Quantum-enabled devices from components to systems will benefit many commercial sectors including the healthcare, energy, security, automotive and telecommunications industries. Quantum-enhanced sensing/imaging, communications, and computing/simulation systems have all seen considerable recent advances. However, significant progress is still required to drive the migration of these devices from laboratory settings to the commercial world. This conference provides a forum for the international engineering and research communities in industry, government and academia to discuss the current state of these emerging quantum technologies, the progress made towards commercialisation and the gaps that remain in this process. Original papers on and related to the following categories and topics are solicited for inclusion in this conference.

Advances in Quantum-enhanced imaging solutions including:

Progress in Quantum-enabled Communications including:

Developments in Quantum Sensors and Timing Systems:

Developments in Quantum Information Systems and Quantum Computing:
;
In progress – view active session
Conference 11881

Quantum Technology: Driving Commercialisation of an Enabling Science

In person: 28 - 30 September 2021 | Lomond Auditorium
View Session ∨
  • 1: Quantum Communication
  • 2: Free-space Quantum Communication
  • 3: Quantum Networking and Advanced Protocols
  • Wednesday Plenary Session
  • 4: Silicon Photonics in Quantum Technologies: Joint Session with Conferences 11880 and 11881
  • 5: Quantum Sensors for Fundamental Physics I
  • Poster Session
  • 6: Quantum Sensors for Fundamental Physics II
  • Thursday Plenary Session
  • 7: Quantum Sensors for Quantum Technologies I
  • 8: Quantum Sensors for Quantum Technologies II
  • 9: Quantum Technologies with Photons
Session 1: Quantum Communication
In person: 28 September 2021 • 11:10 AM - 12:30 PM BST | Lomond Auditorium
Session Chair: Alessandro Fedrizzi, Heriot-Watt Univ. (United Kingdom)
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Author(s): Marco Lucamarini, Univ. of York (United Kingdom)
On demand | Presented Live 28 September 2021
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Since they were first introduced, quantum communications have evolved into a mature technology that is making its way to market. Quantum key distribution (QKD), in particular, allows the exchange of information with security that stems from the very laws of quantum mechanics and hence is not impaired by future technological advances. These same laws, however, restrict the QKD transmission range, as they forbid a straightforward amplification of quantum signals. This leads to a fundamental rate-distance bound known as the “repeaterless secret key capacity” (SKC0), which was thought to be impossible to overcome without a full-fledged quantum repeater. The recent proposal of “Twin-Field QKD” challenged this belief and showed how to overcome the SKC0 with an effective quantum repeater, realisable with present-day technology. This allows to perform QKD over long-distance and high-loss channels. In my talk, I will review the main concepts and most significant results behind this novel idea.
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Author(s): Christopher L. Morrison, Francesco Graffitti, Zhe Xian Koong, Heriot-Watt Univ. (United Kingdom); Nick G. Stoltz, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara (United States); Dirk Bouwmeester, Leiden Univ. (Netherlands); Alessandro Fedrizzi, Brian D. Gerardot, Heriot-Watt Univ. (United Kingdom)
On demand | Presented Live 28 September 2021
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A source of bright and pure single photons is an essential tool for photonic quantum technologies, predicted to enable secure communication and networking. Self-assembled quantum dots are among the leading candidates to realise such a source. The currently highest-performing quantum dots emit at wavelengths unsuitable for fibre transmission, with telecom quantum dots lagging in performance. An intermediate step is to use quantum frequency conversion. Here we report to our knowledge the brightest quantum dot based source of telecom photons by frequency converting a near-infrared quantum dot embedded in a micropillar cavity to the telecom C-band. In a single-photon BB84 protocol, this source is capable of producing asymptotic keys rates of 1 kbps at over 150 km of optical fibre.
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Author(s): Damián Pitalúa-García, Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Mathieu Bozzio, Univ. Wien (Austria), Lab. d'informatique de Paris 6, Sorbonne Univ. (France); Adrien Cavailles, Eleni Diamanti, Lab. d'informatique de Paris 6, Sorbonne Univ. (France); Adrian Kent, Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)
On demand | Presented Live 28 September 2021
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Mistrustful quantum cryptography is a large field and one of the major applications envisaged for a global quantum internet. It includes important tasks like bit commitment, coin flipping, oblivious transfer and secure computations. We identify [1] new multi-photon attacks on practical implementations of mistrustful quantum cryptography with photonic setups, and show that some previous implementations were vulnerable. We illustrate the power of these attacks with an experiment. We also discuss side-channel attacks where Alice controls further degrees of freedom or sends other physical systems. [1] M. Bozzio, A. Cavaillès, E. Diamanti, A. Kent and D. Pitalúa-García, “Multiphoton and side-channel attacks in mistrustful quantum cryptography”, PRX Quantum 2, 030338 (2021).
Break
Lunch Break 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM
Session 2: Free-space Quantum Communication
In person: 28 September 2021 • 2:00 PM - 3:40 PM BST | Lomond Auditorium
Session Chair: Joseph Ho, Heriot-Watt Univ. (United Kingdom)
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Author(s): Jasminder Sidhu, Univ. of Strathclyde (United Kingdom); Shuro Izumi, Jonas S. Neergaard-Nielsen, Technical Univ. of Denmark (Denmark); Cosmo Lupo, The Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom); Ulrik Andersen, Technical Univ. of Denmark (Denmark)
On demand | Presented Live 28 September 2021
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Quantum enhanced receivers are endowed with resources to achieve higher sensitivities than conventional technologies. For application in optical communications, they provide improved discriminatory capabilities for multiple non-orthogonal quantum states. In this work, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a new decoding scheme for quadrature phase-shift encoded signals. Our receiver surpasses the standard quantum limit and outperforms all previously known non-adaptive detectors at low input powers. Unlike existing approaches, the receiver only exploits linear optical elements and on-off photo-detection. This circumvents the requirement for challenging feed-forward operations that limit communication transmission rates and can be readily implemented with current technology.
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Author(s): Jasminder Sidhu, Thomas Brougham, Duncan McArthur, Roberto Pousa, Daniel Oi, Univ. of Strathclyde (United Kingdom)
On demand | Presented Live 28 September 2021
