This work presents a method to model a real measurement setup and to calculate the expected photon rate at detector level. The method is applied to evaluate the performance of a SPAD array architecture based on an on-chip detection of photon coincidences, followed by an event-driven readout which transfers only the positions of the involved pixels. Although bringing advantages in terms of power consumption, data storage, and readout time, especially as the pixels number increases, the intrinsic non-ideal times of operation of this architecture are linked to three possible cases of wrong detection. A detailed computation of these error probabilities is provided, together with a discussion about which design parameters most influence the detected signal quality.
11835-18
Author(s): Masaya Arahata, Yu Mukai, Bo Cao, Toshiyuki Tashima, Ryo Okamoto, Shigeki Takeuchi, Kyoto Univ. (Japan)
On demand starting 1 August 2021
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Visible-infrared photon pair sources working in broadband mid-infrared region are useful for applications such as heralded mid-infrared single photon sources. Here, we demonstrate experimentally a wavelength variable visible-infrared photon pair source in the mid-infrared region over a wide spectral range of 2 to 5 μm. By changing the angle of the nonlinear crystal in the source, the observed wavelengths of the signal photons change from 600 to 965 nm, corresponding to the idler wavelengths in 1186-4694 nm.
11835-19
Author(s): Fabio Severini, Francesca Madonini, Franco Zappa, Federica Villa, Politecnico di Milano (Italy)
On demand starting 1 August 2021
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Quantum imaging and microscopy profit from entangled photons to surpass the boundaries of classical optics, thus improving image resolution. Thanks to their single-photon sensitivity, readout noise absence, low-voltage operation and high framerate, detectors based on Single-Photon Avalanche-Diodes (SPADs) are particularly suited for this application field. In this work we discuss strengths and weaknesses of different SPAD based architectures, highlighting those to be exploited as quantum imagers, eventually providing guidelines towards next-generation quantum imagers. In particular, we ascertained three key features for optimal detection of entangled photons, namely spatial resolution, photon coincidence detection capability, and event driven-readout. The discussed architectures are classified as analog or digital Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs), SPAD arrays, or SiPM arrays. Among the four, just SPAD arrays are capable of spatial resolution at single-SPAD level and, through the possib
11835-20
Author(s): Miller Eaton, Univ. of Virginia (United States); Rajveer Nehra, Caltech (United States); Olivier Pfister, Univ. of Virginia (United States)
11835-21
Author(s): Mateusz Mrozowski, Univ. of Strathclyde (United Kingdom)
On demand starting 1 August 2021
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We present progress towards the development of a practical source of heralded single photons for quantum LIDAR using a compact and inexpensive diode laser system. Photon-pairs are generated through spontaneous four-wave mixing in commercial birefringent optical fiber, pumped with transform limited picosecond pulses with GHz repetition rates derived from a single mode laser diode using cavity enhanced optical frequency comb generation. This method can be adapted to any pump wavelength enabling future adaptation telecoms frequencies, uses relatively few optics and can be pumped directly using high efficiency diodes, additionally providing high repetition rate unobtainable by current commercial sources.
11835-22
Author(s): Pooja Rao, Mathematical Sciences Research Institute (United States); Paulo Castillo, Farmingdale State College (United States); Byung Chun Kim, Kyungtaek Jun, Hyunju Lee, National Institute for Mathematical Sciences (Korea, Republic of); Kwangmin Yu, Brookhaven National Lab. (United States)
On demand starting 1 August 2021
11835-23
Author(s): Philip R. Hemmer, Texas A&M Univ. (United States)
On demand starting 1 August 2021
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Diamond optical emitters have been explored extensively in recent years for applications to quantum information and processing. Similarly, rare-earth dopant ions in ceramic crystals have also been explored for quantum applications, especially memories. Recently, both classes of these quantum emitters have been explored for bio-sensing. Each has unique advantages. In this talk I will discuss the possibility simultaneously using both of these material systems for advanced biosensing. I will also discuss some of our recent work to fabricate composite particles containing both systems, in an attempt to get the “best of both worlds.”
11835-24
Author(s): Geoff J. Pryde, Griffith Univ. (Australia)
On demand starting 1 August 2021
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Session 4: Entanglement
11835-25
Author(s): Holger F. Hofmann, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan)
On demand starting 1 August 2021
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The enhancement of two photon absorption by time-energy entanglement depends sensitively on the precise phase coherence of the intermediate states involved in the transition. In this presentation, we consider the optimal phase dispersion for broad-band entanglement and show that significant additional enhancements of the absorption cross-section can be achieved when the bandwidth of intermediate states is very narrow.
11835-26
Author(s): Shigeki Takeuchi, Kyoto Univ. (Japan)
On demand starting 1 August 2021
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Efficient analysis of the quantum states of photons are essential for photonic quantum technologies. In the first part, we report the experimental demonstration of direct and efficient verification of entanglement between two multimode-multiphoton systems (one photon in three modes and two photons in three modes) using just two sets of classical correlation tables with and without a discrete Fourier transformation of the optical modes, clearly demonstrating a dramatic reduction in the resources required for entanglement verification. In the second part, we report our experimental demonstration of adaptive quantum state estimation for quantum states of photons changing in time.
Conference Chair
CCDC Army Research Lab. (United States)
Conference Chair
CCDC Army Research Lab. (United States)
Program Committee
Stefania A. Castelletto
RMIT Univ. (Australia)
Program Committee
Univ. degli Studi di Bari Aldo Moro (Italy)
Program Committee
Qubitekk (United States)
Program Committee
Air Force Research Lab. (United States)
Program Committee
Los Alamos National Lab. (Retired) (United States)
Program Committee
Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)
Program Committee
NTT Basic Research Labs. (Japan)
Program Committee
Kae Nemoto
National Institute of Informatics (Japan)
Program Committee
Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States)
Program Committee
Univ. of Calgary (Canada)
Program Committee
Boston Univ. (United States)
Program Committee
Oliver Slattery
National Institute of Standards and Technology (United States)
Program Committee
Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
Program Committee
Kyoto Univ. (Japan)
Additional Information

POST-DEADLINE ABSTRACT SUBMISSIONS CLOSED

  • Submissions accepted through 15-June
  • Notification of acceptance by 1-July

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