18 - 22 August 2024
San Diego, California, US
Post-deadline submissions will be considered for the poster session, or oral session if space is available

Recently, there has been a rapid and significant progress in the field of UV and higher energy photonics (UV to EUV) due to the availability of new UV and high energy light sources. Nano-materials such as nucleotides and proteins known as the essential biomolecules in living cells and semiconducting or plasmonic materials used in advanced nano-devices are analyzed and detected, imaged, and/or manipulated with use of UV and higher energy photons. Starting from the material growth related aspects, this conference includes theories and novel concepts on UV and higher energy photonics. It also includes experiments and developments of methods and instruments and MATERIALS more specifically nanostructured materials, which are used as devices for applications in catalysis, nano-lithography, nano-imaging, disinfection, analytical sensing but also in nano-photonics, bio-medical photonics, materials sciences and green and environmental sciences.

We would like again this year to emphasis on environmental sciences and sustainability using high energy photons either through applications like decontamination by photocatalysis, disinfection and germicidal techniques using UV photons or sustainable absorbing or emitting materials (rare-earth free materials) as an example.

The chairs of the conference proudly announce that the Young-Scientist award will be given to two outstanding presentations respectively in oral and poster sessions. Successful candidates must convey significant scientific content with a demonstrated excellent style of presentation including questions and discussions. In addition, from 2020, potentially four contributed papers will be promoted to invited contribution.


UV and High Energy Materials and Light Sources
UV and Higher Energy Microscopy and Spectroscopy
Applications of UV, Deep UV, Vacuum UV, and Extreme UV Photonics
UV and Deep UV Biosensing and Analysis with UV and Higher Energy Photonics ;
In progress – view active session
Conference 13115

UV and Higher Energy Photonics: From Materials to Applications 2024

18 - 19 August 2024 | Conv. Ctr. Room 16A
View Session ∨
  • 1: UV and High Energy Materials and Light Sources I
  • 2: UV and High Energy Materials and Light Sources II
  • 3: UV and Higher Energy Microscopy and Spectroscopy I
  • 4: UV and Higher Energy Microscopy and Spectroscopy II
  • Sunday Evening Sustainability Plenary
  • Nanoscience + Engineering Plenary
  • 5: UV and Deep UV Biosensing and Analysis with UV and Higher Energy Photonics
  • 6: Applications of UV, Deep UV, Vacuum UV, and Extreme UV Photonics
  • 7: UV and Deep UV Environmental Related Applications
  • Featured Nobel Plenary
Session 1: UV and High Energy Materials and Light Sources I
18 August 2024 • 9:00 AM - 10:20 AM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 16A
Session Chair: Yong-Hoon Cho, KAIST (Korea, Republic of)
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Author(s): Jonghwan Kim, Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)
18 August 2024 • 9:00 AM - 9:30 AM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 16A
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In this work, we probe optoelectronic processes at a band edge in hBN by means of optical imaging and spectroscopy at deep ultraviolet frequencies. Our laser excitation spectroscopy shows that strong radiative recombination and carrier excitation processes originate from the pristine structure and the stacking faults in hBN. We further demonstrate prominent electroluminescence and photocurrent generation from hBN by fabricating vdW heterostructures with graphene electrodes.
13115-2
Author(s): Gilles Lérondel, Komla D. Nomenyo, Anisha Gokarna, Guy Houset, Univ. de Technologie Troyes (France)
18 August 2024 • 9:30 AM - 10:00 AM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 16A
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The capability of lighting is essential for modern society with an exponential increase of the lighting energy consumption versus the GPD per capita. White Light Emitting Device (LED) based on solid state lighting allows for a tremendous energy saving typically around of 70% as to compared with incandescent lighting and therefore constitutes a real breakthrough in terms of low consumption technology. The life span analysis is also very positive for LEDs. The remaining issue lies in the end life of the component and recycling. We will show during this presentation based on a comprehensive approach developed within a 4 years R&D research project called RECYLED, how this issue can be solved by considering alternative disassembling technique based on energy pulse fragmentation. The later technology applied to LED bulbs allows for a recycling rate of more than 80% far above the commonly used crushing technology in recycling. The end of the presentation will be devoted to an even more eco-friendly approach based on ZnO as a rare-earth free white emission and potentially easy soluble LED material.
13115-3
Author(s): ZhiTing Ye, Chia Chun Hu, Po Hsiang Tsai, Shen Fu Tseng, National Chung Cheng Univ. (Taiwan)
18 August 2024 • 10:00 AM - 10:20 AM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 16A
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Using flip-chip (FC) ultraviolet-C (UV–C) light-emitting diodes (FC UVC LEDs) as a light source. The most accurate of the five tested MDDs consisted of a FC UVC LED light source, a holder, and a quartz lenses (QL1) with a light divergence angle of 16°. When detecting human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) at concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 4 mg/mL, the coefficients of determination (R2) of absorbance and concentration at 279 nm were 0.9850 and 0.9870, respectively. The FC UVC LED MDD designed herein was not only cost-effective but also had a small footprint and is therefore highly portable. The proposed approach for the quantitative detection of HSA and BSA is useful for early kidney disease screening.
Break
Coffee Break 10:20 AM - 10:50 AM
Session 2: UV and High Energy Materials and Light Sources II
18 August 2024 • 10:50 AM - 12:10 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 16A
Session Chair: Gilles Lérondel, Univ. de Technologie Troyes (France)
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Author(s): Der-Hsien Lien, National Yang Ming Chiao Tung Univ. (Taiwan)
18 August 2024 • 10:50 AM - 11:20 AM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 16A
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In this talk, I will introduce an electroluminescent (EL) device that overcomes the Schottky barrier for efficient UV to IR emission based on a metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitor structure. It combines a MOS capacitor with a carbon nanotube network and transition-metal dichalcogenide monolayers. By applying AC voltage, it emits across a wide range of bandgaps, bypassing the need for energy level alignment. This device shows minimal dependence on Schottky barrier height, achieving bright EL in materials with varied thicknesses or mobilities. This AC EL via MOS capacitor device offers a new avenue for UV light sources and optoelectronic applications.
13115-5
Author(s): Yong-Hoon Cho, Gwang Kim, KAIST (Korea, Republic of); Hyun-Gyu Kim, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)
18 August 2024 • 11:20 AM - 11:50 AM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 16A
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GaN hexagonal microrod has been used for generating exciton-polaritons at room temperature. When a GaN microrod is excited by a laser, various photonic modes and polariton modes can be simultaneously generated. Here, we compared the optical characteristics of the Fabry-Perot mode and the whispering gallery mode generated in a GaN microrod and found a method for extracting a specific mode among various photonic modes in a GaN hexagonal microrod. Excitation spot size dependence of angle-resolved photoluminescence is carried out to investigate the tendency of photonic and polaritonic modes.
13115-6
Author(s): Michel Kazan, Hana Baroudi, Abdo Iskandar, Malek D. Tabbal, American Univ. of Beirut (Lebanon); Junze Zhou, Anisha Gokarna, Aurelien Bruyant, Gilles Lérondel, Univ. de Technologie Troyes (France)
18 August 2024 • 11:50 AM - 12:10 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 16A
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The effect of size on transitions between defect-induced magnetic phases in ZnO nanowires is investigated in a temperature range from 1.8 K to 300 K using calorimetric measurements of specific heat. The obtained results demonstrated interesting magnetic phenomena in unusual magnetic nanomaterials. At low temperatures, we observed isolated magnetic ions in nanowires of diameters 45-50 nm, and ferromagnetic phases in nanowires of diameters 85-100 nm. However, at higher temperatures, we observed multiple transitions between superparamagnetic phases in the thinner nanowires and multiple transitions between spin-glass phases in the thicker nanowires.
Break
Lunch Break 12:10 PM - 1:40 PM
Session 3: UV and Higher Energy Microscopy and Spectroscopy I
18 August 2024 • 1:40 PM - 3:10 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 16A
Session Chair: Atsushi Taguchi, Hokkaido Univ. (Japan)
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Author(s): Robert R. Alfano, The City Univ. of New York (United States); Shah Faisal B. Mazhar, The City College of New York (United States)
18 August 2024 • 1:40 PM - 2:20 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 16A
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This presentation enhances the understanding of the underlying mechanism behind the generation of higher harmonics from electronic self-phase modulation which is driven by the Electric Field E(t) of the optical, NIR, and MIR femtosecond light pulses to produce attosecond laser pulses and providing the direction to produce zeptosecond laser pulses. The HHG arises from driving the phase of the electric field, E(t) by itself to create HHG in form of odd Bessel functions in time of odd harmonics driven by laser pulse from the nonlinear refractive index of Kerr media, n2 (χ3) and extending to even HHG from n1 (χ2).The three characteristic features of HHG spectrum are initial decreasing harmonics, a plateau region of HHG, and cutoff frequency. We show theoretically in the EM Kerr electronic self-phase modulation (ESPM) model that the distinctive features of HHG arise mainly from the changes in the phase of the E(t) wave driven by the envelope of the laser pulse causing the cosine of the cosine squared for χ3 and the cosine of the cosine for χ2 in time. The outcomes are Bessel function expansions producing odd harmonics for n2 (χ3) and even harmonics for n1 (χ2).
13115-11
Author(s): Atsushi Taguchi, Hokkaido Univ. (Japan)
18 August 2024 • 2:20 PM - 2:50 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 16A
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Nanophotonic structures are crucial for controlling light at scales smaller than its wavelength. While designing for linear polarization is straightforward, creating nanostructures for helically structured light, like circularly polarized light and optical vortices, is challenging due to complex near-field chiral interactions with matters in helical electromagnetic fields. In this presentation, we apply topology optimization, an intelligent design approach, to create 3D nanogap antenna structures with outstanding chiroptical functionalities. With these structures, we demonstrate giant chiral dissymmetry (up to g = 1.70), polarization conversion around the Poincaré sphere, and circularly polarized far-field emission from a linear dipole embedded within the gap. Additionally, our in-depth analysis reveals a physical connection between the flow of spin angular momentum of light within the nanostructure and the local density of optical chirality. The insight, combined with our developed structures, offers a fresh perspective for engineering chiral nanophotonic structures and finds applications in circular dichroism spectroscopy in UV.
13115-9
Author(s): Sander Senhorst, Sven Weerdenburg, Yifeng Shao, Roland C. Horsten, Technische Univ. Delft (Netherlands); Wim M. J. Coene, Technische Univ. Delft (Netherlands), ASML Netherlands B.V. (Netherlands)
18 August 2024 • 2:50 PM - 3:10 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 16A
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Ptychography as a means of lensless imaging is used in wafer metrology applications using Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) light, where high quality optics are scarce. To obtain sufficient diffraction intensity, reflection geometries with shallow (ca. 20 degrees) grazing incidence angles are used, which require re-sampling the diffraction data in a process called tilted plane correction (TPC). The tilt angle used for TPC is currently obtained through either experimentally tricky calibration, manual estimation based on diffraction pattern symmetry, or numerical optimization, each with their own drawbacks. In this work we offer an alternative numerical optimization approach to TPC, where we use the flexibility offered by our Automatic Differentiation (AD)-based Ptychography approach to include the data resampling into the forward model to learn the tilt angle. We demonstrate fast convergence of the approach across a range of incidence angles on simulated and experimental data obtained on a high-harmonic generation (HHG) beamline.
Break
Coffee Break 3:10 PM - 3:40 PM
Session 4: UV and Higher Energy Microscopy and Spectroscopy II
18 August 2024 • 3:40 PM - 5:00 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 16A
Session Chair: Yi-Cheng Wang, Univ. of Illinois (United States)
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Author(s): Ryota Ishii, Mitsuru Funato, Yoichi Kawakami, Kyoto Univ. (Japan)
18 August 2024 • 3:40 PM - 4:10 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 16A
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Ultrawide-band-gap (UWBG) semiconductors have attracted much attention for deep-ultraviolet (DUV) photonics and high-power electronics. However, the physical understanding is in infancy, preventing the potential capacities of UWBG semiconductors to be drawn out. Therefore, the electronic and optical properties should be fully elucidated using such as DUV spectroscopy. Whereupon, another obstacle stands that DUV spectroscopy itself is immature. In the presentation, we therefore talk about the development of DUV scanning near-field optical microscope and the optoelectronic properties of AlN studied by DUV luminescence spectroscopy.
13115-8
Author(s): Yi-Cheng Wang, Univ. of Illinois (United States)
18 August 2024 • 4:10 PM - 4:40 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 16A
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Ensuring the safety of food remains a critical and persistent challenge globally. Each year around the world, nearly 600 million individuals fall ill from consuming contaminated food, leading to around 420,000 fatalities. Separately, fungal contaminations pose a major global challenge to food security. These issues also cause enormous economic burdens. This presentation discusses the potential of utilizing ultraviolet-light systems to tackle both issues, along with opportunities for further enhancement.
13115-12
Author(s): Yusuke Shiozaki, Osaka Univ. (Japan), Nanophoton Corp. (Japan); Katsumasa Fujita, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Satoshi Kawata, Osaka Univ. (Japan), Nanophoton Corp. (Japan)
18 August 2024 • 4:40 PM - 5:00 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 16A
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We propose a method for separating fluorescence and Raman spectra during photobleaching process. Since the spectral decomposition is based on many spectral data with different fluorescence intensities, the fluorescence and Raman spectra are successfully resolved. As a result, the method effectively reduces the fluorescence interference in Raman spectral measurements. The method was applied to highly fluorescent samples and Raman spectra measured using UV, visible, and near-infrared lasers were compared.
Sunday Evening Sustainability Plenary
18 August 2024 • 6:00 PM - 7:25 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 6A
Session Chair: Jennifer Barton, The Univ. of Arizona (United States)

6:00 PM - 6:05 PM:
Welcome and Opening Remarks
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Author(s): Joseph J. Berry, National Renewable Energy Lab. (United States)
18 August 2024 • 6:05 PM - 6:45 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 6A
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This talk will consider the future of metal halide perovskite (MHP) photovoltaic (PV) technologies as photovoltaic deployment reaches the terawatt scale. The requirements for significantly increasing PV deployment beyond current rates and what the implications are for technologies attempting to meet this challenge will be addressed. In particular how issues of CO2 impacts and sustainability inform near and longer-term research development and deployment goals for MHP enabled PV will be discussed. To facilitate this, an overview of current state of the art results for MHP based single junction, and multi-junctions in all-perovskite or hybrid configurations with other PV technologies will be presented. This will also include examination of performance of MHP-PVs along both efficiency and reliability axes for not only cells but also modules placed in context of the success of technologies that are currently widely deployed.
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Author(s): Alexandra Boltasseva, Purdue Univ. (United States)
18 August 2024 • 6:45 PM - 7:25 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 6A
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The recent advent of robust, refractory (having a high melting point and chemical stability at temperatures above 2000°C) photonic materials such as plasmonic ceramics, specifically, transition metal nitrides (TMNs), MXenes and transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) is currently driving the development of durable, compact, chip-compatible devices for sustainable energy, harsh-environment sensing, defense and intelligence, information technology, aerospace, chemical and oil & gas industries. These materials offer high-temperature and chemical stability, great tailorability of their optical properties, strong plasmonic behavior, optical nonlinearities, and high photothermal conversion efficiencies. This lecture will discuss advanced machine-learning-assisted photonic designs, materials optimization, and fabrication approaches for the development of efficient thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems, lightsail spacecrafts, and high-T sensors utilizing TMN metasurfaces. We also explore the potential of TMNs (titanium nitride, zirconium nitride) and TCOs for switchable photonics, high-harmonic-based XUV generation, refractory metasurfaces for energy conversion, high-power applications, photodynamic therapy and photochemistry/photocatalysis. The development of environmentally-friendly, large-scale fabrication techniques will be discussed, and the emphasis will be put on novel machine-learning-driven design frameworks that leverage the emerging quantum solvers for meta-device optimization and bridge the areas of materials engineering, photonic design, and quantum technologies.
Nanoscience + Engineering Plenary
19 August 2024 • 8:30 AM - 9:55 AM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 6A
Session Chair: Giovanni Volpe, Göteborgs Univ. (Sweden)

8:30 AM - 8:35 AM:
Welcome and Opening Remarks
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AI photonics (Plenary Presentation)
Author(s): Hui Cao, Yale Univ. (United States)
19 August 2024 • 8:35 AM - 9:15 AM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 6A
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Artificial intelligence (AI) techniques have boosted the capability of optical imaging, sensing, and communication. Concurrently, photonics facilitate the tangible realization of deep neural networks, offering potential benefits in terms of latency, throughput, and energy efficiency. In this talk, I will discuss our efforts in AI photonics with two examples. The first involves employing a convolutional neural network for achieving single-shot full-field measurement of optical signals. The second example pertains to implementing a deep neural network with a multiple-scattering system featuring structural nonlinearity, thereby enabling nonlinear computations using linear optics.
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Meta-optics for edge computing (Plenary Presentation)
Author(s): Jason G. Valentine, Vanderbilt Univ. (United States)
19 August 2024 • 9:15 AM - 9:55 AM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 6A
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With the proliferation of networked sensors and artificial intelligence, there is an increasing need for edge computing where data is processed at the sensor level to reduce bandwidth and latency while still preserving energy efficiency. In this talk, I will discuss how meta-optics can be used to implement computation for optical edge sensors, serving to off-load computationally expensive convolutional operations from the digital platform, reducing both latency and power consumption. I will discuss how meta-optics can augment, or replace, conventional imaging optics in achieving parallel optical processing across multiple independent channels for identifying, and classifying, both spatial and spectral features of objects.
Break
Coffee Break 9:55 AM - 10:30 AM
Session 5: UV and Deep UV Biosensing and Analysis with UV and Higher Energy Photonics
19 August 2024 • 10:30 AM - 12:10 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 16A
Session Chair: Sung-Jin Park, Univ. of Illinois (United States)
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Author(s): Ming Lun Tseng, Bo Ray Lee, Ting An Shu, Shang Jie Shen, Pei Ying Ho, Kuan-Heng Chen, Po Hsiang Hsu, Mao Feng Jiang, Jia Hua Lee, Yao-Wei Huang, National Yang Ming Chiao Tung Univ. (Taiwan)
19 August 2024 • 10:30 AM - 11:00 AM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 16A
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DUV light is of great importance in applications, including nanolithography, material science, and biology. Metasurfaces, comprising well-engineered nanoresonators, promise to improve DUV technologies due to their capability to manipulate light at the nanoscale. We present metasurfaces showing high-quality-factor resonance (high-Q) in the DUV range. We combined low-loss dielectric materials, resonance mode associated with the quasi-bound state in the continuum, and various device schemes to realize the DUV high-Q metasurfaces. We demonstrate metasurfaces with functionalities including imaging-based biosensing and high-Q optical charity. Fabrication and characterization of the high-Q metasurface will be reported. This work provides a platform to advance DUV nanophotonics in sensing, quantum optics, and nonlinear optics.
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Author(s): Atsushi Ono, Wataru Inami, Yoshimasa Kawata, Shizuoka Univ. (Japan)
19 August 2024 • 11:00 AM - 11:30 AM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 16A
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Recently, we achieved highly sensitive autofluorescence imaging of living HeLa cells using deep-UV SPR with the Kretschmann-Raether configuration. A buffer solution, such as N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES), is essential for observing living cells. Therefore, the refractive index of specimen layer is higher than that of the atmosphere. The commonly used quartz prism, which is generally used for exciting deep-UV SPR in the Kretschmann configuration, is not sufficient under aqueous conditions. In our research, we employed a high-refractive index prism made of sapphire. The deep-UV SPR excitation of an aluminum thin film through a sapphire prism was investigated theoretically and experimentally, revealing a 2.8-fold increase in fluorescence intensities. Deep-UV SPR enhanced the autofluorescence of cell structures, with yeast cells exhibiting particularly high sensitivity. Consequently, for water-immersed specimens, the sapphire prism-based Kretschmann configuration successfully excited SPR in the deep-UV.
13115-15
Author(s): Timea Frosch, Christian Domes, Juergen Popp, Leibniz-Institut für Photonische Technologien e.V. (Germany); Torsten Frosch, Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany)
19 August 2024 • 11:30 AM - 11:50 AM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 16A
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Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) enables individually optimized antibiotic levels for best efficacy. Deep-UV Raman spectroscopy was proven highly promising in antibiotic sensing for TDM. It is suitable for monitoring low-concentrated active ingredients in complex environments like body fluids, with detection limits as low as one-digit µM or mg/mL.
13115-16
Author(s): Yunshan Wang, Mohammad Mohammadi, Shuaihang Pan, Bo Zhao, The Univ. of Utah (United States)
19 August 2024 • 11:50 AM - 12:10 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 16A
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This study presents a biomolecule sensor utilizing ultraviolet plasmonic-enhanced native fluorescence, enhancing sensitivity and selectivity for detecting neurotransmitters (NTs). NTs, like monoamines, fluoresce weakly in the UV range. Plasmonic nanostructures, including aluminum hole arrays and corrosion-modified magnesium alloy, amplify UV fluorescence, and this biosensor improves NT detection, which is critical for understanding neurological disorders. Traditional methods lack multi-NT probing and molecule differentiation. Tested neurotransmitters include Tryptophan, Dopamine, and Norepinephrine, and DOPAC. Corrosion boosts fluorescence by 5.45 times in magnesium alloys. Multi-layered Silica microspheres increase sensitivity in comparison with the monolayer. This research highlights UV plasmonic-enhanced fluorescence's potential for distinguishing similar NT structures.
Break
Lunch Break 12:10 PM - 1:40 PM
Session 6: Applications of UV, Deep UV, Vacuum UV, and Extreme UV Photonics
19 August 2024 • 1:40 PM - 3:00 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 16A
Session Chair: Torsten Frosch, Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany)
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Author(s): Sung-Jin Park, Univ. of Illinois (United States), Eden Park Illumination, Inc. (United States), Cygnus Photonics, Inc (United States)
19 August 2024 • 1:40 PM - 2:10 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 16A
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Low-temperature microplasmas, efficient sources of ions, electrons, and photons, particularly from microcavity plasma arrays, offer unprecedented performance in photonics. This paper reports recent advancements across three key areas: precise timekeeping, achieved through integrating microplasma mercury ion lamps into miniature clock systems with exceptional stability; uniform and high-fluence photon generation for VUV photolithography and nanopatterning, enabling selective surface modification and low temperature dielectric depositions at nano/micro scales; and deep UV (Far UV-C) excimer emission from microplasma lamps, utilized in preventing airborne as well as foodborne pathogen transmission. Far UV-C's safety for human exposure presents potential for indoor disinfection, including wearable devices, shaping biothreat prevention strategies.
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Author(s): Wim M. J. Coene, ASML Netherlands B.V. (Netherlands)
19 August 2024 • 2:10 PM - 2:40 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 16A
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With the aim of EUV imaging of nanostructures, a table-top EUV beamline has been constructed, for which the concept of lensless imaging, also known as ptychography, has been developed. The beamline is built around a high-harmonic generation (HHG) source. The coherent quasi-monochromatic EUV light is focused on the sample by an ellipsoidal mirror. Since our application is mainly directed towards wafer metrology for lithography, we adhere to a reflection set-up: the EUV light is scattered by the nanostructures at the surface of the sample, and is reflected towards a camera, where a far-field diffraction pattern is recorded. A data-set comprising a multitude of these diffraction patterns is generated for partially overlapping positions of the focused probe on the sample. Such a data-set provides the necessary redundancy for phase retrieval of the complex-valued field of the sample. Our ptychography algorithms have been developed within an automatic differentiation framework. The multiple challenges from concept and design towards experiment and application will be addressed.
13115-20
Author(s): Satoru Odate, Naooki Saito, Hajime Aoyama, Nikon Corp. (Japan); Koichi Kusuyama, RIKEN (Japan); Yasunobu Nakamura, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan), RIKEN (Japan); Hiroyuki Tsukamoto, Nikon Corp. (Japan)
19 August 2024 • 2:40 PM - 3:00 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 16A
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This research explores advances in the fabrication of Josephson junctions, crucial devices in superconducting quantum circuits. Our previous work has successfully fabricated these on a 12-inch substrate using an ArF immersion lithography. To enable future large-scale production, we are moving towards sputtering and dry etching techniques. After initial successful tests on a 4-inch substrate, we have now verified this process on 12-inch substrate fabrication equipment, marking significant progress despite the challenges we have faced.
Break
Coffee Break 3:00 PM - 3:30 PM
Session 7: UV and Deep UV Environmental Related Applications
19 August 2024 • 3:30 PM - 4:50 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 16A
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Author(s): Torsten Frosch, Technische Univ Darmstadt (Germany)
19 August 2024 • 3:30 PM - 4:00 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 16A
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Deep UV Raman spectroscopy is an extremely powerful technique for biosensing. Recently we advanced our photonic setup (laser techniques, optical hollow core fibers, etc.) for highly sensitive and selective monitoring of antibiotics in body fluids and the investigation of antimalarial active agents. We are also working of highly frequency resolved deep UV Raman spectroscopic techniques for the investigation of weak biomolecular interactions.
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Author(s): Hans D. Hallen, North Carolina State Univ. (United States)
19 August 2024 • 4:00 PM - 4:30 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 16A
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Complex materials inherently have complex spectroscopic signatures, limiting the use of Raman spectroscopy. We show resonance Raman for 3 complex systems to identify the presence of a moiety, and use its resonantly enhanced Raman spectra to identify molecular modifications. The large enhancement makes the Raman signal dominated by the resonant molecules. We show that heme still attached to globin remnants still exists in (complex) soft tissue extracted from B. canadensis and T. rex, but the heme outer ring has been damaged. Further, evidence of goethite on the heme still attached to the globin remnants suggests preservation modes. Modern analogs show similar trends. We separately show that methylated cytosine can be distinguished from un-methylated cytosine using resonance Raman with state-of-the-art sensitivity. Finally, phonon-allowed resonance excitation in PARes-Raman on benzene produces Raman signal gain of 3500x with an excitation wavelength change of 0.01 nm. This signal gain and narrow linewidth represents a further step to separately analyze chemical moieties in complex materials w/o sacrificing signal level but still providing Raman spectral vibration information.
13115-23
Author(s): Ilhem Elgargouri, Univ. de Technologie Troyes (France), Univ. de Tunis El Manar (Tunisia); Hind Kadiri, Komla D. Nomenyo, Akram Alhussein, Univ. de Technologie Troyes (France); Rached Ben Hassen, Univ. de Tunis El Manar (Tunisia); Gilles Lérondel, Univ. de Technologie Troyes (France)
19 August 2024 • 4:30 PM - 4:50 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 16A
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The depletion of natural resources today necessitates a reevaluation of technological development, considering both material abundance and energy-efficient processes while maintaining device efficiency. In this context, SrSnO3 emerges as a superior candidate, this material's abundance, non-toxicity, and cost-effectiveness, along with the tunable bandgap, the stability and durability underscore its potential in developing environmentally friendly and sustainable UV technologies. In this research, The synthesis of homogeneous, green, crack-free SrSnO3 thin films using sol-gel was achieved. XRD measurements confirmed the purity of the perovskite phase. The films presented 80% of transparency in the visible range with a UV absorption around 300nm. The efficiency of the material was further explored by layering the doped perovskite on Silcon to create a hybrid device and initial electrical properties will be discussed. This work contributes to the ongoing efforts to develop sustainable and efficient materials for UV optoelectronic devices and underscores the pivotal role of advanced material synthesis techniques in achieving this goal.
Featured Nobel Plenary
21 August 2024 • 5:00 PM - 5:45 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 6A
Session Chair: Jennifer Barton, The Univ. of Arizona (United States)

5:00 PM - 5:05 PM:
Welcome and Opening Remarks
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The route to attosecond pulses (Plenary Presentation)
Author(s): Anne L'Huillier, Lund Univ. (Sweden)
21 August 2024 • 5:05 PM - 5:45 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 6A
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When an intense laser interacts with a gas of atoms, high-order harmonics are generated. In the time domain, this radiation forms a train of extremely short light pulses, of the order of 100 attoseconds. Attosecond pulses allow the study of the dynamics of electrons in atoms and molecules, using pump-probe techniques. This presentation will highlight some of the key steps of the field of attosecond science.
Conference Chair
Univ. de Technologie Troyes (France)
Conference Chair
KAIST (Korea, Republic of)
Conference Chair
Hokkaido Univ. (Japan)
Conference Co-Chair
Osaka Univ. (Japan)
Program Committee
The Univ. of Utah (United States)
Program Committee
Xiamen Univ. (China)
Program Committee
Paul Scherrer Institut (Switzerland)
Program Committee
Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany)
Program Committee
Rice Univ. (United States)
Program Committee
North Carolina State Univ. (United States)
Program Committee
The Australian National Univ. (Australia)
Program Committee
Xiamen Univ. (China)
Program Committee
Kyoto Univ. (Japan)
Program Committee
Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)
Program Committee
The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)
Program Committee
Paul T. Matsudaira
National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore)
Program Committee
CEA Grenoble (France)
Program Committee
Univ. de Cantabria (Spain)
Program Committee
Kwansei Gakuin Univ. (Japan)
Program Committee
Univ. of Illinois (United States)
Program Committee
Univ. de Technologie de Troyes (France)
Program Committee
Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (Italy)
Program Committee
Institut de Sciences des Matériaux de Mulhouse (France)
Program Committee
The Univ. of Utah (United States)