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Developing global quantum communication networks is integral to the realisation of the quantum internet, which is expected to impart a similar revolutionary impact on the technological landscape as the classical internet. Satellite-based quantum communications provides a practical route to global quantum networking. In this work, we model finite statistics to determine the finite secret key length generation in SatQKD systems that implement trusted-node downlink operation with weak coherent pulse sources. We optimise the finite key rate for different practical operations and determine the key generation footprints. Our work provides an essential guide for future satellite missions to establish performance benchmarks for both sources and detectors.
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Author(s): David Lowndes, Univ. of Bristol (United Kingdom); Andy Schreier, Dominic C. O'Brien, Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); John G. Rarity, Univ. of Bristol (United Kingdom)
On demand | Presented Live 28 September 2021
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We present a miniaturised free-space quantum key distribution (QKD) system which allows key exchange between a handheld transmitter and a fixed terminal. The QKD system requires to be optically aligned emphasising the need of a beamsteering unit for later applications. To maintain within the size, weight and power restrictions, the active beamsteering hardware is exclusively located inside the receiver. Our target is consumer use so we present rigorous characterisation against a range of background light levels to show anticipated performance outside of a laboratory environment. Experimental results show a reduction in the raw count rate commensurate with the transmission of the added components (74.5\%) and a small degradation of the error rate (0.5 percentage points) due to the worse signal-to-noise ratio. These combine to a 50\% reduction in estimated secret key rate of the system with the additional components for beam steering.
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Author(s): Thomas Brougham, Daniel Oi, Univ. of Strathclyde (United Kingdom)
On demand | Presented Live 28 September 2021
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Medium-range terrestrial free-space quantum key distribution systems enable widespread secure networked communications in dense urban environments, where it would be infeasible to install a large number of short optical fibre links. Such networks need to perform over a wide range of conditions and their design has to balance key rate maximisation versus robust key generation over the greatest range of circumstances. Practicalities, such as manufacturability and deployment, further constrain the design space. Here, we examine challenges in translating experiment into engineering reality and identify efficient BB84 weak coherent pulse-decoy state protocol parameter regimes suitable for medium-range QKD systems considering likely system performance and environmental conditions.
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Author(s): Alfonso Tello Castillo, Ross J. Donaldson, Heriot-Watt Univ. (United Kingdom)
On demand | Presented Live 28 September 2021
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The use of free-space channels for QKD has risen in popularity in recent years, primarily due to the global coverage potential using satellite platforms. However, free-space channels come with challenges that need to be addressed, such as; diffraction loss, background noise, pointing-and-tracking, and atmospheric aberration. Novel design and the use of state-of-the-art detector technologies in quantum receivers can help alleviate these difficulties. This paper presents and discusses the implementation of 2D single-photon sensor technology for free-space quantum key distribution. We present an experimental method that utilizes independent single-photon avalanche diode pixel read-out to reduce background noise contributions while simultaneously increasing optical field-of-view. Finally, we show and discuss single-photon level beaconing capabilities for pointing and tracking.
Break
Coffee Break 3:40 PM - 4:10 PM
Session 3: Quantum Networking and Advanced Protocols
In person: 28 September 2021 • 4:10 PM - 5:30 PM BST | Lomond Auditorium
Session Chair: Daniel Oi, Univ. of Strathclyde (United Kingdom)
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Author(s): Bernard H. L. Lee, SENKO Advanced Components Ltd. (Hong Kong, China); Richard C. A. Pitwon, Resolute Photonics Ltd. (United Kingdom)
On demand | Presented Live 28 September 2021
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Optical interconnect technology has been evolving for over half a century. Today approximately one billion optical connectors and interconnects are deployed annually, and the growth is expected to increase as more technologies adopt optical and photonic components. Although its basic function (the conveyance of photons over a channel) has remained the same, optical interconnect has been constantly evolving and innovating over the decades to push the boundaries of performance. In this paper we report on the evolution of optical interconnect technology from its initial applications in long haul telecommunications links to its future application to quantum networks.
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Author(s): Joseph Ho, Massimiliano Proietti, Heriot-Watt Univ. (United Kingdom); Federico Grasselli, Heinrich-Heine-Univ. Düsseldorf (Germany); Alexander Pickston, Peter Barrow, Andres Ulibarrena, Mehul Malik, Alessandro Fedrizzi, Heriot-Watt Univ. (United Kingdom)
On demand | Presented Live 28 September 2021
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Future quantum networks will provide multi-node entanglement enabling secure quantum communication on a global scale. Traditional two-party quantum key distribution (2QKD) consumes pairwise entanglement which is costly in constrained networks. Quantum conference key agreement (QCKA) leverages multipartite entanglement within networks to directly produce identical keys among N users, providing up to N-1 rate advantage over 2QKD. Here, we present a four-user QCKA protocol using photonic GHZ states distributed over fibre with combined lengths up to 50 km. Furthermore, we investigate a constrained network consisting of a 6-qubit photonic graph state which we apply network coding routines to distil suitable resource states.
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Author(s): Damián Pitalúa-García, Adrian Kent, Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom); David Lowndes, John G. Rarity, Univ. of Bristol (United Kingdom)
On demand | Presented Live 28 September 2021
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Author(s): Marcus J. Clark, Obada Alia, Rodrigo S. Tessinari, Rui Wang, Djeylan Aktas, George T. Kanellos, John G. Rarity, Reza Nejabati, Dimitra E. Simeonidou, Siddarth K. Joshi, Univ. of Bristol (United Kingdom)
On demand | Presented Live 28 September 2021
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Quantum networks have begun to connect many users together with Quantum Key Distribution links. We present a scalable, full mesh, polarisation entanglement-based quantum network without trusted nodes. We discuss our progress towards building a dynamic quantum network with more users, long distance (≈50 km) links and improved polarisation stability in the optical fibres. Lastly, minimising the resource overhead and optimising the network control based on end-user requirements are important features we are incorporating into our network.
Wednesday Plenary Session
In person: 29 September 2021 • 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM BST | Lomond Auditorium
09:00: Welcome, Introduction, and Special Announcement
David Andrews, SPIE President, Univ. of East Anglia (United Kingdom)

09:20: Understanding the Role of Photonics in a Changing World

Carol Monaghan, Member of the Science and Technology Select Committee, Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology (board member), Industry and Parliament Trust (board member), Chair of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Photonics and Quantum, Vice Chair All Party Parliamentary Group on Space (United Kingdom)

For decades, the photonics industry has been at the forefront of global innovation and research. Developments such as advanced LIDAR systems for autonomous vehicles, secure quantum computers and 5G communications, ensure that this sector remains as relevant as ever with the potential for major growth across multiple technologies. However increased threats to national security mean that the importance of this industry goes beyond basic economics. Set against a backdrop of a challenging funding landscape, can governments really afford not to invest in photonics and quantum?

Carol Monaghan graduated from the University of Strathclyde in 1993 with a BSc (Hons) in Laser Physics and Optoelectronics before training as a physics teacher. Her 20-year teaching career included 14 years as Head of Physics and Science at Hyndland Secondary. Carol was first elected as the MP for Glasgow North West in 2015 and re-elected in 2017 and 2019. She is the SNP’s Westminster Spokesperson for Education, Armed Forces and Veterans.

09:45: Question & Answer with Carol Monaghan

09:55: Welcome by Lord Provost of the City of Glasgow

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Author(s): Carol Monaghan, UK Parliament (United Kingdom)
In person: 29 September 2021 • 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM BST | Lomond Auditorium
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For decades, the photonics industry has been at the forefront of global innovation and research. Developments such as advanced LIDAR systems for autonomous vehicles, secure quantum computers and 5G communications, ensure that this sector remains as relevant as ever with the potential for major growth across multiple technologies. However increased threats to national security mean that the importance of this industry goes beyond basic economics. Set against a backdrop of a challenging funding landscape, can governments really afford not to invest in photonics and quantum?
Break
Coffee Break 10:00 AM - 10:30 AM
Session 4: Silicon Photonics in Quantum Technologies: Joint Session with Conferences 11880 and 11881
In person: 29 September 2021 • 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM BST | Lomond Auditorium
Session Chair: Callum G. Littlejohns, Univ. of Southampton (United Kingdom)
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Author(s): Stephen P. Najda, P. Perlin, T. Suski, TopGaN Ltd. (Poland); Szymon Stanczyk, Institute of High Pressure Physics (Poland); M. Leszczynski, D. Schiavon, TopGaN Ltd. (Poland); T. Slight, Sivers Photonics Ltd. (United Kingdom); S. Gwyn, S. Watson, A. E. Kelly, Univ. of Glasgow (United Kingdom); M. Knapp, M. Haji, National Physical Lab. (United Kingdom)
On demand | Presented Live 29 September 2021
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GaN laser diodes have the potential to be a key enabler for many quantum technologies since the AlGaInN material system allows for laser diodes to be fabricated over a wide range of wavelengths from ultra-violet to visible. Novel applications for quantum technologies include GaN laser sources for cold-atom interferometry, such as optical atomic clocks, quantum sensors and quantum computing. GaN allows the development of very high specification laser diode sources that are portable, robust and provide practical solutions that are otherwise unobtainable using more conventional laser sources. Several approaches are taken to achieve the required linewidth, wavelength and power for cold-atom interferometry, including an extended cavity GaN laser diode (ECLD) system, and a distributed feedback (DFB) GaN laser diode with side-wall etched nano-gratings. We report our latest results on GaN laser diodes for quantum technologies.
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Author(s): Krishna Coimbatore Balram, Univ. of Bristol (United Kingdom)
In person: 29 September 2021 • 10:50 AM - 11:10 AM BST | Lomond Auditorium
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Adapting existing foundry platforms for applications in quantum photonics presents an exciting research challenge, as these platforms were not originally designed with 'quantum' applications in mind, in particular, the choice of materials, the need for high efficiency and extreme operating temperatures. In this talk, I will discuss our efforts towards this goal on three different front: incorporating atom-like systems in a SiN PIC platform, development of MEMS based phase shifters in a standard silicon photonics process with a view towards cryogenic operation of large scale PICs, and finally our work towards building quantum microwave to optical signal transducers using MEMS foundry designed high overtone bulk acoustic wave resonators.
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Author(s): Ross W. Millar, Jaroslaw Kirdoda, Univ. of Glasgow (United Kingdom); Fiona E. Thorburn, Xin Yi, Zoë Greener, Laura L. Huddleston, Heriot-Watt Univ. (United Kingdom); Bhavana Benakaprasad, Scott Watson, Conor Coughlan, Univ. of Glasgow (United Kingdom); Gerald S. Buller, Heriot-Watt Univ. (United Kingdom); Douglas J. Paul, Univ. of Glasgow (United Kingdom)
On demand | Presented Live 29 September 2021
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Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) detectors are key for numerous quantum and 3D imaging applications and operation in the short-wave infrared (SWIR) is either essential or beneficial for such applications. Here, we present a 26µm diameter, pseudo-planar Ge-on-Si SPAD, which exhibits record low noise-equivalent-power (NEP) of 7.7×10−17WHz−1/2 at 1310nm wavelength (125K). The devices have dark-count-rates as low as kilocounts/s at 100K and single photon detection efficiencies up to ~29%. These results represent a 2 orders-of-magnitude improvement in NEP compared to previous 25 µm Ge-on-Si mesa SPADs and demonstrate the potential for efficient Si compatible SPADs operating in the SWIR.
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Author(s): Ségolène Olivier, CEA-LETI (France)
In person: 29 September 2021 • 11:30 AM - 11:50 AM BST | Lomond Auditorium
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Silicon photonics based on CMOS technology is a very attractive platform to build compact, low-cost and scalable quantum photonics integrated circuits addressing the requirements of advanced quantum key distribution protocols and photonic quantum processing schemes. We show record low propagation losses below 0.5 dB/cm and below 0.05 dB/cm for silicon and silicon nitride waveguides respectively. We will present our latest results on integrated components such as high-quality microresonators for heralded single photon generation and we will show our recent developments on high crystalline quality NbN thin films with improved critical temperature for waveguide-integrated superconducting single photon detectors.
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Author(s): James Brown, Hamamatsu Photonics UK Ltd. (United Kingdom)
In person: 29 September 2021 • 11:50 AM - 12:10 PM BST | Lomond Auditorium
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Hamamatsu introduces their new scientific camera – the ORCA-Quest®, with incredibly low noise of 0.27 electrons rms and a high pixel count of 9.4 megapixels. In quantitative imaging, the photoelectric noise generated when light is converted into electrical signals is the all-important factor that determines the lower detection limit of a camera. The ORCA-Quest is able to reduce this photoelectric noise to a level below the signals generated by photons, making it the world’s first camera to achieve 2D photon-number-resolving measurement, meaning that it accurately measures the number of photons within each pixel.
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Author(s): Richard C. A. Pitwon, Resolute Photonics Ltd. (United Kingdom); Bernard H. L. Lee, SENKO Advanced Components (Euro) Ltd. (United Kingdom)
On demand | Presented Live 29 September 2021
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Quantum technologies are progressing to market faster than anticipated with commercial and consumer applications starting to emerge. The rapid development of quantum capability is also being fueled by a geopolitical competition centred on quantum communication and computation. Standardisation will accelerate commercial adoption of emerging technologies by establishing commonly agreed frameworks, terminologies, design guidelines and performance benchmarks by which to apply the technology. In this paper we report on the nascent activities in mainstream international standards bodies to standardize different aspects of quantum technologies and identify where standards will be most relevant and will not impede future innovation.
Break
Lunch Break/Exhibition 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM
Session 5: Quantum Sensors for Fundamental Physics I
In person: 29 September 2021 • 2:00 PM - 3:50 PM BST | Lomond Auditorium
Session Chair: Ian P. J. Shipsey, Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)
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Author(s): Silke Weinfurtner, The Univ. of Nottingham (United Kingdom)
In person: 29 September 2021 • 2:00 PM - 2:30 PM BST | Lomond Auditorium
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The dynamics of the early universe and black holes are fundamental reflections of the interplay between general relativity and quantum fields. The essential physical processes occur when gravitational interactions are strong, and quantum effects are important. These situations are difficult to observe and impossible to experiment with. Further, current theoretical predictions for these regimes are based on major extrapolations of laboratory-tested physics. In many of these extreme regimes, existing theoretical approaches are based on approximations and are thus highly limited in the range of observable phenomena for which they are able to provide predictions. The pressing need for experimental verification of these ideas coincides with huge experimental advances by the quantum technology community. We propose to unite the quantum technology and fundamental physics communities to merge these strands of investigation by employing analogue quantum simulators.
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Author(s): Edward Daw, The Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom)
In person: 29 September 2021 • 2:30 PM - 2:50 PM BST | Lomond Auditorium
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Quantum electronics is a key technology for precision experiments searching for particles in the so-called hidden sector, where very light fields that have feeble couplings to ordinary matter and ordinary detectors might be detectable with modern techniques. The Quantum Sensors for the Hidden Sector collaboration, funded by the Science and Technology Facilities Council, aims to build a strong UK capability in this area, with a view to establishing a UK based facility for development of sensitive detectors. After an introduction to the hidden sector, the talk will cover capabilities and interests within the group, collaborative work with the ADMX collaboration, and progress so far.
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Author(s): Giovanni Barontini, Vincent Boyer, Univ. of Birmingham (United Kingdom); Xavier Calmet, University of Sussex (United Kingdom); Noah J. Fitch, Imperial College (United Kingdom); E M. Forgan, Univ. of Birmingham (United Kingdom); Rachel M. Godun, National Physical Laboratory (United Kingdom); Jon Goldwin, Vera Guarrera, Univ. of Birmingham (United Kingdom); Ian R. Hill, National Physical Laboratory (United Kingdom); Minki Jeong, Univ. of Birmingham (United Kingdom); Matthias Keller, Folkert Juipers, University of Sussex (United Kingdom); Helen S. Margolis, National Physical Laboratory (United Kingdom); Paul Newman, Leonid Prokhorov, Univ. of Birmingham (United Kingdom); J Rodewald, Ben E. Sauer, Imperial College (United Kingdom); Marco Schioppo, National Physical Laboratory (United Kingdom); Nathan Sherrill, University of Sussex (United Kingdom); Michael R. Tarbutt, Imperial College (United Kingdom); Alberto Vecchio, Steven Worm, Univ. of Birmingham (United Kingdom)
On demand | Presented Live 29 September 2021
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The QSNET consortium is building a UK network of next-generation atomic and molecular clocks that will achieve unprecedented sensitivity in testing variations of the fine structure constant, α, and the proton-to-electron mass ratio, μ. This in turn will provide more stringent constraints on a wide range of fundamental and phenomenological theories beyond the Standard Model and on dark matter models.
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Author(s): Denis Martynov, Univ. of Birmingham (United Kingdom); Robert Hadfield, University of Glasgow (United Kingdom)
In person: 29 September 2021 • 3:10 PM - 3:30 PM BST | Lomond Auditorium
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The Standard Model has been extremely successful in making experimental predictions in the past decades, yet leaves some key phenomena unexplained. In the talk, I will discuss a new initiative "Quantum-enhanced Interferometry for New Physics" funded by STFC/EPSRC "Quantum Technologies for Fundamental Physics" scheme. We use the recent advanced in quantum technologies and address two pressing questions facing modern physics: (i) what is the nature of dark matter and (ii) how quantum mechanics can be united with Einstein’s theory of relativity? I will discuss four tabletop experiments developed by the consortium of five UK universities (Cardiff, Birmingham, Glasgow, Strathclyde, and Warwick) and the expected outputs of the initiative.
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Author(s): Mitchell Perry, Edward Daw, The Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom); Chelsea Bartram, Univ. of Washington (United States)
In person: 29 September 2021 • 3:30 PM - 3:50 PM BST | Lomond Auditorium
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Axions are a well motivated candidate for dark matter. We describe novel resonant feedback techniques [1] aimed at increasing the rate of coverage of axion masses, current development progress and current development aims. [1] Edward J. Daw. Resonant feedback for axion and hidden sector dark matter searches. Nucl. Instrum. Meth. A, 921:50–56, 2019. doi: 10.1016/j.nima.2018.12.039.
Break
Coffee Break/Poster Session 3:50 PM - 4:20 PM
Poster Session
In person: 29 September 2021 • 3:50 PM - 4:20 PM BST | Exhibition Hall 4
Poster authors will be available during the Wednesday afternoon coffee break to further engage with their research in front of their posters.
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Author(s): Javier Navarro Montilla, Boon-Kok Tan, Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)
On demand | Presented Live 29 September 2021
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Broadband ultra-low noise amplification is important for many fundamental physics experiments. In our case, we aim to develop a quantum limited Josephson Travelling Wave Parametric Amplifier (JTWPA) for dark matter search experiments. In this paper, we focus on the development of the JTWPA, in particular to optimise the performance of the amplifier with a simplified fabrication prospect. We present our methodology for the optimisation process, focusing on three important aspects, namely utilising the minimal number of tunnel junction required, maximising the operational bandwidth and achieving a 50 Ω characteristic impedance. We demonstrate that our optimised model requires 4× less tunnel junctions compared to the conventional model, and we are able to improve the operational bandwidth by 68% while maintaining the characteristic impedance of the device at 50 Ω.
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Author(s): Rachel Elvin, Michael W. Wright, Ben Lewis, Aidan S. Arnold, Paul F. Griffin, Erling Riis, Univ. of Strathclyde (United Kingdom)
In person: 29 September 2021 • 3:50 PM - 4:20 PM BST | Exhibition Hall 4
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We present recent progress of a microwave atomic clock experiment that is based on a Rb grating magneto-optical trap (GMOT) as a source of cold atoms, and the coherent population trapping (CPT) technique for probing the clock frequency. The GMOT provides around 10^7 trapped rubidium atoms from a single expanded cooling beam that are then cooled to sub-Doppler temperatures of >20 uK. The atoms are probed during ballistic expansion using Ramsey-CPT in a lin⏊lin polarisation scheme to measure a fringe linewidth of 50 Hz. This provides the means for sensitive frequency measurements, allowing us to characterize the performance of our apparatus.
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Author(s): Nicola Bilton, Aisha Kaushik, Teodor Krastev, Keyu He, Henry Sewell, Shengan Shi, Joseph Cotter, Edward A. Hinds, Imperial College London (United Kingdom)
On demand | Presented Live 29 September 2021
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We report our recent work extending the operation of our laboratory-scale cold atom accelerometer into a rotation sensor. Laser light is used to cool, trap and manipulate clouds of rubidium atoms and make an interferometer that is sensitive to the local rotation rate because of the Sagnac effect. We have two orthogonal sensors, which combined can measure rotations about three axes.
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Author(s): Maryam Nikkhou, Yanhui Hu, James Sabin, James Millen, King's College London (United Kingdom)
On demand | Presented Live 29 September 2021
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Many quantum technologies, particularly those based on ultra-cold atoms, require ultra high vacuum (UHV) to operate, and an accurate knowledge of the UHV pressure is necessary for precise calibration and operation. However, pressure metrology is extremely challenging in UHV, with commercial solutions providing an accuracy of a few percent at best. The aim of this work is to develop a pressure sensor with a sensitivity at least three orders-of-magnitude higher than commercial sensors in UHV using a nanoparticle levitated in an optical field. Our sensing scheme exploits a degree-of-freedom, rotation, which is only available to levitated sensors. Rotation is only controllable in non-spherical particles. To this end, silicon nanorods are fabricated using top-down lithography and etching techniques, with a breaking point at the bottom. To load nanoparticles into an optical trap we have developed and characterized a clean, vacuum compatible method based on laser-induced acoustic desorption.
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Author(s): Ling Hao, Jamie Potter, National Physical Lab. (United Kingdom)
In person: 29 September 2021 • 3:50 PM - 4:20 PM BST | Exhibition Hall 4
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We present a SLUG microwave amplifier design, using a lumped circuit model in Python. Calculated I-V and V-phi characteristics show good agreement with other authors. Model results for microwave gain and reverse isolation show compatibility with the NPL/UCL nanobridge technology which exhibits good microwave response to > 50GHz. Results for this extended frequency range are included. For both hidden sector and neutrino mass experiments, correct matching of the SLUG input to a microwave resonator and onward coupling to a HEMT amplifier are required and data is reported for measurements made at 3K. The final system will operate at 20-30mK.
Session 6: Quantum Sensors for Fundamental Physics II
In person: 29 September 2021 • 4:20 PM - 5:50 PM BST | Lomond Auditorium
Session Chair: Sonja Franke-Arnold, Univ. of Glasgow (United Kingdom)
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Author(s): Mark G. Bason, STFC Rutherford Appleton Lab. (United Kingdom)
On demand | Presented Live 29 September 2021
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The Atom Interferometer Observatory and Network is an experimental programme that uses quantum sensors to search for ultra-light dark matter, explore mid-frequency gravitational waves and probe other frontiers in fundamental physics. Having launched recently, seven UK institutions plan to construct a series of atom interferometers with baselines stretching from 10 m to 1 km. This talk will discuss key quantum technology challenges and the potential for transferring technology into new commercial devices. In addition, I will highlight areas in which industry collaboration will be needed to develop solutions that maximise the performance of future quantum detectors.
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Author(s): Ruben Saakyan, Ryan Nichol, Univ. College London (United Kingdom)
In person: 29 September 2021 • 4:50 PM - 5:10 PM BST | Lomond Auditorium
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Quantum Technologies for Neutrino Mass (QTNM) is one of the 7 projects recently funded by the UKRI QTFP programme aimed at harnessing recent breakthroughs in quantum technologies to assess the feasibility of an experiment capable to measure the neutrino mass down to 10-40 meV level. To accomplish this goal QTNM will employ a novel technology known as Cyclotron Radiation Emission Spectroscopy (CRES) pioneered by the Project 8 experiment.
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Author(s): Benjamin D. Wood, Gavin W. Morley, The Univ. of Warwick (United Kingdom)
On demand | Presented Live 29 September 2021
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We are building an experiment in which a nitrogen-vacancy-centre electron spin would be used to put a levitated nanodiamond into a spatial quantum superposition. This would be able to test theories of spontaneous wavefunction collapse and is the first step of a much more ambitious experiment to test if gravitational effects can be in a quantum superposition. This talk will describe our improved experimental design and early experimental progress.
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Author(s): Peter F. Barker, Fiona Alder, Jonathan Gosling, Robert James, Chamkaur Ghag, Univ. College London (United Kingdom)
In person: 29 September 2021 • 5:30 PM - 5:50 PM BST | Lomond Auditorium
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Levitated quantum optomechanics is a new platform for performing fundamental tests of physics[1,2]. The isolation afforded by levitation in vacuum, coupled with the ability to cool particles to the quantum ground state, opens up the potential for extremely sensitive measurements of weak forces at both short and long range. We describe the use of much smaller levitated nanoparticles (10-18 kg) for composite dark matter searches in the 0.1-1 GeV range. We outline the cooling and trapping methods used to prepare these nanoscale oscillators and present initial results from a profile likelihood ratio analysis of the experiment, capable of resolving collisions in all three dimensions. We discuss the impact of incorporating directionality on the projected sensitivity of the experiment at longer exposures.
Thursday Plenary Session
In person: 30 September 2021 • 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM BST | Lomond Auditorium
09:00: Welcome and Introduction
David Andrews, SPIE President, Univ. of East Anglia (United Kingdom)

09:20: Strengthening Our Superpowers: Technology, Missions, and the UK Innovation Strategy


Simone Boekelaar, Innovate UK (United Kingdom)

What does HMG’s new Innovation Strategy tell us about how this government will intervene to promote emerging tech, and what it wants to achieve by doing so? What might this look like from the photonics’ sector’s perspective? A chance to hear about the evolution and objectives of the governments’ new innovation strategy, along with potential plans for implementation and industry engagement.

Simone Boekelaar is the Head of Horizon Scanning at Innovate UK, the UK government’s innovation agency. With a background in economics and engineering, Simone leads a team that scans for the emerging technologies and trends that will be most impactful on UK industry in 2030 and beyond. From health diagnostics to entertainment, from space travel to manufacturing glass bottles, Simone and her team scour the academic and industrial worlds to seek out the under-supported and overlooked technologies and trends likely to be critical to all our futures.

09:45: Question & Answer with Simone Boekelaar
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Author(s): Simone Boekelaar, Innovate UK (United Kingdom)
In person: 30 September 2021 • 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM BST | Lomond Auditorium
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What does HMG’s new Innovation Strategy tell us about how this government will intervene to promote emerging tech, and what it wants to achieve by doing so? What might this look like from the photonics’ sector’s perspective? A chance to hear about the evolution and objectives of the governments’ new innovation strategy, along with potential plans for implementation and industry engagement.
Break
Coffee Break 10:00 AM - 10:30 AM
Session 7: Quantum Sensors for Quantum Technologies I
In person: 30 September 2021 • 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM BST | Lomond Auditorium
Session Chair: Kai Bongs, Univ. of Birmingham (United Kingdom)
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Author(s): Jack Saywell, Max Carey, Nikolaos Dedes, Ilya Kuprov, Tim Freegarde, Univ. of Southampton (United Kingdom)
On demand | Presented Live 30 September 2021
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We introduce a general optimal control approach that permits the design of robust and efficient pulses and pulse sequences for a range of atom interferometer geometries including simple three-pulse interferometers and large-momentum-transfer sequences. Using simulations, we demonstrate a significant increase in the efficiency and robustness of our tailored pulse sequences to performance-limiting variations in atomic velocity and laser intensity. Our technique enables more complex interferometer geometries to be explored by increasing the efficiency and robustness of the constituent pulses. Crucially, our pulse shapes are smooth and straightforward to implement on existing hardware.
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Author(s): Matthias Keller, Xavier Fernandez Gonzalvo, Univ. of Sussex (United Kingdom)
In person: 30 September 2021 • 10:50 AM - 11:10 AM BST | Lomond Auditorium
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In this presentation, the progress in the development of a compact optical atomic clock based on trapped calcium ions is presented. Using an all-fibre laser system and a fibre integrated ion trap, the entire system fits into a 4u 19” rack module with a weight of less than 20kg and a power consumption of less than 100W. Highly accurate optical reference systems have many interesting applications in industry and research. Systems with high accuracy are currently confined to research laboratories due to their size, weight, power consumption and complexity. We have developed a fully fibre based rugged optical reference system.
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Author(s): James Millen, King's College London (United Kingdom)
In person: 30 September 2021 • 11:10 AM - 11:30 AM BST | Lomond Auditorium
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Mechanical oscillators are ubiquitous in modern technology, particularly Micro-Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS). They are used for sensing, for example in the medical sector as blood pressure monitors, and for signal manipulation, such as the antennas in smartphones. MEMS devices are limited by the energy they dissipate as they flex, an issue that gets worse with decreasing size. We overcome this limitation by *levitating* the mechanical oscillator. Nanoparticles can be suspended by optical or electrical fields, where their low-dissipation motion makes them ideal sensors. We present a novel platform, where charged nanoparticles are levitated, detected and controlled by electrical fields in a chip-based platform. This system, that we dub Levitated Electromechanics, has the potential to participate in quantum technologies as a coherent stroage or transduction device.
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Author(s): Paulo Hisao Moriya, Jennifer E. Hastie, Institute of Photonics, Univ. of Strathclyde (United Kingdom)
In person: 30 September 2021 • 11:30 AM - 11:50 AM BST | Lomond Auditorium
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Red-emitting optically-pumped vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting-lasers (VECSELs) are an interesting platform for compact, low noise, and high spatial and spectral brightness laser systems targeting narrow linewidth transitions used in strontium-based optical clocks. Recently, we have demonstrated sub-kHz linewidth operation at 689 nm when pumped by either green or blue lasers. Here we report the development and characterisation of an AlGaInP-based VECSEL targeting ionic and neutral strontium-based optical clock transitions at 674 and 698 nm, respectively. Both systems have single frequency output powers >100 mW in a circularly-symmetric transverse mode, achieving sub-200 Hz linewidth with low-loss, single-stage frequency-stabilisation.
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Author(s): Carolyn O'Dwyer, Rachel Dawson, Ed Irwin, Marcin Mrozowski, Stuart J. Ingleby, Paul F. Griffin, Erling Riis, Univ. of Strathclyde (United Kingdom)
In person: 30 September 2021 • 11:50 AM - 12:10 PM BST | Lomond Auditorium
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The measurement of magnetic fields in the human body is already having a significant impact in a wide range of healthcare applications, from magnetoencephalography (MEG) to foetal-magnetocardiography, (MCG). Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) have long been the leaders in sensitive magnetic imaging but have significant drawbacks due to a fixed position with respect to the source and the requirement of cryogenic operating temperatures. Optically pumped magnetometers (OPMs) have been demonstrated as a promising alternative to SQUIDs; achieving comparable signal resolution and flexible configurations. We have developed a caesium zero-field OPM with a view to miniaturising this device for medical applications. Here we will present a single-beam setup using a microfabricated atomic vapour cell and custom electronics for low-noise operation which achieves femtoTesla-level sensitivity.
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Author(s): Joseph Cotter, Henry Sewell, Shengan Shi, Keyu He, Nicola Bilton, Teodor Krastev, Aisha Kaushik, Ed A. Hinds, Imperial College London (United Kingdom)
In person: 30 September 2021 • 12:10 PM - 12:30 PM BST | Lomond Auditorium
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We are developing cold atom quantum inertial sensors with very low bias and scale factor drift for future satellite-free-navigation systems. These systems offer potentially significant improvements in location accuracy at long times compared with existing inertial sensors. Here, we present our new, transportable one-axis accelerometer developed together with M Squared. This system includes the laser for atom cooling, trapping, and driving Raman transitions, together with a science chamber for atom interferometry, and all of the electronics and control systems packaged into a single 19” rack.
Break
Lunch Break 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM
Session 8: Quantum Sensors for Quantum Technologies II
In person: 30 September 2021 • 2:00 PM - 3:20 PM BST | Lomond Auditorium
Session Chair: Anke Lohmann, Anchored In Ltd. (United Kingdom), ESP Central Ltd. (United Kingdom)
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Author(s): Akhil Kallepalli, Univ. of Glasgow (United Kingdom); John Innes, Leonardo MW Ltd. (United Kingdom); Graham M. Gibson, Miles J. Padgett, Univ. of Glasgow (United Kingdom)
On demand | Presented Live 30 September 2021
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In recent years, alternatives to focal-plane detector arrays are being widely investigated. One of the most promising of these is single-pixel imaging techniques. This research successfully illustrates compressive sensing using single-pixel imaging techniques in high noise conditions. Hadamard patterns are projected into the far-field of the phased-array modulator source and used for robust reconstruction in conditions of poor signal-to-noise ratio. Our technique and methodology can be further applied to any spectral region where spatial light modulators or phased-array sources are available.
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Author(s): Alan Bregazzi, Sean Dyer, Paul F. Griffin, Univ. of Strathclyde (United Kingdom); David P. Burt, Univ. of Glasgow (United Kingdom), Kelvin Nanotechnology Ltd. (United Kingdom); Aidan S. Arnold, Erling Riis, Univ. of Strathclyde (United Kingdom); James McGilligan, Univ. of Glasgow (United Kingdom), Kelvin Nanotechnology Ltd. (United Kingdom)
On demand | Presented Live 30 September 2021
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A low-cost, mass-producible laser-cooling platform would have a transformative effect in the burgeoning field of quantum technologies and the wider research of atomic sensors. Recent advancements in the micro-fabrication of diffractive optics and vacuum apparatus have paved the way for a simple, stackable solution to the laser cooling of alkali atoms. In this paper we will highlight our recent investigations into a chip-scale, cold-atom platform, outlining our approach for on-chip wavelength referencing, examining a solution for imaging atoms in a planar stacked device, and finally discussing the limitations to passively pumped vacuum longevity. These results will be discussed in the context of an outlined road-map for the production and commercialisation of chip-scale, cold-atom sensors.
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Author(s): Patrick Bevington, National Physical Lab. (United Kingdom)
In person: 30 September 2021 • 2:40 PM - 3:00 PM BST | Lomond Auditorium
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Instruments based on radio-frequency inductive technologies (Magnetic Induction Tomography) create an exciting alternative to standard defect detection and object surveillance methods. The rf atomic magnetometer brings superior sensitivity to inductive measurements, in addition to a range of functionalities. The inductive response of an object to an oscillating magnetic field reveals information about its electrical conductivity and magnetic permeability. We demonstrate that it is possible to determine material composition by measuring the angular, frequency, and spatial dependence of the inductive response. Identification is performed by referencing the object's response to that from materials with mutually exclusive properties such as copper (high electric conductivity, negligible magnetic permeability) and ferrite (opposite). This technique uses the difference in object response generated by eddy currents and magnetisation. Possible applications are in security screening devices.
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Author(s): Peter J. Hobson, Michael Packer, Niall Holmes, Alister Davis, The Univ. of Nottingham (United Kingdom); Prashant Patel, Darragh Holmes, Robert Harrison, James Chalmers, Ben Styles, David Woolger, Magnetic Shields Ltd. (United Kingdom); Dom Sims, Matthew J. Brookes, Richard W. Bowtell, Mark Fromhold, The Univ. of Nottingham (United Kingdom)
On demand | Presented Live 30 September 2021
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We present a commercial magnetic shielding system that combines an optimised passive shield and newly-developed active field-generating coils, which account for the shield–coil interaction to provide unprecedented control of the interior magnetic field environment. This hybrid active–passive shielding system generates a large region of uniform, low-noise passive shielding that integrates with nine accurate actively-generated orthogonal magnetic fields. Compared to the current state-of-the-art, our system offers a maximised shielding efficiency, minimised shield-induced Johnson noise, and precise magnetic field generation. This system is an ideal test-bed and supply-chain component for numerous quantum technologies.
Break
Coffee Break 3:20 PM - 3:50 PM
Session 9: Quantum Technologies with Photons
In person: 30 September 2021 • 3:50 PM - 5:10 PM BST | Lomond Auditorium
Session Chair: Miles J. Padgett, Univ. of Glasgow (United Kingdom)
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Author(s): Adetunmise Dada, Taylor Shields, Univ. of Glasgow (United Kingdom); Shashi Prabhakar, Univ. of Glasgow (United Kingdom), Tampere Univ. (Finland); Mehdi Ebrahim, Gregor G. Taylor, Dmitry V. Morozov, Kleanthis Erotokritou, Univ. of Glasgow (United Kingdom); Shigehito Miki, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (Japan), Kobe Univ. (Japan); Masahiro Yabuno, Hirotaka Terai, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (Japan); Corin B. E. Gawith, Covesion Ltd. (United Kingdom), Optoelectronics Research Ctr., Univ. of Southampton (United Kingdom); Michael Kues, Leibniz Univ. Hannover (Germany); Lucia Caspani, Univ. of Strathclyde (United Kingdom); Robert H. Hadfield, Matteo Clerici, Univ. of Glasgow (United Kingdom)
On demand | Presented Live 30 September 2021
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Two-photon interference and entanglement are among the key building blocks of quantum technologies. Quantum-enhanced optical systems operating within the 2-μm spectral region have the potential to revolutionize emerging applications in communications, sensing and metrology. However, until now, sources of entangled photons have mainly been developed in the visible and telecom spectral windows (≲1550 nm). Here, using custom-designed non-linear crystals for spontaneous parametric down-conversion and tailored superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPD), we show two-photon quantum interference and polarization entanglement in the mid infrared, at ≃ 2.1 μm.
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Author(s): Sara Restuccia, Graham M. Gibson, Leroy Cronin, Miles J. Padgett, Univ. of Glasgow (United Kingdom)
On demand | Presented Live 30 September 2021
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Optical activity is a macroscopic property of chiral molecules which manifests as a rotation of the plane of linear polarization when this light passes through a sample. We have developed a compact Bell inequality experiment for quantum probing of chiral liquids, based on polarization measurements. In particular we show that we can use a Bell-type inequality configuration to measure the optical activity of D-Limonene, a chiral molecule which is a major component in the oil of citrus fruit peels.
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Author(s): Joseph C. Longden, Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Faouzi M. Boussaha, Christine Chaumont, Galaxies Etoiles Physique Instrumentation, Observatoire de Paris, Univ. PSL (France); Kitti Ratter, Boon-Kok Tan, Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)
On demand | Presented Live 30 September 2021
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Travelling wave parametric amplifiers (TWPAs) made from highly nonlinear reactive superconducting thin films have been demonstrated to be a viable quantum technology for various quantum application platforms, including fundamental physics experiments such as astronomy and qubit readout, as well as commercial applications like quantum computational and communication systems. We present a kinetic inductance TWPA comprising a patterned titanium nitride film that can operate at 0.3K to demonstrate the feasibility of operation at higher bath temperatures. We shall discuss in detail the design of our TWPA, presenting the predicted gain-bandwidth characteristic and compare that with the preliminary experimental results.
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CANCELED: Programmable quantum photonic processor based on integrated Silicon Nitride waveguides
On demand | Presented Live 30 September 2021
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Photonics integration is a key technology for realizing large-scale photonic quantum information processing. We demonstrate state-of-art reconfigurable photonic processors based on low-loss silicon nitride waveguide networks. We present the science behind such a processor, which consists of a large mesh of integrated reconfigurable Mach Zehnder interferometers. In this talk, we will present the newest results of the current generation of our programmable quantum photonic processors obtained by classical as well as quantum optical characterization. Furthermore, we show the challenges of scaling up quantum photonic processors and the range of potential applications of large-scale quantum information processing those will enable.
Conference Chair
Univ. of Glasgow (United Kingdom)
Conference Chair
Kai Bongs
Univ. of Birmingham (United Kingdom)
Conference Chair
Heriot-Watt Univ. (United Kingdom)
Conference Chair
Alberto Politi
Univ. of Southampton (United Kingdom)
Program Committee
Univ. of Glasgow (United Kingdom)
Program Committee
Univ. of Sussex (United Kingdom)
Program Committee
The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)
Program Committee
ESP Central Ltd. (United Kingdom)
Program Committee
Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)
Program Committee
Andreas Poppe
AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH (Austria)
Program Committee
Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)
Program Committee
Univ. Paderborn (Germany)
Program Committee
Timothy P. Spiller
Univ. of York (United Kingdom)
Program Committee
Anna Pappa
Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany)