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16 - 21 June 2024
Yokohama, Japan
Observation of the hot universe has a crucial impact on some of the most fundamental questions in astrophysics today. Hot plasmas, from the sun and stellar coronae to the cores of gamma ray bursts, expose the underpinning physics of observable phenomena: the evolution of largescale structure and nucleosynthesis; the interaction between galaxies and super-massive black holes; the behavior of matter under extreme conditions; the fate of the “missing” baryons; and the life cycle of stars. These topics require state-of-the art instruments on satellites in the UV to gamma-ray domain. In addition, many energetic phenomena including accretion and ejection processes near black holes and various types of transient phenomena exhibit high-energy radiation.

Previous and currently operating space telescopes, such as Chandra, XMM-Newton, FUSE, INTEGRAL, GALEX, RXTE, Hinode, SDO, Swift, Suzaku, FERMI ASTROSAT, HXMT, NICER and SRG, NuSTAR and, more recently, IXPE have revolutionized our view of the hot and energetic universe. By the time of the conference, we expect to see the return of a number of new exciting missions (XRISM, Einstein Probe and possibly SVOM). In addition, smaller scale initiatives exist and are either realized or in the implementation phase (including HERMES, Camelot, GRBAlpha, SpiRIT, COMPOL, COMCUBE, ULTRASAT. and many others). By the time of the meeting, it will be clear if STAR-X is selected as next MIDEX mission in NASA. Also, NASA has issued a call for probe-class missions in either the X-ray or Far-IR domain and different high-energy mission proposals are being prepared (STROBE-X, ARCUS-Probe, AXIS, HEX-P and LEM). At the end of the next decade the ESA large scale mission Athena will be the observatory of choice. These initiatives will be complemented by focused, small and mid-sized missions to allow for the full coverage of the UV to gamma-ray wavelength range. This may range from a new generation of X-ray timing instruments, imaging instruments, missions pushing the spectral resolution, hard X-ray telescopes, gamma-ray instruments, UV instruments or all sky monitors. In addition, it is crucial to explore and develop technology for missions in the next decade. Technology which will need to be advanced includes large format cryogenic imaging spectrometers, CMOS image arrays, pore optics, adjustable and active optics, multi-layers, X-ray polarimetry, X-ray interferometry, hard X-ray and gamma ray imaging systems.

This conference invites the community to contribute to the discussion of new observatories in the UV to gamma-ray band. The conference will cover, among others, the following issues: major questions in astrophysics that will drive the design of new observatories; lessons learned from existing observatories, both technical and astrophysical; approved and proposed new observatories; technologies in optics and focal planes; and novel concepts.

Papers are solicited on but not restricted to the following topics: ;
In progress – view active session
Conference 13093

Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2024: Ultraviolet to Gamma Ray

16 - 21 June 2024 | Room G414/415, North - 4F
View Session ∨
  • 1: Ultra Violet I
  • 2: Ultra Violet II
  • 3: Ultra Violet III
  • 4: Ultra Violet IV
  • Monday Plenary
  • 5: UV Technology I
  • 6: UV Technology II
  • 7: Athena Instruments I
  • 8: Athena Instruments II
  • Tuesday Plenary
  • 9: Optics I
  • 10: Optics II
  • 11: Operational Missions
  • Wednesday Plenary
  • 12: XRISM I
  • 13: XRISM II
  • 14: Detectors
  • Thursday Plenary
  • 15: Missions I
  • 16: Missions II
  • 17: Missions Probe Class Proposals
  • 18: Missions III
  • 19: Missions IV
  • 20: Gamma and Polarimetry I
  • 21: Gamma and Polarimetry II
  • Posters - UV
  • Posters - UV Technology
  • Posters - Athena Instruments
  • Posters - Optics
  • Posters - Detectors and Operations
  • Posters - XRISM
  • Posters - Missions
  • Posters - Gamma and Polarimetry
Session 1: Ultra Violet I
16 June 2024 • 08:30 - 09:50 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
Session Chair: Yoichi Yatsu, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan)
13093-1
Author(s): Haeun Chung, Carlos J. Vargas, Erika T. Hamden, Tom McMahon, Hannah Tanquary, Aafaque R. Khan, Fernando Coronado, Nicole Melso, Dave Hamara, Miriam Keppler, Jessica S. Li, Jason B. Corliss, Simran Agarwal, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Heejoo Choi, The Univ. of Arizona (United States), Large Binocular Telescope Observatory (United States); Elijah Garcia, Giulia Ghidoli, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Carl Hergenrother, John Kidd, Ascending Node Technologies, LLC (United States); Daewook Kim, Jamison Noenickx, Sooseong Park, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Sanford Selznick, Ascending Node Technologies, LLC (United States); Daniel Truong, Sumedha Uppnor, Bill Verts, Naomi Yescas, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Mateo Batkis, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Walter M. Harris, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); John J. Hennessy, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Keri Hoadley, The Univ. of Iowa (United States); Luis V. Rodriguez-de-Marcos, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States), The Catholic Univ. of America (United States); Adrian Martin, Sensor Sciences, LLC (United States); Manuel A. Quijada, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Oswald H. W. Siegmund, Sensor Sciences, LLC (United States)
16 June 2024 • 08:30 - 08:50 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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Aspera is a NASA-funded UV SmallSat Pioneers mission designed to detect and map warm-hot phase halo gas around nearby galaxies. The Aspera payload is designed to detect faint diffuse O VI emission at around 103.2 nm, satisfying the sensitivity requirement of 5E-19 erg/s/cm^2/arcsec^2 over 179 hours of exposure. In this presentation, we describe the overall payload design. The payload comprises two identical co-aligned UV long-slit spectrograph optical channels sharing a common UV-sensitive Micro Channel Plate detector. The design delivers spectral resolution R ~ 2,000 over the wavelength range of 101 to 106 nm. The field of view of each channel is 1 degree by 30 arcsec, with an effective area of 1.1 cm^2. The mission is now entering Phase D, payload integration, and testing, with the projected launch-ready date set for late-2025. The mission will be launched into low-Earth orbit via rideshare.
13093-2
Author(s): Drew M. Miles, Vincent Picouet, Chris Martin, Caltech (United States); Erika T. Hamden, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Keri Hoadley, The Univ. of Iowa (United States); Bruno Milliard, Lab. d'Astrophysique de Marseille (France); Shouleh Nikzad, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); David Schiminovich, Columbia Univ. (United States); David Valls-Gabaud, Observatoire de Paris (France); Simran Agarwal, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Philippe Balard, Patrick Blanchard, Lab. d'Astrophysique de Marseille (France); Harrison Bradley, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Nicolas Bray, Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales (France); Ignacio Cevallos-Aleman, Columbia Univ. (United States); Charles-Antoine Chevrier, Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales (France); Haeun Chung, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Marty Crabill, Caltech (United States); Fernando Cruz Aguirre, Greyson Davis, The Univ. of Iowa (United States); Xihan Deng, Caltech (United States); Fabien Harmand, Catherine Hourtolle, Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales (France); Olivia Jones, Nazende Kerkeser, Aafaque R. Khan, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Gillian Kyne, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Jessica S. Li, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Zeren Lin, Caltech (United States); Nicole Melso, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Johan Montel, Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales (France); Julie Richard, Lab. d'Astrophysique de Marseille (France); Meghna Sitaram, Columbia Univ. (United States); Jared A. Termini, The Univ. of Iowa (United States); Jean-Noel Valdivia, Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales (France); Didier Vibert, Lab. d'Astrophysique de Marseille (France); Matthew Werneken, Columbia Univ. (United States)
16 June 2024 • 08:50 - 09:10 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The Faint Intergalactic Medium Redshifted Emission Balloon (FIREBall-2) is a UV multi-object spectrograph designed to detect emission from the circumgalactic and circumquasar medium at low redshifts (0.3 < z < 1.0). The FIREBall-2 spectrograph uses a suborbital balloon vehicle to access a stratospheric transmission window centered around 205 nm and is fed by a 1-m primary parabolic mirror and a 2-mirror field corrector that allows an ≈11’ x 35’ field of view. The slit-mask spectrograph can access dozens of galaxy targets per field, with each target spectrum read out on a UV electron-multiplying CCD detector. Following a flight in 2018, several refurbishments and modifications were made to the instrument and telescope to prepare for additional flight opportunities. Here we present an overview of upgrades and improvements made since the previous flight and discuss the 2023 field campaign, which culminated in a flight from Fort Sumner, New Mexico in September, 2023.
13093-3
Author(s): April D. Jewell, Christophe Basset, Shouleh Nikzad, Gillian Kyne, Yuki Maruyama, Nathan Bush, John J. Hennessy, Todd J. Jones, Matthew Klein, Steve Monacos, Robin E. Rodríguez, David Ardila, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Judd Bowman, Johnathan Gamaunt, Arizona State Univ. (United States); Dawn Gregory, AZ Space Technologies, LLC (United States); Daniel Jacobs, Logan Jensen, Matthew Kolopanis, Cristy Ladwig, Tahina Ramiaramanantsoa, Arizona State Univ. (United States); Paul A. Scowen, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Nathaniel Struebel, AZ Space Technologies, LLC (United States); Evgenya Shkolnik, Arizona State Univ. (United States)
16 June 2024 • 09:10 - 09:30 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The Star-Planet Activity Research CubeSat (SPARCS) is 6U CubeSat whose mission will be to observe low-mass stars in two ultraviolet (UV) bands. SPARCS will provide time-dependent spectral slope, intensity, and evolution of stellar radiation with the goal of understanding the short and long term variability of these targets. Here we will summarize the performance of SPARCam, the science camera for SPARCS. SPARCam is a two-detector camera system allowing independent commanding of two delta-doped, UV CCD47-20 detectors, separately optimized for the SPARCS near-UV (NUV; 260–300 nm) and far-UV (FUV; 153–171 nm) bands. The presentation will include a description of the camera electronics as well as an in-depth characterization of the UV detectors. SPARCam was designed and built by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and delivered to Arizona State University in October 2023.
13093-4
Author(s): Michael W. Davis, G. R. Gladstone, Thomas K. Greathouse, Sue A. Ferrell, Philippa M. Molyneux, Steven C. Persyn, Kurt D. Retherford, Maarten H. Versteeg, Southwest Research Institute (United States)
16 June 2024 • 09:30 - 09:50 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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We present the results of the JUpiter ICy moons Explorer ultraviolet spectrograph (JUICE-UVS) near-earth commissioning. Near-earth commissioning activities included measurements of detector dark noise, optimizing detector HV level via observations of the interplanetary Lyman-alpha, and a “sky-spin” observation over the JUICE-UVS 7.5°-long slit while the spacecraft rolled about the high-gain antenna. Dark rates matched those measured on the ground. HV levels were nominal for the operational temperature. Observations with the high-spatial resolution aperture confirmed the sharpened focus when compared to nominal observations. The “sky-spin” observation passed through the galactic plane, observing many known UV-bright stars. These stars provide a rough estimate of instrument effective area that will be refined after JUICE passes >2 AU from the sun, enabling 3-axis stabilized pointed observations.
Break
Coffee Break 09:50 - 10:10
Session 2: Ultra Violet II
16 June 2024 • 10:10 - 11:50 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
Session Chair: Walter M. Harris, The Univ. of Arizona (United States)
13093-5
Author(s): Vladimír Dániel, Czech Aerospace Research Ctr. (Czech Republic); Norbert Werner, Masaryk Univ. (Czech Republic); Jan Václavík, Institute of Plasma Physics of the CAS, v.v.i. (Czech Republic); Jakub Jon, Petr Svoboda, Filip Rak, David Hriadel, Jan Gromeš, Czech Aerospace Research Ctr. (Czech Republic); Jakub Rípa, Filip Munz, Masaryk Univ. (Czech Republic); Martin Jelínek, Astronomical Institute of the CAS, v.v.i. (Czech Republic); Lukáš Steiger, Institute of Plasma Physics of the CAS, v.v.i. (Czech Republic); Jan Seginak, PEKASAT SE (Czech Republic); Róbert Šošovicka, Czech Aerospace Research Ctr. (Czech Republic)
16 June 2024 • 10:10 - 10:30 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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We present a spacecraft and payload system design of a UV space telescope on a ∼130kg micro-satellite mission with a moderately fast repointing capability and near real-time alert communication. The mission, called Quick Ultra-Violet Kilonova surveyor – QUVIK, shall measure the brightness evolution of kilonovae, resulting from mergers of neutron stars simultaneously in the near-UV and far-UV band and thus it shall distinguish between different explosion scenarios. As a secondary objective the mission will also provide unique follow-up capabilities for other transients both in the near- and far-UV bands. The mission was selected for implementation by an ambitious Czech national mission program to promote the development of Czech science and space technology.
13093-6
Author(s): Alex Haughton, Emily Witt, Alex Sico, Univ. of Colorado Boulder (United States); Sally Oey, Univ. of Michigan (United States); Michael J. Kaiser, Dana Chafetz, Jack Williams, James Green, Kevin C. France, Univ. of Colorado Boulder (United States); Takashi Sukegawa, Canon Inc. (Japan); Oswald H. W. Siegmund, Adrian Martin, Sensor Sciences, LLC (United States); Brian T. Fleming, Univ. of Colorado Boulder (United States)
16 June 2024 • 10:30 - 10:50 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The Integral Field Ultraviolet Spectrographic Experiment (INFUSE) sounding rocket is the first far-ultraviolet integral field spectrometer. The first launch of INFUSE occurred from White Sands Missile Range on October 29th, 2023, and demonstrated spectral multiplexing, successfully detecting ionized gas emission in the XA region of the Cygnus loop. The second launch of INFUSE is projected for spring 2025 to observe the star-forming galaxy NGC 2366 alongside companion NGC 2363. Several enhancements are planned for INFUSE before this second science flight, including adding an improved baffle to reduce contamination by second order light and treating several surfaces to reduce scattered geocoronal Lyman alpha. An additional grating will also be added to flight-qualify a new coating of Xenon enhanced Lithium Fluoride. We report on the flight results from the first launch as well as outline progress towards preparation for the second flight.
13093-7
Author(s): Jason B. Corliss, Walter M. Harris, Ricardo Maciel, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Derek Gardner, Radiance Technologies, Inc. (United States)
16 June 2024 • 10:50 - 11:10 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The Spatial Heterodyne Extreme Ultra-Violet Interferometer (SHEUVI) is an instrument developed through the NASA PICASSO program. We present experimental results from the SHEUVI instrument; provide a brief overview and the historical evolution of ARSHS; describe how precipitous results from the SHEUVI effort inspired the instrument design for the recently selected NASA - Astrophysics Research and Analysis (APRA) VUV rocket program; and, discuss how this project has also influenced current design work for future SmallSat/CubeSat mission opportunities.
13093-8
Author(s): Minori Fukuda, Asuka Ohira, Ryotaro Noto, Shunsuke Hayatsu, Hibiki Seki, Hironobu Takei, Katsuki Tashiro, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Takahiro Noguchi, Tokyo Denki Univ. (Japan); Hiroyuki Kobayashi, Kei Watanabe, Toshihiro Chujo, Yoichi Yatsu, Nobuyuki Kawai, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Tohru Nakano, I-NET Corp. (Japan); Mai Shirahata, Akito Enokuchi, Norihide Takeyama, Genesia Corp. (Japan); Naoki Ogino, Makoto Arimoto, Daisuke Yonetoku, Kanazawa Univ. (Japan); Hiromasa Tamura, Tokyo Drawing Co., Ltd. (Japan)
16 June 2024 • 11:10 - 11:30 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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PETREL (Platform for Extra & Terrestrial Remote Examination with LCTF) is a 50kg class satellite with a 80mm-diameter Ultraviolet Telescope (UVT). The science missions of the UVT system are the discovery of high-energy transients, such as supernovae and gravitational-wave electromagnetic sources. To achieve them, the optical system is optimized to detect near-UV photons between 250 and 300 nm. Within a 30-minutes exposure time per every revolution, it surveys a remarkably wide field as 50 deg^2 with a high sensitivity of 20~ AB magnitude. The Board Unit has an on-board computer, which directly analyzes raw images obtained by a back-illuminated CMOS sensor. The computer can detect transients immediately, so as to alert the transient information to ground within 30 minutes of discovery. We will achieve the first UV survey to explore the transients in their early phase and reveal the underlying physical processes.
13093-9
Author(s): Aafaque R. Khan, Erika T. Hamden, Haeun Chung, Steward Observatory (United States); Heejoo Choi, Daewook Kim, Wyant College of Optical Sciences (United States); Nicole Melso, Steward Observatory (United States); Keri Hoadley, The Univ. of Iowa (United States); Jason B. Corliss, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Carlos J. Vargas, Thomas J. McMahon, Hannah Tanquary, Steward Observatory (United States)
16 June 2024 • 11:30 - 11:50 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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Aspera is a NASA Astrophysics Pioneers SmallSat mission designed to study diffuse OVI emission from the warm-hot phase gas in the halos of nearby galaxies. Its payload consists of two identical Rowland Circle type long-slit spectrographs, sharing a single MicroChannel plate (MCP) detector. Each spectrograph channel, consisting of an off-axis parabola (OAP) primary mirror and a toroidal diffraction grating optimized for the 103-104 nm bandpass. Despite the simple configuration, the optical challenging alignment/integration process for Aspera is challenging due to tight optical tolerances, driven by the compact form factor, and the contamination sensitivity of the Far-Ultraviolet optics and detectors. In this paper, we discuss implementing a novel multi-phase approach to meet these requirements using state of the art optical metrology tools. For coarsely positioning the optics we use a blue-laser 3D scanner while the fine-alignment is done with Zygo interferometer and a custom computer generated hologram. The detector focus requires iterative in-vacuum alignment using Vacuum UV collimator. The alignment is done in a controller cleanroom facility at the University of Arizona.
Break
Lunch Break 11:50 - 13:10
Session 3: Ultra Violet III
16 June 2024 • 13:10 - 15:10 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
Session Chair: Sarah E. Tuttle, Univ. of Washington (United States)
13093-10
Author(s): Briana L. Indahl, Brian T. Fleming, Kevin C. France, David Wilson, Lab. for Atmospheric and Space Physics (United States); Juan M. Alcala, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte (Italy); Stefano Basso, Francesco Borsa, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy); Amal Chandran, Lab. for Atmospheric and Space Physics (United States); Marta M. Civitani, Vincenzo Cortroneo, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy); Néstor Espinoza, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States); Davide Fedele, INAF - Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri (Italy); Giancarlo Ghirlanda, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy); Fabien Grisé, The Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States); Eliza Kempton, Univ. of Maryland, College Park (United States); Tommi T. Koskinen, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Nicholas Kruczek, Lab. for Atmospheric and Space Physics (United States); Jake A. McCoy, Randall L. McEntaffer, The Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States); Yamila Miguel, Leiden Observatory (Netherlands); Nicholas J. Nell, Lab. for Atmospheric and Space Physics (United States); Brunella Nisini, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma (Italy); Giovanni Pareschi, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy); Ignazio F. Pillitteri, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma (Italy); Peter C. Schneider, Hamburger Sternwarte, Univ. Hamburg (Germany); Davide Sisana, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy); Stefan Ulrich, Dmitry Vorobiev, Lab. for Atmospheric and Space Physics (United States); Allison Youngblood, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
16 June 2024 • 13:10 - 13:30 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The MANTIS (Monitoring Activity of Nearby sTars with uv Imaging and Spectroscopy) 16U CubeSat mission, led by the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) at the University of Colorado Boulder, plans to characterize the high-energy stellar radiation that drives atmospheric photochemistry and escape on extrasolar planets by conducting simultaneous observations of exoplanet host stars at extreme-ultraviolet (100–1200A; EUV), far-ultraviolet (1300–2200A; FUV), near-ultraviolet (2200–3500A; NUV), and visible (3500–10000A; VIS) wavelengths. The science payload's two-telescope design enables simultaneous coverage over the entire UV passband and the first EUV astrophysics capability in over 20 years. An 8.5cm diameter grazing incidence telescope feeds a low-resolution EUV spectrograph while a 14x9cm rectangular Cassegrain telescope feeds a dichroic beamsplitter to divide the light into both an NUV/VIS and FUV channel. The MANTIS design, detector systems, spacecraft bus and mission operations build off of the heritage of the CUTE and SPRITE CubeSats developed by the MANTIS team. This proceeding overviews the design of the MANTIS instrument and general mission concept.
13093-11
Author(s): Erika T. Hamden, Steward Observatory (United States); David Schiminovich, Columbia Univ. (United States); Haeun Chung, Steward Observatory (United States); Keri Hoadley, The Univ. of Iowa (United States); Neal Turner, Shouleh Nikzad, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Blakesley Burkhart, Rutgers, The State Univ. of New Jersey (United States); Shmuel Bialy, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology (Israel); Shuo Kong, Miriam Keppler, Serena Kim, Steward Observatory (United States); Tom Haworth, Queen Mary Univ. of London (United Kingdom); Min-Young Lee, Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (Korea, Republic of); Thavisha Dharmawardena, Flatiron Institute (United States)
16 June 2024 • 13:30 - 13:50 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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Eos is a mission concept to be proposed to the expected 2025 NASA Small Explorers Announcement of Opportunity. Eos observes molecular clouds in our galaxy to understand the link between star and planet formation and molecular hydrogen in galactic star forming regions. Eos does this using very long-slit, moderate resolution spectroscopy of UV emission from fluorescent molecular hydrogen, a powerful and underutilized FUV diagnostic. H2 is the most abundant molecule in the universe, but is typically observed in the IR or observed via proxies such as CO. Eos will directly observe H2 via fluorescence, which can be stimulated from a range of sources (shocks, external energy fields, bright stars, etc). Here we briefly describe the science objectives of Eos, as well as the instrument implementation.
13093-12
Author(s): Keri Hoadley, The Univ. of Iowa (United States); Allison Youngblood, Sarah Peacock, Eliad Peretz, Bert Pasquale, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Scott Bounds, Jeff Dolan, Richard Dvorsky, Casey T. DeRoo, The Univ. of Iowa (United States); Graham Kerr, The Catholic Univ. of America (United States); Tommi T. Koskinen, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Arika Egan, Johns Hopkins Univ. Applied Physics Lab., LLC (United States); Kevin C. France, Univ. of Colorado Boulder (United States)
16 June 2024 • 13:50 - 14:10 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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What is the amount of ionizing energy incident on exoplanet atmospheres from their host stars? What is the relationship between white-light flares and this ionizing energy? These are key questions required to link our current archive of hundreds of stellar whitelight flares to the ionizing radiation released during them, and the ramifications of those flares on the survival of exoplanetary atmospheres, particularly for planets orbiting within the habitable zones of low-mass stars. The Small NASA Optical Ultraviolet Telescope (SNOUT) is a proposed Pioneers mission comprised of two co-pointing telescopes: one optimized for EUV wavelengths (comprised of three separate EUV segments) and one for visible wavelengths. SNOUT is designed to measure the quiescent extreme-UV (EUV) emission for 30 mow-mass stars (0.3 - 1 solar masses), covering a range of ages, in three EUV bandpasses. The combined instrument is housed in an ESPA-Grande spacecraft and will launch into low Earth orbit for a one-year baseline mission. SNOUT has a substantial educational and early-career mentoring component; early-career scientists and engineers comprise more than half of the team, including key leadership roles.
13093-13
Author(s): Paul A. Scowen, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Richard Ignace, East Tennessee State Univ. (United States); Ken Gayley, The Univ. of Iowa (United States)
16 June 2024 • 14:10 - 14:30 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The Polstar SMEX mission has been designed to study the impact of rotation and environment on the evolution of massive stars. These stars are the most important contributors to galactic cosmic evolution, as they live out their entire lives and go supernova while low-mass stars are still forming. Massive stars drive the ecology of star formation through the Baryonic Cycle. A host of theories predict profound, yet different, consequences on stellar evolution for rapid rotation in these stars, so observational constraints are now essential. Polstar will use UV spectropolarimetry to capitalize on tell-tale stellar and wind asphericities induced by rapid rotation, to constrain the internal physics that dictates the evolution of the star and its impact on the Galaxy. Polstar will deliver 0.01% UV spectropolarimetry to provide a new window, a new capability to view the Universe with.
13093-14
Author(s): Fiona A. Harrison, Brian W. Grefenstette, Caltech (United States); William Craig, Space Science Lab. (United States), Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States); Danielle Berg, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States); Walter R. Cook, Hannah P. Earnshaw, Jason R. Fucik, Karl Forster, Caltech (United States); Suvi Gezari, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States); Matthew Graham, Caltech (United States); John J. Hennessy, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Mansi Kasliwal, Caltech (United States); Joel Krajewski, Space Sciences Lab. (United States), Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States); Shrinivas R. Kulkarni, Caltech (United States); Rafaella Marqutti, Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States); Chris Martin, Caltech (United States); Shouleh Nikzad, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Sterl Phinney, Caltech (United States); Hugues Sana, KU Leuven (Belgium); Roger Smith, Caltech (United States); Keivan G. Stassun, Vanderbilt Univ. (United States); Daniel Stern, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Harry Teplitz, IPAC (United States); Dan Weisz, Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)
16 June 2024 • 14:30 - 14:50 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The Ultraviolet Explorer (UVEX) mission is built on three scientific pillars: (I) Exploring the low-mass, low-metallicity galaxy frontier; (II) Providing new views of the dynamic universe, and (III) Leaving a broad legacy of modern, deep synoptic surveys. The deep, synoptic all-sky survey includes the Galactic Plane and Magellanic Clouds and achieves depths and resolution matching modern optical/IR surveys with Rubin, Roman, and Euclid. UVEX will follow up the aftermath of GW-detected NS mergers and provide the first rapid UV spectroscopic follow-up of transients. The UVEX payload consists of a single instrument with simultaneous FUV and NUV imaging over a wide (12 deg2) FOV and sensitive R>1000 spectroscopy over a broad band from 1150 – 2650 Å. Placed in a highly elliptical, TESS-like orbit, UVEX achieves low background and high observing efficiency. Frequent ground contacts and rapid slew capability enable UVEX to promptly follow up targets of opportunity, providing the first rapid, deep UV imaging and spectroscopic follow-up capability.
13093-15
Author(s): Yoichi Yatsu, Minori Fukuda, Shunsuke Hayatsu, Nobuyuki Kawai, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Shrinivas R. Kulkarni, Caltech (United States); Nozomu Tominaga, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (Japan); Masaomi Tanaka, Tohoku Univ. (Japan); Tomoki Morokuma, Chiba Institute of Technology (Japan); Nao Suzuki, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (United States); Hiroyuki Kobayashi, Daiki Kobayashi, Moe Yasuda, Keito Otsubo, Yusuke Arai, Katsuki Tashiro, Yusaku Ozeki, Kiyona Miyamoto, Kei Watanabe, Toshihiro Chujo, Hiroki Nakanishi, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Yuji Sakamoto, Hokkaido Univ. (Japan); Hiroaki Kobayashi, Yu Murata, Toru Nakano, Masashi Uo, Eriko Kusunoki, Chiharu Iizuka, I-NET Corp. (Japan); Norihide Takeyama, Akito Enokuchi, Mai Shirahata, Genesia Corp. (Japan); Leo Terada, Toshiki Ozawa, I-NET Corp. (Japan)
16 June 2024 • 14:50 - 15:10 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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PETREL's science goal is to detect transient phenomena in ultraviolet objects and to reveal the nature of explosive phenomena in the universe through multi-messenger observations. PETREL is equipped with an 8cm refractor telescope and a COTS BI-CMOS detector behind an optical blind filter. Expected sensitivity is 20 mag(AB) for a 50 deg^2 field of view at a wavelength of 250-300 nm with a 30 minute exposure. To perform multi-messenger observations, the high-performance OBC automatically analyzes the acquired images and searches for transient sources on board. The coordinates and magnitudes of transients are transmitted to the ground within minutes via a commercial real-time communication network. The overall system of the PETREL satellite, with a particular focus on ultraviolet astronomy missions, will be presented.
Break
Coffee Break 15:10 - 15:40
Session 4: Ultra Violet IV
16 June 2024 • 15:40 - 17:20 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
Session Chair: Shouleh Nikzad, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
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Author(s): Sarah E. Tuttle, Jessica Werk, Univ. of Washington (United States); John J. Hennessy, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Brian T. Fleming, Lab. for Atmospheric and Space Physics (United States); Oswald H. W. Siegmund, Space Sciences Lab. (United States); Manuel A. Quijada, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Thomas R. Quinn, Matthew McQuinn, Alvar Saenz-Otero, Univ. of Washington (United States); Shouleh Nikzad, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Mehran Mesbahi, Univ. of Washington (United States); Lauren Corlies, Adler Planetarium & Astronomy Museum (United States); Yakov Faerman, Univ. of Washington (United States); Natalie Sanchez, Carnegie Observatories (United States); Travis Mandeville, Univ. of Washington (United States)
16 June 2024 • 15:40 - 16:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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We present the experimental design of Maratus, a proposed 6U cubesat designed to map the circumgalactic medium of nearby galaxies. We leverage recent work in absorption line measurements of the gas near galaxies, improved far ultraviolet optical component performance, and the flexibility of the cubesat platform to create a pathfinding experiment at relatively low cost. We outline the key motivations behind such a mission, present the technical approach and feasibility measures, and conclude by highlighting the role Maratus can play in supporting upcoming larger scale missions, such as the Habitable Worlds Observatory.
13093-17
Author(s): Keri Hoadley, The Univ. of Iowa (United States); Curtis McCully, Las Cumbres Observatory (United States)
16 June 2024 • 16:00 - 16:20 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are a cornerstone of modern cosmology. Upcoming missions like the Nancy Grace Roman Telescope are pushing to high redshifts to measure cosmological parameters like the dark energy equation of state. Despite the impressive success of empirically standardizing their luminosities, the explosion mechanism of SNe Ia remains hotly debated; e.g., the mass of the white dwarf (WD) when it explodes and the state of the companion star (degenerate or non-degenerate) are all currently in question. Early-time UV observations are sensitive to the outermost layers of the ejecta (and least affected by the explosion itself) and show the most diversity for SNe Ia. This makes the UV bandpass an excellent probe to solve these open questions about the nature of these cosmological distance indicators. To achieve this science, we present UVIa, a CubeSat that will be reactive and have simultaneous optical, Near-UV (NUV), and Far-UV (FUV) coverage, takes advantage of state-of-the-art UV coatings, UV-enhanced silicon detectors with whitelight rejection filter, and autonomous observing scheduling, updated regularly based on newly discovered SNe Ia from modern transient surveys.
13093-18
Author(s): Fuminori Tsuchiya, Tohoku Univ. (Japan); Go Murakami, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Expolration Agency (Japan); Atsushi Yamazaki, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Shingo Kameda, Akifumi Nakayama, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan); Masahiro Ikoma, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (Japan); Tomoki Kimura, Tokyo Univ. of Science (Japan); Chihiro Tao, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (Japan); Ryoichi Koga, Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Jun Kimura, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Kei Masunaga, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Shotaro Sakai, Tohoku Univ. (Japan); Masami Ouchi, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (Japan), The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Masaomi Tanaka, Tohoku Univ. (Japan); Shin Toriumi, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Kazuo Yoshioka, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Masato Kagitani, Tohoku Univ. (Japan)
16 June 2024 • 16:20 - 16:40 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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LAPYUTA (Life-environmentology, Astronomy, and PlanetarY Ultraviolet Telescope Assembly) is a future UV space telescope, which is selected as a candidate for JAXA's 6th M-class mission in 2023. Launch is planned for the early 2030s. LAPYUTA has the following four objectives. Objective 1 focuses on the subsurface ocean environment of Jupiter's icy moons and the atmospheric evolution of terrestrial planets. Objective 2 is to characterize the atmospheres and estimate the surface environment of exoplanets around the habitable zone by detecting their exospheric atmospheres. In cosmology and astronomy, Objective 3 will test whether the structures of present-day galaxies contain ubiquitous Lyα halos and reveal the physical origins of Lyα halos. Objective 4 elucidates the synthesis process of heavy elements from observations of ultraviolet radiation from hot gas immediately after neutron star mergers.
13093-19
Author(s): Isu Ravi, Jack Ford, Russell Pelton, Stephan McCandliss, Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States)
16 June 2024 • 16:40 - 17:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The Johns Hopkins Rocket Group is developing a hydrogen absorption cell to mitigate the Lyman-alpha emission challenge posed by the geocorona for astronomical observations in the Lyman ultraviolet (LUV) spectrum (100-120 nm) from low-Earth orbit. This prototype, a low-pressure (~3 torr) stainless steel chamber with two lithium fluoride (LiF) windows, enables transmission down to about 103 nm. It thermally dissociates molecular hydrogen into atomic form using a heated tungsten filament, absorbing Lyman-alpha radiation and preventing resonant scattering. Our preliminary results with the Long-slit Imaging Dual Order Spectrograph (LIDOS) reveal variations in Lyman-alpha absorption with different filament types and indicate potential molecular hydrogen fluorescence and electron impact excitation. These findings are vital for advancing hydrogen absorption cell technology in future LUV missions.
13093-20
Author(s): Walter M. Harris, Jason B. Corliss, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Edwin Mierkiewicz, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical Univ. (United States); Dolon Bhattacharyya, Univ. of Colorado Boulder (United States); Gonzalo Augusto Cucho-Padín, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
16 June 2024 • 17:00 - 17:20 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The Hydrogen Emission Line Interferometric eXplorer (HELIX) is a SmallSat mission concept to study the vertical distribution and transport flux of geocoronal hydrogen that is transitioning from Earth’s upper atmosphere into the exosphere. This investigation is conducted using a dual channel, all-reflective Spatial Heterodyne Spectrometer (SHS). A SHS is a type of Fourier Transform Spectrometer that divides incoming light into 2-beams with a diffraction grating that interfere to produce a linear fringe pattern from which spectral power is obtained. The HELIX SHS has a dual ruled grating that is can be simultaneously aligned to observe the Ly-alpha and Ly-beta transitions of hydrogen. It has a spectral resolving power of ~200000 that separates the geocoronal lines from contaminating background emissions and allows exploration of the thermal and non-thermal populations of hydrogen. HELIX is designed for incorporation into a high-heritage SmallSat spacecraft platform that would be launched into low Earth orbit for a 12 month mission. This presentation describes the SHS concept, the mission requirements for HELIX, and the expected on-orbit performance of the instrument.
Monday Plenary
17 June 2024 • 08:30 - 10:00 Japan Standard Time | National Convention Hall, 1F

View Full Details: spie.org/AS/monday-plenary

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Author(s): Tomonori Usuda, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (United States); Yuko Kakazu, Thirty Meter Telescope (United States)
17 June 2024 • 08:30 - 09:15 Japan Standard Time | National Convention Hall, 1F
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The Thirty Meter Telescope International Observatory (TIO) is an ambitious international scientific endeavor. In Part 1, we highlight Japan’s contributions toward technical advancements. Building upon the scientific and engineering success of the Subaru Telescope and ALMA, Japan leads in developing the telescope structure, primary mirror production, and cutting-edge science instruments. Part 2 delves into TIO’s transformative shift toward community engagement. At TIO, we believe in community model of astronomy that upholds the values of inclusion, respect, and community stewardship. We are committed to listening to, learning from, and working together with Hawaiʻi commuities to build a brighter future for all.
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Author(s): Charles Mpho Takalana, The African Astronomical Society (South Africa)
17 June 2024 • 09:15 - 10:00 Japan Standard Time | National Convention Hall, 1F
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Africa's unique dark skies offer vast potential for astronomy, which has significantly advanced over the last two decades through substantial investment in infrastructure and human capital. The African Astronomical Society (AfAS), relaunched in 2019, plays a crucial role in this ascent, enhancing the network of astronomers across the continent, fostering research collaborations, and advising on policy. Noteworthy achievements for Astronomy in Africa include securing a bid to host the mid-frequency component of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) telescope, hosting the first International Astronomical Union (IAU) General Assembly in Africa in August 2024, and being home to the IAU Office of Astronomy for Development (OAD) since 2011. This talk highlights these milestones, illustrating the community's commitment to developing astronomy on the continent and utilising astronomy as a tool to address developmental challenges.
Break
Coffee Break 10:00 - 10:20
Session 5: UV Technology I
17 June 2024 • 10:20 - 12:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
Session Chair: Gillian Kyne, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
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Author(s): Sona Hosseini, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States), Caltech (United States); Leonard Strachan, U.S. Naval Research Lab. (United States); Angelos Vourlidas, Larry Paxton, Johns Hopkins Univ. Applied Physics Lab., LLC (United States)
17 June 2024 • 10:20 - 10:40 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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Here we report the progress of the Compact Lyman-alpha Spatial heterodyne Spectrometer (CLASS), a novel, ultra-compact, EUV spectrometer that exceeds the capabilities of any previous ultraviolet (UV) coronagraph spectrometers with significantly less mass (~ 1 kg), size (~ show box), and compact telescope aperture (< 30 cm). Current sensors to study these questions are large instruments with considerable demands on spacecraft resources (mass, power, volume). CLASS is based on the reflective cyclical design Spatial Heterodyne Spectrometry (SHS) technique and obtains high spectral resolution profiles of Hydrogen Lyman-alpha emission at 1216Å from the solar atmosphere. High energy Solar Energetic Particles, when produced in large fluxes, can cause severe damage to satellite components and pose a radiation health risk to humans in space. However, these events' exact origin, timing, and intensity are poorly understood. Acknowledgments: This work has been conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA: copyright 2024, California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.
13093-22
Author(s): Emily Farr, Nicholas Kruczek, Kevin C. France, Nicholas J. Nell, Patrick Behr, Stefan Ulrich, Univ. of Colorado Boulder (United States); Juan Larruquet, Carlos Honrado-Benítez, Paloma López-Reyes, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (Spain), Instituto de Óptica "Daza de Valdés" (Spain); John J. Hennessy, Robin E. Rodríguez, NASA (United States), Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
17 June 2024 • 10:40 - 11:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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In pursuit of maturing high priority UV optics technology for the Habitable Worlds Observatory, we present laboratory reflectivity results and ongoing environmental stability testing of band-selecting filters designed for the Lyman-ultraviolet bandpass (LUV; 90-120 nm) and the far-ultraviolet bandpass (FUV; 120-150 nm), and reflectance uniformity of broadband (90 – 2500nm) coatings. These band-selecting coatings were developed in coordination with the Grupo de Óptica de Laminas Delgadas (GOLD) for the Far- and Lyman-Ultraviolet Imaging Demonstrator (FLUID) sounding rocket payload. Environmental stability tests of Lyman alpha (Ly-α; 121.6 nm) suppressing filters peaked near 105 nm (F110M) and 140 nm (F140M) were conducted in testing facilities at CU Boulder. Additionally, we present initial results of UV coating development in collaboration with NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. These coatings were created using ALD at JPL, to advance the throughput efficiency of MgF2 protective capping layers for UV optics. The MgF2 coatings vary in deposition thickness and temperature. We also present initial results on the reflectance uniformity of large (≥ 6’’) Al/MgF2 ALD coated optics.
13093-26
Author(s): Aafaque R. Khan, Erika T. Hamden, Steward Observatory (United States); Gillian Kyne, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Frank Gacon, John Ford, Dave Beaty, Paul Arbo, Jessica S. Li, Ipek Kerkeser, Jacob Vider, Steward Observatory (United States)
17 June 2024 • 11:00 - 11:20 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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Understanding the noise characteristics of high quantum efficiency silicon-based Ultraviolet detectors, developed by the Micro Devices Lab at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, is critical for current and proposed UV missions using these devices. In this paper, we provide an overview of our detector noise characterization test bench that uses delta-doped, photon counting, Electron-multiplying CCDs (EMCCDs) to understand the fundamental noise properties relevant to all Silicon CCDs and CMOS arrays. This work attempts to identify the source of the dark current plateau that has been previously measured with photon-counting EMCCDs and is known to be prevalent in other silicon-based arrays. It is suspected that the plateau could be due to a combination of detectable photons in the tail of blackbody radiation of the ambient instrument, low-level light leaks, and a non-temperature-dependent component that varies with substrate voltage. Our innovative test setup delineates the effect of the ambient environment during dark measurements by independently controlling the temperature of the detector and surrounding environment. We present the design the test setup and preliminary results.
13093-24
Author(s): Brian T. Fleming, Dmitry Vorobiev, Briana L. Indahl, Lab. for Atmospheric and Space Physics (United States); Amanda Hendrix, Planetary Science Institute (United States); Rebecca Schindhelm, Ball Aerospace (United States)
17 June 2024 • 11:20 - 11:40 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The study of solar system bodies in the ultraviolet is often the study of extended sources, including vapor plumes, atmospheres, cometary tails, and planetary surfaces. These objects are traditionally studied with long-slit spectrographs that can sample only one dimension of spatial information at a time. The Ultraviolet Micromirror Imaging Spectrograph (UMIS) is a new instrument concept that will provide adaptive ultraviolet integral-field spectroscopy for the first time. UMIS employs a reconfigurable micromirror array at the focal plane to dissect portions of a 3 x 3 degree field-of-view into arbitrarily shaped apertures, each of which is then sampled spectroscopically on sub-arcminute scales and sub-nanometer resolution. The micromirror array enables this performance over a far larger field-of-regard than static image slicers, enabling efficient mapping of dynamic extended objects in the ultraviolet for the first time. UMIS is under fabrication at the University of Colorado, Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics for potential future deployment on planetary science missions. This proceedings presents the UMIS optical design and development schedule.
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Author(s): Sebastian J. Diebold, Jürgen Barnstedt, Jonas Bluhm, Lauro Conti, Institut für Astronomie & Astrophysik, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany); Hans R. Elsener, EMPA (Switzerland); Markus Höltzli, Christoph Kalkuhl, Laurin Rupp, Institut für Astronomie & Astrophysik, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany); Daniel Schaadt, Darleen Rau, Institute of Energy Research and Physical Technologies, Technische Univ. Clausthal (Germany); Thomas Schanz, Beate Stelzer, Alexander Stock, Christopher Weinert, Klaus Werner, Institut für Astronomie & Astrophysik, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany)
17 June 2024 • 11:40 - 12:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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In the near future, after the shutdown of the Hubble Space Telescope, observational access to the ultraviolet (UV) will be quite limited. Therefore, small missions with short development times are required to bridge the gap in this important wavelength domain. Despite the progress in adapting silicon sensors for the UV, single-photon-counting and visible-blind microchannel plate (MCP) detectors can still provide a superior signal-to-noise performance, particularly in the far-UV, and enable simple instrument designs for small and cheap missions. Our MCP detector development aims at reaching enhanced sensitivity and increased lifetime with lower size, mass, and power consumption. Therefore, the design comprises (Al)GaN photocathodes with a tunable long-wavelength cut-off, long-life borosilicate MCPs, and a cross-strip anode with an FPGA-based readout. In this contribution, we report on the overall status of the detector development, present the latest characterization results, and give an outlook on the mission prospects.
Break
Lunch Break 12:00 - 13:20
Session 6: UV Technology II
17 June 2024 • 13:20 - 14:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
Session Chair: Jeff T. Booth, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
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Author(s): Aaron Tohuvavohu, Mark Barnet, Shaojie Chen, Dunlap Institute for Astronomy & Astrophysics (Canada), Univ. of Toronto (Canada); Christopher Damaren, Maria Drout, Univ. of Toronto (Canada); Julia Empey, Univ. of Waterloo (Canada); Jean-Christophe Fronteddu, Braden Gail, Univ. of Toronto (Canada); Ajay Gill, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); Gavin Hay, Sarik Jeram, Dunlap Institute for Astronomy & Astrophysics (Canada), Univ. of Toronto (Canada); Christopher Matzner, Univ. of Toronto (Canada); Patrick Nkwari, Dhwanil Patel, Dunlap Institute for Astronomy & Astrophysics (Canada), Univ. of Toronto (Canada); Emma Seabrook, Univ. of Toronto (Canada); Mohamed Shaaban, Suresh Sivanandam, Jacob Taylor, Dunlap Institute for Astronomy & Astrophysics (Canada), Univ. of Toronto (Canada); Phil Van-Lane, Univ. of Toronto (Canada)
17 June 2024 • 13:20 - 13:40 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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Astronomy-grade cameras with robust performance and heritage in the space environment have long been costly, substantially limiting capacity for space-based astronomy and creating a resource barrier to access. Additionally, ultraviolet observations have historically been limited by the low-sensitivity of most sensors in this wavelength range. The LUVCam program is designed to address both issues, providing a high-performance, low-cost, UV/optical camera system sufficiently capable to support a wide-array of space-based astronomy missions. LUVCam features a large format, low-noise, large pixel, and high quantum efficiency, commercial-off-the-shelf backside illuminated CMOS sensor, packaged with custom built readout electronics and thermomechanical structure. LUVCam is ITAR-free, and cheap to fabricate, opening up new opportunities for access to space telescopes. LUVCam has reached TRL 6, and has passed qualification testing for operation in low-earth orbit, with competitive performance from 200-900 nm. LUVCam is manifested for multiple near-term orbital missions, including a technology demonstration CubeSat, and a UV transient astronomy SmallSat.
13093-27
Author(s): Kevin C. France, Univ. of Colorado Boulder (United States); Jason Tumlinson, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States); Brian T. Fleming, Univ. of Colorado Boulder (United States); Erika T. Hamden, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Stephan McCandliss, Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States); Paul A. Scowen, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Sarah E. Tuttle, Univ. of Washington (United States); Allison Youngblood, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
17 June 2024 • 13:40 - 14:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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Many of the key technologies in the development queue for the Habitable Worlds Observatory (HWO) require the combined activities of 1) facility and process development for validation of technologies at the scale required for HWO and 2) deployment in the ‘real world’ environment of mission Integration & Test followed by on-orbit operations. We present a concept for the Smallsat Technology Accelerated Maturation Platform (STAMP), a parallel and closely-linked facility, laboratory, and instrument prototype development program that can be applied to any of NASA’s Future Great Observatories. We present the recommendation for the first entrant into this program, “STAMP-1”, a smallsat mission advancing key technologies that would enable the ultraviolet capabilities of HWO. Advanced broadband optical coatings, high-sensitivity ultraviolet detector systems, and multi-object selection technology would all be brought to TRL 6 and flight demonstrated through this program. STAMP-1 advances HWO technology on an accelerated timescale, reducing cost and schedule risk, and conducting a compelling program of preparatory science and workforce development for HWO.
Session 7: Athena Instruments I
17 June 2024 • 14:00 - 15:30 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
Session Chair: Marshall W. Bautz, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
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Author(s): Kirpal Nandra, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
17 June 2024 • 14:00 - 14:30 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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Following the recent reformulation of the Athena mission to meet budgetary and technical constraints, both the scientific case and the instrument design of the Wide Field Imager instrument have been reviewed to reflect the requirements and constraints of the new Athena concept. In this paper, a summary of the updated science case for WFI will be presented, along with an update of the instrument design, the status of critical technologies and future plans for model development.
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Author(s): Valentin Emberger, Johannes Müller-Seidlitz, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Wolfgang Treberer-Treberspurg, Parviz Azhdarzadeh, Abbas Rezaei, Univ. of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Günter Hauser, Robert Andritschke, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
17 June 2024 • 14:30 - 14:45 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The Wide Field Imager (WFI), one of two instruments on ESA's next large X-ray mission Athena, is designed for imaging spectroscopy of X-rays in the range of 0.2 -15 keV. The focal plane consists of back-illuminated DEPFET sensors with high radiation tolerance. The main mechanism of degradation will be the increase of dark current due to displacement damage caused primarily by high energy protons. We investigate the effect of 62.4 MeV protons on the detector when irradiated at the operating temperature of 213 K. A total dose equivalent to 3.4 ∙ 109 10-MeV protons/cm2 was applied. Annealing effects at different temperatures were examined.
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Author(s): Johannes Müller-Seidlitz, Robert Andritschke, Valentin Emberger, Günter Hauser, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Peter Lechner, Halbleiterlabor der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft (Germany); Astrid Mayr, Jonas Reiffers, Anna-Katharina Schweingruber, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
17 June 2024 • 14:45 - 15:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The Wide Field Imager of Athena is composed of two back side illuminated detector units using DEPFET sensors operated in rolling shutter readout mode. A large detector array featuring four sensors with 512 × 512 pixels each and a small detector that facilitates the high count rate capability of the WFI for the investigation of bright, point-like sources. First sensors from the flight production are now available. We present the spectral capability measured at different photon energies and asses the expected performance after years of operation in space using Monte Carlo simulations to combine all information gained by measurements.
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Author(s): Philippe Peille, Vincent Albouys, Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales (France); Didier Barret, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie (France); Jan-Willem A. den Herder, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Luigi Piro, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Massimo Cappi, INAF - Osservatorio di Astrofisica e Scienza dello Spazio (Italy)
17 June 2024 • 15:00 - 15:30 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The Athena mission underwent a redefinition phase since July 2022, driven by the imperative to reduce the mission cost for the European Space Agency while maintaining its flagship character. This most notably lead to a modification of the X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU) cryogenic architecture. Passive cooling via radiative panels at spacecraft level (V-grooves) now provides a 50K thermal environment to the X-IFU cryostat. 4K cooling is achieved through a remote active cooler, with a multi-stage Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator delivering the final 50 mK temperature required by the detectors. Amidst these changes, the core concept of the readout chain remains robust, utilizing Transition Edge Sensor microcalorimeters and Time-Division Multiplexing. Noteworthy is the introduction of a slower pixel, enabling an increase in the multiplexing factor (from 34 to 48) without compromising the energy resolution. This mitigates the reduction of the field of view (from 5’ to 4’) while reducing the number of channels and thus the resource demands on the system. In this contribution, we will give an overview of this new instrument architecture, addressing its main functional chains.
Break
Coffee Break 15:30 - 16:00
Session 8: Athena Instruments II
17 June 2024 • 16:00 - 17:30 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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Author(s): Hervé Geoffray, Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales (France)
17 June 2024 • 16:00 - 16:15 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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This paper presents the progress done on early demonstrations (warm electronics, cryo-harness breadboarding,...), while providing an update to the detection-chain design description of the Athena X-IFU instrument.
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Author(s): Matteo D'Andrea, Claudio Macculi, Simone Lotti, Luigi Piro, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Andrea Argan, INAF (Italy); Guido Torrioli, Fabio Chiarello, CNR-Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie (Italy)
17 June 2024 • 16:15 - 16:30 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The X-IFU is one of the two instrument of ATHENA, the next ESA X-ray observatory. It is a cryogenic spectrometer based on a large array of TES microcalorimeters. To reduce the particle background, the TES array works in combination with a Cryogenic AntiCoincidence detector (CryoAC). The CryoAC is a 4-pixels detector, based on ~1 cm2 silicon absorbers sensed by Ir/Au TES. It is required to have wide energy bandwidth (from 20 keV to ~1 MeV), high efficiency (< 0.014% of missed particles), low dead-time (< 1%) and good time-tagging accuracy (10 μs at 1σ). We have developed an end-to-end simulator of the CryoAC detector, composed of several modules. First, the in-flight flux of background particles is assessed by Geant4 simulations. Then, the current flow in the TES is evaluated by solving the electro-thermal equations of microcalorimeters, and the detector output signal is generated by simulating the SQUID FLL dynamics. Finally, the output is analyzed by a high-efficiency trigger algorithm, producing the simulated CryoAC telemetry. Here, we present in detail this end-to-end simulator, and how we used it to define the new baseline CryoAC configuration in the newAthena context.
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Author(s): Henk J. van Weers, Johannes P. C. Dercksen, Mark Leeman, Paul van der Hulst, A. J. van der Linden, Arthur Q. Bennebroek, Roland H. den Hartog, Pourya Khosropanah, Brian D. Jackson, Peter Roelfsema, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands)
17 June 2024 • 16:30 - 16:45 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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This paper describes the redesign performed on the X ray Integral Field Unit Focal Plane Assembly (X-IFU FPA) Development Model (DM) in preparation of the instrument PDR and MAR, with a focus on the mechanical modifications of the T0 detector stage. A new, flight sized detector is used, as well as flight scalable interconnections to route the TDM signals to the MUX chip and subsequent cold electronics. In addition the development of several critical technologies within the DM1.1 are described. These include fixation of the main TES array to the metal support, a dedicated wire bonding process of the main TES array to the side panel MUX carrier chips and interconnection of the super-conducting Nb flex cables to the connecting Printed Circuit Boards (PCB).
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Author(s): Emanuele Taralli, Roland H. den Hartog, Geert Keizer, Johannes Dercksen, Brian D. Jackson, Henk J. van Weers, Jan-Willem A. den Herder, Pourya Khosropanah, Peter Roelfsema, Damian Audley, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands)
17 June 2024 • 16:45 - 17:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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This paper describes the micro-vibrational characterization of the Development Model (DM) of the X ray Integral Field Unit Focal Plane Assembly (X-IFU FPA) for the Athena X-ray observatory. We discuss the power dissipation occurring when FPA modes are excited. We compare amplitude and phase measured by X-Z accelerometers, thermometers response and the pixels DC baseline signal due to acceleration provided by actuator towards the FPA center of mass. Impact of the micro-vibrations on the thermal stability at the detectors level and the possible degradation on the pixels performance will be discussed in detail.
13093-36
Author(s): Alexeï Molin, François Pajot, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie (France); Marc Audard, Univ. de Genève (Switzerland); Marco Barbera, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo "Giuseppe Salvatore Vaiana" (Italy); Sophie Beaumont, Edoardo Cuchetti, Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales (France); Matteo D'Andrea, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Christophe Daniel, Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales (France); Roland H. den Hartog, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Megan E. Eckart, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States); Philippe Ferrando, CEA-IRFU (France); Elias Kammoun, Univ. degli Studi di Roma Tre (Italy); Maurice A. Leutenegger, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Simone Lotti, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Jean-Michel Mesnager, Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales (France); Lorenzo Natalucci, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Philippe Peille, Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales (France); Jelle de Plaa, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Etienne Pointecouteau, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie (France); Frederick S. Porter, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Kosuke Sato, Saitama Univ. (Japan); Joern Wilms, Dr. Karl Remeis-Sternwarte Astronomisches Institut (Germany), Erlangen Ctr. for Astroparticle Physics (Germany); Luciano Gottardi, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Vincent Albouys, Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales (France); Didier Barret, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie (France); Massimo Cappi, INAF - Osservatorio di Astrofisica e Scienza dello Spazio (Italy); Jan-Willem A. den Herder, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Luigi Piro, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy)
17 June 2024 • 17:00 - 17:15 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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This paper describes the strategy and planned implementation of the ground calibration of the X-IFU microcalorimeter spectrometer on-board Athena, the X-ray observatory from ESA to be launched after the mid-2030s. X-IFU is the second generation of space microcalorimeter instrument, and its calibration strategy benefits from the experience acquired on the present Japanese-US built Resolve instrument on-board XRISM. This calibration plan takes into account the reformulation of the Athena mission and its instruments that took place in 2022-23. The X-IFU calibration strategy is presented along with the set of X-ray sources needed for the ground calibration and the the definition of the sequences for using them.
13093-165
Author(s): Stephen J. Smith, Joseph S. Adams, Simon R. Bandler, James A. Chervenak, Renata S. Cumbee, Fred M. Finkbeiner, Joshua D. Fuhrman, Samuel V. Hull, Richard L. Kelley, Caroline A. Kilbourne, Frederick S. Porter, Kazuhiro Sakai, Nicholas A. Wakeham, Edward J. Wassell, Sang H. Yoon, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
17 June 2024 • 17:15 - 17:30 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The X-ray integral field unit (X-IFU) will be a microcalorimeter instrument on ESA’s Athena observatory. The X-IFU array will consist of ~ 1.5k transition edge sensors (TESs) on a 317-micron pitch, optimized for the energy range of 0.2-12 keV. The instrument provides a spectral resolution of 3 eV at energies of up to 7 keV and is read out using time division multiplexing (TDM). We report on the status and plan for continued maturation of the X-IFU array. This includes efforts to optimize the pixels for reduced magnetic field sensitivity and reduced dynamic range usage (needed to optimally couple them to the readout with lowest possible noise). We describe the design and characterization of the first full scale microcalorimeter arrays that have flight-like electrical and mechanical interfaces. These arrays are being developed for a focal-plane assembly demonstration model in Europe and are a precursor to the X-IFU engineering model.
Tuesday Plenary
18 June 2024 • 08:30 - 10:00 Japan Standard Time | National Convention Hall, 1F

View Full Details: spie.org/AS/tuesday-plenary

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Author(s): Saku Tsuneta, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (Japan)
18 June 2024 • 08:30 - 09:15 Japan Standard Time | National Convention Hall, 1F
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The Basic Plan on Space Policy sets forth the basic principles of Japan's space policy with an aim to promote policies for space development. The latest version, approved by the Cabinet in June 2023, marks a significant shift by defining space science as a crucial integral part of Japan's space development efforts, transitioning from treating it solely as an isolated academic activity. For instance, the Artemis program is promoted as a policy initiative where scientific exploration is positioned to serve a precursor role. It also encourages Japan’s involvement in NASA's post-JWST efforts. Here, I will present Japan's recent accomplishments and future plans in space science.
13173-503
Author(s): Mark Clampin, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); John M. O'Meara, W. M. Keck Observatory (United States)
18 June 2024 • 09:15 - 10:00 Japan Standard Time | National Convention Hall, 1F
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The goals of the Astrophysics Division are to understand how the universe works, understand how we got here and to address the question, are we alone? In this talk, Dr. Clampin will discuss the current goals of the Astrophysics Division, and its suite of current and future missions. He will also preview progress towards the 2020 National Academies (NAS) Decadal Survey including the key recommendation, the Habitable Worlds Observatory and NASA’s approach to its implementation. Dr. O’Meara will discuss the first steps towards implementation, the formation of a Science, Technology, Architecture Review Team (START) and Technical Analysis Group (TAG) for HWO. He will describe how these teams, along with a large cohort of volunteers are working to define the trade space that must be explored for HWO to meet its top science goals of surveying exoplanets for the signatures of life and performing transformational astrophysics.
Break
Coffee Break 10:00 - 10:20
Session 9: Optics I
18 June 2024 • 10:20 - 12:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
Session Chair: Marcos Bavdaz, European Space Agency (Netherlands)
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Author(s): Randall L. McEntaffer, The Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States)
18 June 2024 • 10:20 - 10:40 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The Off-plane Grating Rocket Experiment (OGRE) is a NASA suborbital rocket mission for high-performance X-ray spectroscopy. The nominal payload utilizes lightweight, polished-Si optics fabricated by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, a reflection grating array fabricated at Penn State with key industrial collaborations, and an EM-CCD based camera fabricated by XCAM in collaboration with the Open University. In preparation for the nominal mission, we will fly a pathfinder rocket that swaps the polished-Si telescope out for the JET-X telescope. This is one of three telescopes originally made for Spectrum-x-gamma with one currently flying on Swift and one slated for Pathfinder-OGRE, being lent by the Italian Space Agency. Here we report on the progress of the OGRE program, overview of the Pathfinder-OGRE mission, and updates on the nominal payload.
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Author(s): Casey T. DeRoo, The Univ. of Iowa (United States); Fabien Grisé, Randall L. McEntaffer, James H. Tutt, The Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States); Cecilia R. Fasano, The Univ. of Iowa (United States)
18 June 2024 • 10:40 - 11:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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Improved X-ray/UV spectroscopy is needed for studies of exoplanet host systems, the evolution of galaxies, and the physics of extreme astrophysical conditions. Efficient, high-resolution X-ray / UV spectrometers would meet this need, but realizing such instruments, particularly in compact formats like SmallSats, are often gated by the fabrication of a grating that meets the size, shape, diffractive design, and performance requirements of the spectrometer. We report on an effort to make custom, high performance gratings on curved surfaces using electron-beam lithography (EBL). We have made modestly-sized gratings (39 mm X 20 mm) on cylindrical surfaces with sag comparable to that of a grazing-incidence optic (> 1 mm). Our approach uses interferometric measurements of diffracted orders to assess the fidelity of EBL in realizing the desired grating, providing a direct measurement of the technology’s current capabilities and informing development efforts. We also report on the fabrication and testing of a diffractive silicon mirror operating at grazing incidence, as well as an optical design for a test of a novel, two-element spectrometer system.
13093-39
Author(s): Ralf K. Heilmann, MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research (United States); Alexander R. Bruccoleri, Izentis LLC (United States); Mark L. Schattenburg, MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research (United States)
18 June 2024 • 11:00 - 11:20 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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Critical-angle transmission (CAT) gratings are an enabling technology for the Arcus-Probe mission, which addresses high-priority science goals from Astro2020. We previously reported x-ray results from quasi-fully illuminated, co-aligned CAT gratings showing record-high resolving power R = lambda/Delta lambda up to 1.3x10^4 in 18th and 21st orders at Al-K, and diffraction efficiency of blazed orders in agreement with pencil beam synchrotron measurements and model predictions at O-K. We will give updates on enhanced diffraction efficiency for CAT gratings that were chemically thinned after fabrication.
13093-40
Author(s): William W. Zhang, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
18 June 2024 • 11:20 - 11:40 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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We report on the status of an X-ray optics development effort at Goddard Space Flight Center. The development effort is designed to enable future flagship missions like Lynx in the long term and to support Probe missions and Explorer missions like AXIS, HEX-P, LEM, and STAR-X, in the near term. It takes into consideration the three major work areas of building an X-ray mirror assembly, i.e., technology, engineering, and production, while focusing its resources on developing and maturing a technology based single crystal silicon. Boiled down to the most essentials, the development tackles four major technical areas: fabrication, coating, alignment, and bonding of thin, lightweight mirror segments. The technology is based on single crystal silicon, whose lack of internal stress makes it possible to use many polishing techniques to make the best possible thin, lightweight mirror segments. We will report results achieved with repeated building and testing mirror modules, as well as knowledge and lessons learned in each of the four technical areas.
13093-41
Author(s): Hironori Matsumoto, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Kairyu Tsuchiya, Tokyo Denki Univ. (Japan); Mio Aoyagi, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Hisamitsu Awaki, Ehime Univ. (Japan); Takuya Hosobata, RIKEN (Japan); Haruki Kuramoto, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Shinya Morita, Tokyo Denki Univ. (Japan); Kaito Murakami, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Masahiro Takeda, Yutaka Yamagata, RIKEN (Japan)
18 June 2024 • 11:40 - 12:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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Light-weight X-ray mirrors with a high-angular resolution and a large effective area are required to clarify the physical mechanism of the coevolution of galaxies and black holes. To realize such X-ray mirrors, we are developing X-ray mirrors using the carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP); CFRP is a light, but strong material, and it can be processed into a variety of shapes. However, CFRP has a finely textured surface, which is called print through. The surface is too rough to reflect X-rays due to the print though. In order to mitigate the print through, we developed a method to form a thin amorphous NiP layer on the surface of CFRP. Then the NiP surface was finished by ultra-precision machining technology to achieve sufficient surface roughness to reflect X-rays. An X-ray reflectivity measurement for a prototype CFRP-NiP flat mirror using the ISAS X-ray beam line confirmed that the surface roughness was sufficient to reflect X-rays of a few keV. We are also developing the prototype of the Wolter-I type mirror, which is reported in this talk.
Break
Lunch/Exhibition Break 12:00 - 13:20
Session 10: Optics II
18 June 2024 • 13:20 - 15:20 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
Session Chair: William W. Zhang, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
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Author(s): Marta M. Civitani, Stefano Basso, Mauro Ghigo, Giovanni Pareschi, Daniele Spiga, Gabriele Vecchi, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy); Mauro Fiorini, Salvatore Incorvaia, Giorgio Toso, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica cosmica Milano (Italy); Luigi Lessio, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova (Italy); Giancarlo Parodi, BCV Progetti S.r.l. (Italy)
18 June 2024 • 13:20 - 13:40 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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Italy, through ASI funding and INAF-OAB leadership, is actively pursuing a technology development roadmap for the realisation of thin glass monolithic shell. This paper outlines the progress made in advancing various phases of the process and in procuring new substrates.
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Author(s): Danielle N. Gurgew, Nicholas E. Thomas, Srikanth Panini Singam, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
18 June 2024 • 13:40 - 14:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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Alongside the development of high resolution, full-shell replicated X-ray optics, MSFC is also pursuing the development of advanced thin film coatings. Current direct deposition methods for full shell coatings involve a radio frequency (RF) sputtering system with a wire-like target that slowly deposits a single layer of metal on the inner surface of the shell. As coating designs become more complex, a new method of direct deposition is required. Due to the promising results of on-going hard X-ray multilayer development at Marshall, recent funding has been granted to procure a new DC magnetron deposition system to directly deposit multilayer coatings onto the reflective surface of full shell optics. This new system will vastly expand MSFC’s coating capabilities for full shell optics to include bilayer and multilayer coated designs. The design of this new system and its applications for hard X-ray mission concepts such as SuperHERO and HEX-P, with be presented and discussed.
13093-44
Author(s): Marcos Bavdaz, Eric Wille, Mark Ayre, Ivo Ferreira, Sebastiaan Fransen, European Space Agency (Netherlands); Maximilien J. Collon, Giuseppe Vacanti, Nicolas M. Barrière, Boris Landgraf, David Girou, cosine measurement systems (Netherlands); Mark Olde Riekerink, Jeroen Haneveld, Ronald Start, Bart Schurink, Micronit B.V. (Netherlands); Desirée Della Monica Ferreira, Sonny Massahi, Sara Svendsen, Finn E. Christensen, DTU Space (Denmark); Michael Krumrey, Dieter Skroblin, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (Germany); Vadim Burwitz, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Giovanni Pareschi, Bianca Salmaso, Alberto Moretti, Daniele Spiga, Stefano Basso, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy); Giuseppe Valsecchi, Dervis Vernani, Media Lario S.r.l. (Italy); Paul Lupton, Teledyne e2v UK Ltd. (United Kingdom); Mirko Riede, Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoff- und Strahltechnik IWS (Germany); Tapio Korhonen, Mikko Pasanen, Opteon Oy (Finland); Alejandro Sanchez, Dominique Heinis, Carles Colldelram Peroliu, ALBA Synchrotron (Spain); Massimiliano Tordi, EIE S.r.l. (Italy); Norman Niewrzella, Carl Zeiss SMT GmbH (Germany)
18 June 2024 • 14:00 - 14:20 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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With the endorsement of the NewAthena (New Advanced Telescope for High ENergy Astrophysics) mission by ESA’s Science Programme Committee in November 2023, the preparations for this next generation X-ray observatory have shifted to a higher gear. Competitive system studies and technology preparation activities are being implemented, aiming to demonstrate readiness for the mission adoption early 2027 and the subsequent mission implementation. The Silicon Pore Optics (SPO) enables the NewAthena mission, delivering an unprecedented combination of good angular resolution, large effective area and low mass. The SPO technology builds significantly on spin-in from the semiconductor industry and is designed to allow a cost-effective flight optics implementation, compliant with the programmatic requirements of the mission. This paper will provide an overview of the activities preparing the implementation of the NewATHENA optics.
13093-45
Author(s): Maximilien J. Collon, Luis Abalo, Nicolas M. Barrière, Alex Bayerle, Donny de Borst, Luigi Castiglione, Loes Crama, Abdelhakim Chatbi, Noë Eenkhoorn, David Girou, Ramses Günther, James Harpur, Enrico Hauser, Jasper den Hollander, Yvette Jenkins, Boris Landgraf, Adam Lassise, Laurens Keek, Christian Körnig, Sebastian Obwaller, Ben Okma, Paulo da Silva Ribeiro, Chris Rizos, Aniket Thete, Giuseppe Vacanti, Sjoerd Verhoeckx, Mark Vervest, Roel Visser, Luc Voruz, cosine measurement systems (Netherlands); Marcos Bavdaz, Ivo Ferreira, Eric Wille, European Space Agency (Netherlands); Mathijs Bosman, Jeroen Haneveld, Arenda Koelewijn, Jan-Joost Lankwarden, Mark Olde Riekerink, Bart Schurink, Ronald Start, Maurice Wijnperlé, Micronit B.V. (Netherlands); Levent Cibik, Michael Krumrey, Dieter Skroblin, Vadim Burwitz, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (Germany); Finn E. Christensen, Desirée Della Monica Ferreira, Sonny Massahi, Diego P. Sanz, Sara Svendsen, DTU Space (Denmark); Ethan Dunnell, Paul Lupton, Chris Adam, Andrew Rees, Teledyne e2v UK Ltd. (United Kingdom); Carles Colldelram Peroliu, Dominique Heinis, Alejandro Sánchez, ALBA Synchrotron (Spain); Norman Niewrzella, Carl Zeiss SMT GmbH (Germany); Stefano Basso, INAF (Netherlands); Alberto Moretti, Bianca Salmaso, Daniele Spiga, INAF (Italy)
18 June 2024 • 14:20 - 14:40 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The European Space Agency (ESA), cosine and its partners have been developing for more than 15 years the Silicon Pore Optics (SPO) technology. SPO enables the next generation of space x-ray telescopes, with increased sensitivity and resolution. NewAthena, the New Advanced Telescope for High Energy Astrophysics, has just been endorsed by ESA as one of its L-class mission, to launch in 2037. NewAthena’s optic is modular and consists of up to 600 mirror modules that form together a ~2.5 m diameter x-ray mirror with a focal length of 12 m and an angular resolution of 9 arc-seconds half-energy width. The total geometric polished mirror surface is ~300 m2, which will focus x-rays with an energy of about 0.3 – 10 keV onto two detectors, a wild-field imager (WFI) and an imaging spectrometer (XIFU). Building hundreds of such SPO mirror modules in a cost-efficient and timely manner is a formidable task and subject of a dedicated ESA technology development program. We present in this paper the status of the optics production, and illustrate not only recent X-ray results but also the progress made on the environmental testing, manufacturing and assembly aspects of SPO based optics.
13093-46
Author(s): Desiree D. M. Ferreira, Sara Svendsen, Sonny Massahi, Nis Christian Gellert, Diego P. Sanz, Arne Jegers, DTU Space (Denmark); Boris Landgraf, Maximilien J. Collon, cosine measurement systems (Netherlands); Ivo Ferreira, Marcos Bavdaz, European Space Research and Technology Ctr. (Netherlands); Finn E. Christensen, DTU Space (Denmark)
18 June 2024 • 14:40 - 15:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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High-energy astrophysics missions demand cutting-edge technologies to assure their maximum observational capabilities. This study explores multilayer coatings for X-ray mirrors, specifically assessing their potential applications for the NewAthena mission and other possible future high-energy missions. Our work emphasizes the design parameters crucial for enhancing mirror performance and investigates the experimental challenges related to the fabrication and performance evaluation of multilayer coatings. We present various concept designs for both soft and hard X-ray focusing telescopes, incorporating simple single-layer and bilayer coatings, with a particular focus on linear and depth-graded multilayer coatings. Leveraging state-of-the-art understanding and modeling of relevant effects influencing telescope performance enables a realistic extension of coating designs to higher energies. The implications of our findings not only endorse the use of multilayer coatings for the NewAthena mission but also offer insights into the broader landscape of future high-energy astrophysics missions.
13093-47
Author(s): Vadim Burwitz, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Maximilien J. Collon, Giuseppe Vacanti, Nicolas M. Barrière, Boris Landgraf, cosine measurement systems (Netherlands); Marcos Bavdaz, European Space Agency (Netherlands), European Space Research and Technology Ctr. (Netherlands); Ivo Ferreira, European Space Agency (Netherlands); Gisela Hartner, Andreas Langmeier, Thomas Müller, Surangkhana Rukdee, Thomas Schmidt, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
18 June 2024 • 15:00 - 15:20 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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Regularly, future mission X-ray optics are tested and calibrated at the PANTER X-ray test facility of the Max-Planck-Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics. The ATHENA mission has just completed a science and hardware redefinition phase as the NewATHENA mission. During this one-and-a-half-year redefinition phase, the development of the baseline Silicon Pore Optics SPOs continued, resulting in the fabrication of the first SPO mirror modules with all the NewATHENA characteristics (dimensions, rib spacing, and coating). At PANTER, these NewATHENA SPOs will be measured and characterized. This characterization comprises the on- and off-axis point spread function half energy widths. Furthermore, effective area measurements covering the energy range of NewATHENA will be performed. This presentation will provide an overview of the results obtained from recent campaigns.
Break
Coffee Break 15:20 - 15:50
Session 11: Operational Missions
18 June 2024 • 15:50 - 17:30 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
Session Chair: Hironori Matsumoto, Osaka Univ. (Japan)
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Author(s): Weimin Yuan, National Astronomical Observatories (China)
18 June 2024 • 15:50 - 16:30 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The Einstein Probe (EP) is a space mission dedicated to X-ray time-domain astrophysics, with a broad range of scientific goals. It will carry two instruments, one wide-field X-ray telescope (WXT) to monitor the soft X-ray sky in 0.5-4keV with a 3600 square-degree field-of-view, and one narrow-field X-ray telescope (FXT) for deep follow-up observations in 0.3-10keV and precise source locating. The Einstein Probe is a mission of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in collaboration with ESA, MPE and CNES. This talk will introduce the mission and its current status.
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Author(s): Benjamin Nobre Hauptmann, Selina Howalt Owe, Denis Tcherniak, Irfan Kuvvetli, Carl Budtz-Jørgensen, Technical Univ. of Denmark (Denmark); Ian Baistow, Kromek (United Kingdom); Brian Harris, Kromek (United States); Alexander Cherlin, Ben Cantwell, Kromek (United Kingdom)
18 June 2024 • 16:30 - 16:50 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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What do medical imaging and astronomy have in common? Whether it is detecting tumors or observing colliding neutron stars, both fields can benefit from the same sensor technology. When observing radiation in the MeV-band (0.1-100 MeV) from celestial sources, one faces challenges like low flux, limited interaction probability, three energy loss processes, and a high background radiation rate. Present MeV-band observatories suffer from poor sensitivity, and new state-of the-art detector technology will be a key contributor to improve sensitivity of future observatories. The detector group at DTU Space has developed a 3D CZT drift strip detector technology to meet the demands of future high-energy detectors. This advancement might also prove advantageous for emerging Low Dose Molecular Breast Imaging (LD-MBI) systems for breast cancer diagnosis. In this study, we present the results of the novel large area 3D CZT drift strip detectors (4x4x0.5cm3) developed through collaboration between DTU Space and Kromek.
13093-50
Author(s): Catherine E. Grant, Marshall W. Bautz, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); Paul P. Plucinsky, Ctr. for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian (United States); Peter G. Ford, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
18 June 2024 • 16:50 - 17:10 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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As the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) on the Chandra X-ray Observatory completes a quarter century of on orbit operations, it continues to perform well and produce spectacular scientific results. The response of ACIS has evolved over the lifetime of the observatory due to radiation damage, molecular contamination, changing particle environment, and aging of the spacecraft in general. We present highlights from the instrument team's monitoring program and our expectations for the future of ACIS. Performance changes on ACIS continue to be manageable, and do not indicate any limitations on ACIS lifetime. We examine aspects of the design and operation of ACIS that have impacted its long lifetime with lessons learned for future instruments.
13093-51
Author(s): Andrew Inglis, Albert Shih, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
18 June 2024 • 17:10 - 17:30 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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RHESSI was a solar X-ray mission that observed the Sun at X-ray and gamma-ray wavelengths for 16 years, with an energy range covering 3 keV - 17 MeV. RHESSI instrumentation consisted of nine cryocooled, segmented, germanium detectors. We report on the performance of these detectors over the course of 16 years of science operations in a mid-latitude, low-Earth orbit environment. We assess the evolution of the energy gain and energy calibration for each detector, the segmentation status of the detectors over time, and the effectiveness of detector annealing in restoring performance. We highlight some of the challenges associated with determining the calibration over such a long on-orbit time period. These results provide valuable context for future X-ray and gamma-ray space missions.
Wednesday Plenary
19 June 2024 • 08:30 - 10:00 Japan Standard Time | National Convention Hall, 1F

View Full Details: spie.org/AS/wednesday-plenary

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Author(s): René J. Laureijs, European Space Research and Technology Ctr. (Netherlands)
19 June 2024 • 08:30 - 09:15 Japan Standard Time | National Convention Hall, 1F
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After launch on 1 July 2023, the Euclid space telescope of the European Space Agency (ESA) has begun its 6-year mission designed to understand the origin of the Universe's accelerating expansion, which is commonly associated with Dark Energy. By observing billions of galaxies, Euclid will create a 3-dimensional map of the Universe covering 10 billion years of cosmic history. It contains the hierarchical assembly of (dark) matter in galaxies, clusters and superclusters telling us about the nature of gravity and giving us a detailed measurement of the accelerated expansion of the Universe in time. The stringent image quality and sky survey requirements impose extreme performances of the telescope, instruments, and spacecraft. After a mission summary, I will describe the in-orbit spacecraft and instrument performances. A notable challenge is the processing of the large volume of data. The scientific prospects of Euclid are illustrated with the first images and early science results.
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Author(s): Fiona A. Harrison, Caltech (United States)
19 June 2024 • 09:15 - 10:00 Japan Standard Time | National Convention Hall, 1F
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The Ultraviolet Explorer (UVEX) mission, scheduled for launch in 2030, advances three scientific pillars: exploring the low-mass, low-metallicity galaxy frontier; providing new views of the dynamic universe, and leaving a broad legacy of modern, deep synoptic surveys adding to the panchromatic richness of 21st century astrophysics. The UVEX instrument consists of a single module with simultaneous FUV and NUV imaging over a wide (10 sq. deg) FOV and sensitive R>1000 spectroscopy over a broad band from 1150 - 2650 Angstroms. In this talk I will describe the UVEX scientific program and provide an overview of the instrument and mission.
Break
Coffee Break 10:00 - 10:20
Session 12: XRISM I
19 June 2024 • 10:20 - 12:15 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
Session Chair: Kazuhiro Nakazawa, Nagoya Univ. (Japan)
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Author(s): Makoto S. Tashiro, Saitama Univ. (Japan); Hironori Maejima, Kenichi Toda, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Kyoko Matsushita, Tokyo Univ. of Science (Japan); Hiroya Yamaguchi, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Richard L. Kelley, Lillian S. Reichenthal, Leslie S. Hartz, Robert Petre, Brian J. Williams, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Matteo Guainazzi, European Space Agency (Netherlands), European Space Research and Technology Ctr. (Netherlands); Elisa Costantini, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands)
19 June 2024 • 10:20 - 10:50 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The X-Ray Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission (XRISM) project was initiated in 2018. Following the development of onboard components, the proto-flight was conducted from 2021 to 2023 at JAXA Tsukuba Space Center. The spacecraft was launched from JAXA Tanegashima Space Center on September 7, 2023, and onboard components, including the observation instruments, were activated during the three months of the in-orbit commissioning phase. Following the previous report in 2020, we report the spacecraft ground tests, the launch operation, in-orbit operations, and the status and plan of initial and following guest observations.
13093-53
Author(s): Yoshitomo Maeda, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan); Hisamitsu Awaki, Ehime Univ. (Japan); Jesus C. Balleza, Kim R. Barnstable, Thomas G. Bialas, Rozenn Boissay-Malaquin, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Gregory V. Brown, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States); Edgar R. Canavan, Timothy M. Carnahan, Meng P. Chiao, Brian J. Comber, Renata S. Cumbee, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Elisa Costantini, Jan-Willem A. den Herder, Johannes Dercksen, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Michael J. DiPirro, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Megan E. Eckart, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States); Yuichiro Ezoe, Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan); Carlo Ferrigno, Univ. de Genève (Switzerland); Ryuichi Fujimoto, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Nathalie Q. S. Gorter, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Steven M. Graham, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Martin Grim, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Leslie S. Hartz, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Ryota Hayakawa, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, KEK (Japan); Takayuki Hayashi, Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States); Natalie Hell, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States); Akio Hoshino, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Yuto Ichinohe, RIKEN Nishina Ctr. for Accelerator-Based Science (Japan); Daiki Ishi, Manabu Ishida, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Kumi Ishikawa, Yoshitaka Ishisaki, Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan); Bryan L. James, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Yoshiaki Kanemaru, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Steven J. Kenyon, Richard L. Kelley, Caroline A. Kilbourne, Mark O. Kimball, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Shunji Kitamoto, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan); Maurice A. Leutenegger, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Dan McCammon, Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison (Japan); Brian J. McLaughlin, Joseph J. Miko, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Erik van der Meer, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Misaki Mizumoto, Univ. of Teacher Education Fukuoka (Japan); Takashi Okajima, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Atsushi Okamoto, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Stéphane Paltani, Univ. de Genève (Switzerland); Frederick S. Porter, Lillian S. Reichenthal, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Kosuke Sato, Saitama Univ. (Japan); Toshiki Sato, Meiji Univ. (Japan); Yohichi Sato, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Makoto Sawada, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan); Keisuke Shinozaki, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Russell F. Shipman, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Peter J. Shirron, Gary A. Sneiderman, Soong Yang, Richard Szymkiewicz, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Andrew E. Szymkowiak, Yale Univ. (United States); Yoh Takei, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Mai Takeo, Saitama Univ. (Japan); Tsubasa Tamba, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Keisuke Tamura, Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States); Masahiro Tsujimoto, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Yuusuke Uchida, Tokyo Univ. of Science (Japan); Stephen Wasserzug, Michael C. Witthoeft, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Rob Wolfs, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Shinya Yamada, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan); Susumu Yasuda, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan)
19 June 2024 • 10:50 - 11:20 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The initial on-orbit checkout of the soft X-ray spectroscopic system (Resolve) on board the XRISM satellite is summarized. XRISM was launched on September 6, 2023 (UT) and has been undergoing initial checkout since then. Immediately after launch, cooling of the vessel covering the sensor (Dewar) was advanced, and the first cycle of adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) was performed on Day 32 to transition the sensor to steady-state operational temperature conditions. Subsequently, the filter wheel which supports energy calibration, was started up. The energy scale is highly sensitive on the temperature environment around the sensor. The gain correction by referring to the calibration X-ray lines together with the temperature of the sensor. For an optimization of the cooler frequency, we took the noise spectra by scanning the coolers frequencies, which were made with three steps and were taken over six consequent days at the last step. In addition, the gate valve (GV), which protects the inside of the Dewar from outside air pressure at launch, will be opened to bring the system to a state where it is ready for regular operations.
13093-54
Author(s): Koji Mori, Univ. of Miyazaki (Japan); Hiroshi Tomida, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Hiroshi Nakajima, Kanto Gakuin Univ. (Japan); Takashi Okajima, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Hirofumi Noda, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Hiroyuki Uchida, Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Hiromasa Suzuki, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Shogo B. Kobayashi, Tokyo Univ. of Science (Japan); Tomokage Yoneyama, Chuo Univ. (Japan); Kouichi Hagino, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Kumiko K. Nobukawa, Kindai Univ. (Japan); Takaaki Tanaka, Konan Univ. (Japan); Hiroshi Murakami, Tohoku Gakuin Univ. (Japan); Hideki Uchiyama, Shizuoka Univ. (Japan); Masayoshi Nobukawa, Nara Univ. of Education (Japan); Hironori Matsumoto, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Takeshi Go Tsuru, Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Makoto Yamauchi, Isamu Hatsukade, Univ. of Miyazaki (Japan); Hirokazu Odaka, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Takayoshi Kohmura, Tokyo Univ. of Science (Japan); Kazutaka Yamaoka, Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Manabu Ishida, Yoshitomo Maeda, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Takayuki Hayashi, Keisuke Tamura, Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States); Rozenn Boissay-Malaquin, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Toshiki Sato, Meiji Univ. (Japan); Tessei Yoshida, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Yoshiaki Kanemaru, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Junko S. Hiraga, Kwansei Gakuin Univ. (Japan); Tadayasu Dotani, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Masanobu Ozaki, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (Japan); Hiroshi Tsunemi, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Shun Inoue, Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Ryuichi Azuma, Konan Univ. (Japan); Yoh Asahina, Shutaro Nakamura, Takamitsu Kamei, Masahiro Fukuda, Kanto Gakuin Univ. (Japan); Kazunori Asakura, Marina Yoshimoto, Yuichi Ode, Tomohiro Hakamata, Mio Aoyagi, Kohei Shima, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Yuma Aoki, Yamato Ito, Kindai Univ. (Japan); Daiki Aoki, Tokyo Univ. of Science (Japan); Keitaro Miyazaki, Kohei Kusunoki, Yoshinori Otsuka, Haruhiko Yokosu, Wakana Yonemaru, Kazuhiro Ichikawa, Hanako Nakano, Reo Takemoto, Tsukasa Matsushima, Univ. of Miyazaki (Japan); Kiyoshi Hayashida, Osaka Univ. (Japan)
19 June 2024 • 11:20 - 11:40 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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Xtend is one of the two telescopes onboard the X-ray imaging and spectroscopy mission (XRISM), which was launched on September 7th, 2023. Xtend comprises the Soft X-ray Imager (SXI), an X-ray CCD camera, and the X-ray Mirror Assembly (XMA), a thin-foil-nested conically approximated Wolter-I optics. Before the launch of XRISM, we conducted a month-long spacecraft thermal vacuum test. The performance verification of the SXI was successfully carried out in a course of multiple thermal cycles of the spacecraft. About a month after the launch of XRISM, the SXI has been carefully activated and the soundness of its functionality has been checked by a step-by-step process. We here review these pre- and post-launch status of Xtend. A few initial results verifying the Xtend performance will be also presented.
13093-55
Author(s): Richard L. Kelley, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Hisamitsu Awaki, Ehime Univ. (Japan); Jesus C. Balleza, Kim R. Barnstable, Thomas G. Bialas, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Rozenn Boissay-Malaquin, Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States), NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Gregory V. Brown, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States); Edgar R. Canavan, Timothy M. Carnahan, Meng P. Chiao, Brian J. Comber, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Elisa Costantini, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Renata S. Cumbee, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Jan-Willem A. den Herder, Johannes Dercksen, Cor de Vries, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Michael J. DiPirro, Megan E. Eckart, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Yuichiro Ezoe, Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan); Carlo Ferrigno, Univ. de Genève (Switzerland); Ryuichi Fujimoto, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Nathalie Q. S. Gorter, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Steven M. Graham, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Martin Grim, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Leslie S. Hartz, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Ryota Hayakawa, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, KEK (Japan); Takayuki Hayashi, Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States), NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Natalie Hell, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States); Akio Hoshino, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Yuto Ichinohe, RIKEN (Japan); Daiki Ishi, Manabu Ishida, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Kumi Ishikawa, Yoshitaka Ishisaki, Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan); Bryan L. James, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Yoshiaki Kanemaru, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Steven J. Kenyon, Caroline A. Kilbourne, Mark O. Kimball, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Shunji Kitamoto, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan); Maurice A. Leutenegger, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Yoshitomo Maeda, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Dan McCammon, Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison (United States); Brian J. McLaughlin, Joseph J. Miko, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Erik van der Meer, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Misaki Mizumoto, Univ. of Teacher Education Fukuoka (Japan); Takashi Okajima, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Atsushi Okamoto, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Stéphane Paltani, Univ. de Genève (Switzerland); Frederick S. Porter, Lillian S. Reichenthal, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Kosuke Sato, Saitama Univ. (Japan); Toshiki Sato, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Yohichi Sato, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Makoto Sawada, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan); Keisuke Shinozaki, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Russell F. Shipman, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Peter J. Shirron, Gary A. Sneiderman, Soong Yang, Richard Szymkiewicz, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Andrew E. Szymkowiak, Yale Univ. (United States); Yoh Takei, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Mai Takeo, Saitama Univ. (Japan); Tsubasa Tamba, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Keisuke Tamura, Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States), NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Masahiro Tsujimoto, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan); Yuusuke Uchida, Tokyo Univ. of Science (Japan); Stephen Wasserzug, Michael C. Witthoeft, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Rob Wolfs, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Shinya Yamada, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan); Susumu Yasuda, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan)
19 June 2024 • 11:40 - 12:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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We present the design and performance of the XRISM Soft X-Ray Spectrometer Resolve, successfully launched on a JAXA H-IIA rocket September 7, 2023. The instrument uses a 36-pixel array of microcalorimeters at the focus of a grazing-incidence x-ray mirror. The instrument has achieved an energy resolution of 4.5 eV (FWHM) at 6. The overall cooling chain was designed to provide a lifetime of at least 3 years in orbit and operate without liquid helium to provide redundancy and the longest operational lifetime for the instrument. Early indications that the cryogen lifetime will exceed 4 years. X-rays are focused onto the array with a high-throughput grazing incidence X-ray Mirror Assembly with over 200 nested two-stage X-ray reflectors. A series of onboard X-ray calibrations sources allow simultaneous energy scale calibration lines simultaneously while observing celestial sources. The inflight performance of Resolve will be described along with a summary of the scientific capabilities.
13093-56
Author(s): Frederick S. Porter, Caroline A. Kilbourne, Meng P. Chiao, Renata S. Cumbee, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Megan E. Eckart, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States); Ryuichi Fujimoto, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Yoshitaka Ishisaki, Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan); Richard L. Kelley, Maurice A. Leutenegger, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Misaki Mizumoto, Univ. of Teacher Education Fukuoka (Japan); Makoto Sawada, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan); Gary A. Sneiderman, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Yoh Takei, Masahiro Tsujimoto, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Tomomi Watanabe, Ball Aerospace (United States); Shinya Yamada, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan); Yuusuke Uchida, Tokyo Univ. of Science (Japan); Yoshitomo Maeda, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Kosuke Sato, Saitama Univ. (Japan)
19 June 2024 • 12:00 - 12:15 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The XRISM/Resolve instrument is an on-orbit high-resolution non-dispersive x-ray spectrometer with a resolving power of nearly 1300 at 6 keV and a broad bandpass from below 0.3 keV to above 12 keV. The instrument will provide essential diagnostics for nearly every class of x-ray emitting objects from the atmosphere of Jupiter to the outskirts of galaxy clusters. Here we present the first results of the on-orbit performance of the Resolve detector system after its launch in early September 2023. We compare the performance to the theoretical predictions, preflight measurements, the expected additional noise sources on-orbit, and the performance of the almost identical Hitomi/SXS.
Break
Lunch/Exhibition Break 12:15 - 13:50
Session 13: XRISM II
19 June 2024 • 13:50 - 15:05 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
Session Chair: Wei Cui, Tsinghua Univ. (China)
13093-58
Author(s): Takayuki Hayashi, Rozenn Boissay-Malaquin, Keisuke Tamura, Takashi Okajima, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Megan E. Eckart, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States); Maurice A. Leutenegger, Tahir Yaqoob, Michael Loewenstein, Richard L. Kelley, Frederick S. Porter, Caroline A. Kilbourne, Meng P. Chiao, Gary A. Sneiderman, Renata S. Cumbee, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Yoshitaka Ishisaki, Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan); Ryuichi Fujimoto, Masahiro Tsujimoto, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan), Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan); Makoto Sawada, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan); Misaki Mizumoto, Univ. of Teacher Education Fukuoka (Japan); Yoshitomo Maeda, Yoshiaki Kanemaru, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan), Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan); Toshiki Sato, Meiji Univ. (Japan); Manabu Ishida, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan), Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan)
19 June 2024 • 13:50 - 14:05 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The X-ray astronomy satellite XRISM, which was launched in 2023, carries a high-energy resolution X-ray spectrometer called Resolve. The X-ray Mirror Assembly (XMA) is the X-ray optics of XRISM and Resolve's XMA is called Resolve-XMA. The performance of the Resolve-XMA was extensively measured on the ground and verified to meet the requirements. This presentation reports on the performance of the Resolve-XMA with first observations in orbit. The aim point determination and its accuracy will be presented. The effective area will be measured at different energies. The PSF will be measured in Resolve's 3'x3' FoV with its 35 pixels. With these measurements, we will judge whether the on-board performance differs from the ground measurement result and meets the requirement.
13093-59
Author(s): Keisuke Tamura, Takayuki Hayashi, Rozenn Boissoy-Malaquin, Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States); Takashi Okajima, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Toshiki Sato, Meiji Univ. (Japan); Megan E. Eckart, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States); Maurice A. Leutenegger, Tahir Yaqoob, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Koji Mori, Univ. of Miyazaki (Japan); Manabu Ishida, Yoshitomo Maeda, Hiroshi Tomida, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Hiroshi Nakajima, Kanto Gakuin Univ. (Japan); Hirofumi Noda, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Hiroyuki Uchida, Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Hiromasa Suzuki, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Shogo B. Kobayashi, Tokyo Univ. of Science (Japan); Tomokage Yoneyama, Chuo Univ. (Japan); Kouichi Hagino, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Kumiko K. Nobukawa, Kindai Univ. (Japan); Takaaki Tanaka, Konan Univ. (Japan); Hiroshi Murakami, Tohoku Gakuin Univ. (Japan); Hideki Uchiyama, Shizuoka Univ. (Japan); Masayoshi Nobukawa, Nara Univ. of Education (Japan); Tessei Yoshida, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Hironori Matsumoto, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Takeshi Go Tsuru, Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Makoto Yamauchi, Isamu Hatsukade, Univ. of Miyazaki (Japan); Hirokazu Odaka, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Takayoshi Kohmura, Tokyo Univ. of Science (Japan); Kazutaka Yamaoka, Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Yoshiaki Kanemaru, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Junko S. Hiraga, Kwansei Gakuin Univ. (Japan); Tadayasu Dotani, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Masanobu Ozaki, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (Japan); Hiroshi Tsunemi, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Keitaro Miyazaki, Kohei Kusunoki, Yoshinori Otsuka, Haruhiko Yokosu, Wakana Yonematsu, Kazuhiro Ichikawa, Hanako Nakano, Reo Takemoto, Tsukasa Matsushima, Univ. of Miyazaki (Japan); Yoh Asahina, Masahiro Fukuda, Kanto Gakuin Univ. (Japan); Marina Yoshimoto, Kohei Shima, Mio Aoyagi, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Yuma Aoki, Yamato Ito, Kindai Univ. (Japan); Daiki Aoki, Kaito Fujisawa, Yasuyuki Shimizu, Mayu Higuchi, Tokyo Univ. of Science (Japan); Kiyoshi Hayashida, Osaka Univ. (Japan)
19 June 2024 • 14:05 - 14:20 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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Two complementary X-ray telescopes, Resolve and Xtend are on-boarded on the X-ray astronomy satellite XRISM (X-Ray Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission). In this presentation, in-orbit performance of the Xtend-XMA will be reported. Xtend uses an X-ray CCD camera as its focal plane detector, which has high spatial resolution and a wide field of view. This makes it possible to obtain detailed PSF of the Xtend-XMA. And also the energy resolution of the X-ray CCD camera makes it possible to determine the energy-dependent effective area of the Xtend-XMA. We can verify that these performances are sufficient to meet the mission requirements and that the launch has not affected the performance of Xtend-XMA.
13093-60
Author(s): Katsuhiro Hayashi, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Makoto S. Tashiro, Yukikatsu Terada, Saitama Univ. (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Tessei Yoshida, Shoji Ogawa, Yoshiaki Kanemaru, Kotaro Fukushima, Akio Hoshino, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Hiromitsu Takahashi, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Masayoshi Nobukawa, Nara Univ. of Education (Japan); Tsunefumi Mizuno, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Kazuhiro Nakazawa, Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Shin'ichiro Uno, Nihon Fukushi Univ. (Japan); Ken Ebisawa, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Satoshi Eguchi, Kumamoto Gakuen Univ. (Japan); Satoru Katsuda, Saitama Univ. (Japan); Takao Kitaguchi, RIKEN (Japan); Aya Kubota, Shibaura Institute of Technology (Japan); Naomi Ota, Nara Women's Univ. (Japan); Megumi Shidatsu, Ehime Univ. (Japan); Atsushi Tanimoto, Kagoshima Univ. (Japan); Yuichi Terashima, Ehime Univ. (Japan); Yohko Tsuboi, Chuo Univ. (Japan); Yuusuke Uchida, Tokyo Univ. of Science (Japan); Hideki Uchiyama, Shizuoka Univ. (Japan); Shigeo Yamauchi, Nara Women's Univ. (Japan); Tomokage Yoneyama, Chuo Univ. (Japan); Satoshi Yamada, RIKEN (Japan); Eric D. Miller, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); Nagomi Uchida, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Seiko Sakurai, Saitama Univ. (Japan); Shin Watanabe, Ryo Iizuka, Rie Sato, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Chris Baluta, NASA (United States); Takayuki Tamura, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Yasushi Fukazawa, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Hirokazu Odaka, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Tsubasa Tamba, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Ryohei Sato, So Kato, Minami Sakama, Saitama Univ. (Japan); Yuki Niida, Ehime Univ. (Japan); Natsuki Sakamoto, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Takumi Shioiri, Saitama Univ. (Japan); Noboru Nemoto, Chuo Univ. (Japan); Yuki Omiya, Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Nari Suzuki, Nara Women's Univ. (Japan); Matt Holland, NASA (United States); Michael Loewenstein, NASA (United States), Univ. of Maryland, College Park (United States); Tahir Yaqoob, Robert S. Hill, Trisha F. Doyle, Efrain Perez-Solis, Morgan D. Waddy, Mark Mekosh, Joseph B. Fox, NASA (United States); Matteo Guainazzi, Jan-Uwe Ness, European Space Agency (Spain); Hironori Maejima, Kenichi Toda, Chikara Natsukari, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan)
19 June 2024 • 14:20 - 14:35 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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We report on the current status of XRISM science operations from the launch to today, with an introduction of the ground system in XRISM science operations. Currently, XRISM is in the initial observation phase, and operations during the start-up of mission instruments and data processing of the observation data are being carried out. After the transition to the nominal operation phase, we plan and operate observations of each celestial target for in-orbit calibration and functionality checks, and process the data. We also start to call for proposals for Guest Observers and set up a help desk, which provides analysis supports for users.
13093-61
Author(s): Yukikatsu Terada, Saitama Univ. (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Megumi Shidatsu, Ehime Univ. (Japan); Takashi Kominato, NEC Corp. (Japan); So Kato, Ryohei Sato, Minami Sakama, Takumi Shioiri, Saitama Univ. (Japan); Yuki Niida, Ehime Univ. (Japan); Makoto Sawada, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan); Chikara Natsukari, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Makoto S. Tashiro, Saitama Univ. (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Kenichi Toda, Hironori Maejima, Katsuhiro Hayashi, Tessei Yoshida, Shoji Ogawa, Yoshiaki Kanemaru, Akio Hoshino, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Hiromitsu Takahashi, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Masayoshi Nobukawa, Nara Univ. of Education (Japan); Tsunefumi Mizuno, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Kazuhiro Nakazawa, Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Shin'ichiro Uno, Nihon Fukushi Univ. (Japan); Ken Ebisawa, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Satoshi Eguchi, Fukuoka Univ. (Japan); Satoru Katsuda, Saitama Univ. (Japan); Aya Kubota, Shibaura Institute of Technology (Japan); Naomi Ota, Nara Women's Univ. (Japan); Atsushi Tanimoto, Kagoshima Univ. (Japan); Yuichi Terashima, Ehime Univ. (Japan); Yohko Tsuboi, Chuo Univ. (Japan); Yuusuke Uchida, Tokyo Univ. of Science (Japan); Hideki Uchiyama, Shizuoka Univ. (Japan); Shigeo Yamauchi, Nara Women's Univ. (Japan); Tomokage Yoneyama, Chuo Univ. (Japan); Satoshi Yamada, RIKEN (Japan); Nagomi Uchida, Shin Watanabe, Ryo Iizuka, Rie Sato, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Chris Baluta, Matt Holland, NASA (United States); Michael Loewenstein, NASA (United States), Univ. of Maryland, College Park (United States); Eric D. Miller, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); Tahir Yaqoob, Robert S. Hill, Trisha F. Doyle, Efrain Perez-Solis, Morgan D. Waddy, Mark Mekosh, Joseph B. Fox, NASA (United States)
19 June 2024 • 14:35 - 14:50 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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We summarize the detail design of the timing system of newly born X-ray satellite XRISM, including both onboard instruments and off-line data-processing tools. The absolute timing accuracy of 1.0 msec is required for the system. We also report the results of both the ground timing test and in-orbit verification observation using a millisecond pulsar on the timing performance of the XRISM timing system in the nominal operating mode, i.e., assigning time stamp using the GPS signals from the GPS receiver onboard the spacecraft.
13093-62
Author(s): Megan E. Eckart, Gregory V. Brown, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States); Meng P. Chiao, Renata S. Cumbee, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Ryuichi Fujimoto, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan), Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan); Natalie Hell, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States); Akio Hoshino, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan), Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan); Yoshitaka Ishisaki, Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan); Richard L. Kelley, Steven J. Kenyon, Caroline A. Kilbourne, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Shunji Kitamoto, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan); Maurice A. Leutenegger, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Thomas E. Lockard, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States); Michael Loewenstein, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States), Univ. of Maryland, College Park (United States); Edward W. Magee, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States); Misaki Mizumoto, Univ. of Teacher Education Fukuoka (Japan); Frederick S. Porter, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Kosuke Sato, Saitama Univ. (Japan); Makoto Sawada, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan); Chintan D. Shah, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Russell F. Shipman, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Gary A. Sneiderman, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Yoh Takei, Masahiro Tsujimoto, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan), Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan); Cor P. de Vries, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Tomomi Watanabe, BAE Systems, Inc. (United States); Michael C. Witthoeft, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Rob Wolfs, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Shinya Yamada, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan); Tahir Yaqoob, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States), Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States)
19 June 2024 • 14:50 - 15:05 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The Resolve instrument aboard the X-ray Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission (XRISM) is a 36-pixel microcalorimeter spectrometer that provides non-dispersive spectroscopy with ~5 eV spectral resolution in the soft x-ray waveband. Resolve has a requirement to provide absolute energy-scale calibration of +/- 2 eV from 0.3-12 keV. In this presentation we describe our ground calibration strategy and results of calibration campaigns from 2018-2022, including a discussion of improvements in the ground calibration approach compared to Hitomi and a description of Resolve's final pre-launch gain scales, which indicate that the energy scale of the array can be absolutely calibrated to better than +/- 0.5 eV from 0.3-17.5 keV. We provide an assessment of how well these pre-launch gain scales correct on-orbit data and discuss approaches for updating the gain curves.
Break
Coffee Break 15:05 - 15:35
Session 14: Detectors
19 June 2024 • 15:35 - 17:15 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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Author(s): Marshall W. Bautz, Eric D. Miller, Gregory Prigozhin, Beverly LaMarr, Andrew Malonis, Richard F. Foster, Catherine E. Grant, Benjamin Schneider, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); Christopher Leitz, Kevan Donlon, Ilya Prigozhin, Renee Lambert, Michael Cooper, MIT Lincoln Lab. (United States); Sven C. Herrmann, Peter Orel, Tanmoy Chattopadhyay, Glenn Morris, Dan R. Wilkins, Haley R. Stueber, Artem Poliszczuk, Steven W. Allen, Stanford Univ. (United States)
19 June 2024 • 15:35 - 15:55 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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High spatial- and spectral-resolution X-ray capabilities are essential for future strategic missions to address the key priorities set forth by the Astro2020 Decadal Survey This will require megapixel X-ray imaging detectors more capable than any available today, providing frame rates at least a factor of 20 faster and pixel aspect ratios twice as large, while retaining the low noise and excellent spectral performance of current instruments. We present recent results from our NASA-funded technology development effort to produce a prototype CCD detector for AXIS, the Advanced X-ray Imaging Satellite mission concept recently submitted in response to the NASA Astrophysics Probe call. Thi project is developing a 16-output, 1440 x 1440 pixel frame-store CCD with the same pixel size (24 µm) and depletion depth (100 µm) as the proposed AXIS detector. This device uses the low-voltage, single-polysilicon gate and low-noise pJFET technologies proven in previous work. We describe our strategy for optimizing CCD output amplifier design, present results from testing a similar, prior-generation CCD with the Multi-Channel Readout Chip (MCRC) ASIC developed at Stanford University.
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Author(s): Nicholas Shade, Dartmouth College (United States); Gillian Kyne, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Edoardo Charbon, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (Switzerland); Eric Fossum, Dartmouth College (United States); Shouleh Nikzad, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
19 June 2024 • 15:55 - 16:15 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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Photon counting detectors have made large strides in recent years. Quanta image sensor (QIS), the electron-multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD), and single photon avalanche diode (SPAD) are three leading single photon counting silicon technologies. An example of each device has been fully characterized and evaluated. Their performance and value add have been determined for future space flight missions.
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Author(s): Dan R. Wilkins, Artem Poliszczuk, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics & Cosmology (United States); Benjamin Schneider, MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research (United States); Steven W. Allen, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics & Cosmology (United States); Eric D. Miller, Marshall W. Bautz, MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research (United States); Tanmoy Chattopadhyay, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics & Cosmology (United States); Abraham D. Falcone, The Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States); Richard F. Foster, Catherine E. Grant, MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research (United States); Sven C. Herrmann, Glenn Morris, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics & Cosmology (United States); Paul E. J. Nulsen, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (United States); Peter Orel, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics & Cosmology (United States); Gerrit Schellenberger, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (United States)
19 June 2024 • 16:15 - 16:35 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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Bringing artificial intelligence (AI) alongside next-generation X-ray imaging detectors, including CCDs, DEPFET and CMOS sensors, enhances their sensitivity to achieve many of the flagship science cases targeted by future X-ray observatories, based upon low surface brightness and high redshift sources. Machine learning algorithms operating on the raw frame-level data provide enhanced identification of background vs. astrophysical X-ray events, and enhanced energy reconstruction, by considering all of the signals in a single frame holistically. We have developed prototype machine learning algorithms to identify valid X-ray and cosmic-ray induced background events, trained and tested upon a suite of realistic end-to-end simulations that trace the interaction of cosmic ray particles and their secondaries through the spacecraft and detector. These algorithms demonstrate that AI can reduce the unrejected instrumental background by up to 30% compared with traditional filtering methods, and can recover up to 98% of valid X-ray signals that are often rejected.
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Author(s): Juan Cruz Estrada, Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (United States)
19 June 2024 • 16:35 - 16:55 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The DarkNESS CubeSat will deploy skipper-CCDs, the most sensitive silicon detectors to date, on a nano-satellite to study the diffuse X-ray background in the Milky Way and search for Dark Matter (DM). DM is an abundant, but invisible, presence in our Universe. It dictates how galaxies were initially formed and influences their dynamics today. The total mass of DM in the universe is known to be five times that of ordinary matter, but its true nature remains elusive, and its identity is one of the biggest questions in science today. We will search for DM by mapping the Galaxy's diffuse X-ray spectrum using an array of skipper-CCDs on a nanosatellite in LEO. This will address the experimental conundrum associated with the observation of an unidentified 3.5~keV X-ray line, potentially produced from the decay of a DM particle. The mission will also perform a direct search for low-mass, strongly-interacting DM candidate particles that would not penetrate the Earth’s atmosphere and are therefore inaccessible to terrestrial DM experiments
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Author(s): Artem Poliszczuk, Dan R. Wilkins, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics & Cosmology (United States); Steven W. Allen, Stanford Univ. (United States); Eric D. Miller, MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research (United States); Tanmoy Chattopadhyay, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics & Cosmology (United States); Benjamin Schneider, MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research (United States); Julien E. Darve, Stanford Univ. (United States); Marshall W. Bautz, MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research (United States); Abraham D. Falcone, The Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States); Rick F. Foster, Catherine E. Grant, MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research (United States); Sven C. Herrmann, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics & Cosmology (United States); Ralph P. Kraft, Ctr. for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian (United States); Glenn Morris, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics & Cosmology (United States); Paul E. J. Nulsen, Ctr. for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian (United States); Peter Orel, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics & Cosmology (United States); Gerrit Schellenberger, Ctr. for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian (United States); Haley R. Stueber, Stanford Univ. (United States)
19 June 2024 • 16:55 - 17:15 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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Pixelated detectors aboard modern space X-ray telescopes offer excellent, simultaneous imaging and spectroscopic capabilities. However, in orbit measurements with these devices are hampered by the background induced by charged particles, primarily cosmic-ray protons, interacting with the spacecraft and detectors, which makes the task of studying faint, low surface brightness objects challenging. The traditional background reduction algorithms analyze the deposited signal as a separate, multiple-pixel island, ignoring contextual information present on the same readout frame. Machine learning models can effectively capture this context by recognizing spatial and energetic correlations between signals left by a primary cosmic ray and secondaries produced during interaction of the incident particle with the body of the detector. In this work we present a study of different approaches to maximize the context information available to the deep neural network models to further improve the background reduction capabilities.
Thursday Plenary
20 June 2024 • 08:30 - 10:00 Japan Standard Time | National Convention Hall, 1F

View Full Details: spie.org/AS/thursday-plenary

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Author(s): Jessica T. Dempsey, ASTRON (Netherlands)
20 June 2024 • 08:30 - 09:15 Japan Standard Time | National Convention Hall, 1F
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The next decade heralds a renaissance in radio astronomy, with a formidable complement of global Observatories, from LOFAR2.0, to the SKA becoming powerful discovery engines at these lowest frequencies. While they commit to lowering data access barriers, managing the deluge of data poses challenges, as the new constraint on viable astronomy must move from hours on sky to data product cost in energy, compute and carbon and data footprint. I will explore with you the challenges and opportunities in creating a new frontier of sustainable, ethical, affordable astronomy.
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Author(s): Makoto S. Tashiro, Saitama Univ. (Japan)
20 June 2024 • 09:15 - 10:00 Japan Standard Time | National Convention Hall, 1F
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The X-Ray Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission (XRISM) project was initiated in 2018 as the recovery mission resuming the high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy with imaging once realized but unexpectedly terminated by a mishap of ASTRO-H/Hitomi. XRISM carries a pixelized X-ray micro-calorimeter array and an X-ray CCD on the focal planes of two sets of X-ray mirror assemblies. The spacecraft was successfully launched from JAXA Tanegashima Space Center on September 7, 2023, and is now conducting performance verification observation followed by guest observations starting in August 2024. In this paper, we present the history of development and recent results.
Break
Coffee Break 10:00 - 10:20
Session 15: Missions I
20 June 2024 • 10:20 - 12:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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Author(s): Ettore Del Monte, Yuri Evangelista, Marco Feroci, Francesco Ceraudo, Alessio Nuti, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Riccardo Campana, INAF - Osservatorio di Astrofisica e Scienza dello Spazio (Italy); Mauro Fiorini, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica cosmica Milano (Italy); Gianluigi Zampa, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Francesca Esposito, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte (Italy); Immacolata Donnarumma, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (Italy); Ugo Cortesi, Istituto di Fisica Applicata "Nello Carrara" (Italy); Fabio D'Amico, INAF - Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica (Italy); Alessandro Turchi, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (Italy); Marco Gai, Istituto di Fisica Applicata "Nello Carrara" (Italy); Andrea Argan, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy)
20 June 2024 • 10:20 - 10:40 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The Lunar Electromagnetic Monitor in X-rays (LEM-X) is an imager for X-ray Astronomy to be installed on the surface of the Moon and is funded by the Italian Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica (INAF) in the framework of the Italian "Piano Nazionale di Ripresa e Resilienza (PNRR)". The building block of LEM-X is represented by a pair of coded aperture cameras, each one built around four large-area linear Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) and able to image the sky within a field of view of ~1 sr with a source location accuracy of ~1 arcmin, while at the same time reaching a spectral resolution better than 350 eV FWHM at 6 keV. The LEM-X instrument preliminarly envisages about ten such camera pairs, arranged on a dome-like structure on the surface of the Moon, to reach a sensitivity better than 5 mCrab in 50 ks and 1 Crab in 1 s in the 2 -- 50 keV energy band. In this contribution we describe the design of LEM-X, we discuss the scientific performance and we report the status of the instrument development.
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Author(s): Clara Plasse, Diego Götz, Aline Meuris, Philippe Ferrando, Benjamin Schneider, Diana Renaud, Marin Prieur, François Visticot, Leo Favier, Eric Doumayrou, Frédéric Pinsard, CEA (France); Karine Mercier, Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales (France); Norbert Meidinger, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
20 June 2024 • 10:40 - 11:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The Micro-channel X-ray Telescope (MXT) is the X-ray telescope aboard the SVOM mission, to be launched in Spring 2024. The MXT camera is housing a 256×256 pixels pnCCD detector, characterised in 2021 at the PANTER facility during the end-to-end tests of the flight instrument. The MXT camera will suffer from proton irradiation when SVOM crosses Earth’s radiation belts. A spare model was irradiated at the Arronax cyclotron facility, and then characterized at the X-ray Metrology beamline of the SOLEIL Synchrotron facility. This work reviews the characterization of detector before and after irradiation, in order to evaluate the scientific performances of MXT camera over the SVOM mission lifetime. Some preliminary in-flight data may also be presented.
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Author(s): Wei Cui, Tsinghua Univ. (China)
20 June 2024 • 11:00 - 11:20 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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Hot Universe Baryon Surveyor (HUBS) is proposed as a dedicated probe of hot gas in galaxy ecosystems, which is beyond the capabilities of current X-ray observatories but holds a key to understanding galaxy evolution. It employs a non-dispersive spectrometer based on TES microcalorimeters, enabling both high-resolution spectroscopy and imaging. In this contribution, we briefly describe the progress on the development of TES microcalorimeters for HUBS, as well as that of supporting key technologies including frequency-division multiplexing readout electronics, cryocoolers and adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator, and wide-field X-ray optics. We also show the design of a pathfinder experiment (DIXE), which is being considered for inclusion in the science portfolio of the China Space Station, not only to advance the TRLs of the key technologies for HUBS, but to conduct a high-resolution X-ray spectroscopic survey for the first time.
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Author(s): Abraham D. Falcone, Joseph M. Colosimo, Mitchell Wages, Michael Betts, William A. Bevidas, Jacob C. Buffington, David N. Burrows, Zachary E. Catlin, Timothy Emeigh, Derek B. Fox, The Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States); David M. Palmer, