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Helena Jelinkova

Professor, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University, Prague, Czech Republic
Country of birth: Czech Republic

Educational background: PhD Mathematics and Physics, MS Applied Physics, Czech Technical University of Prague

 

Helena Jelinkova

Who or what inspired you to work in science/engineering?
I designed and constructed my fi rst laser as part of my master's thesis. It was in 1969, and the lasers in this period were concentrated mainly in the research laboratory. As I took interest in laser research (covering quantum electronics, optics, laser design, laser radiation characterization, as well as laser applications), I decided to stay at the university to take a PhD course. Afterwards, I became a member of the team performing research and designing laser transmitters for precise geodetical measurements and laser applications in medicine.

Primary responsibilities of your current job
As a university professor I have several responsibilities: I am head of the laser laboratory performing research in solid state lasers - together with my assistants and students (bachelor, master and PhD). Also, I give lectures on laser technique and laser applications. In our research, we focus on several topics: first, testing new laser materials and new configurations of laser systems for generating new laser radiation wavelengths which can be used in the extending field of applications (in medicine, communication, spectroscopy, atmospheric measurements, etc.); second, using the new
generated wavelengths for medical applications to test the interaction of radiation with tissue (in vitro) and to design new laser instruments (in ophthalmology, dentistry, dermatology).

Biggest obstacle or challenge that you have faced in your career
My main challenge was to combine my family life and university research and lecturing. With the understanding and support of my family members, I have overcome the shortage of time.

Advice you wish you had received when you were first starting out
Try to choose the research fi eld you are interested in so your job will be entertainment for you.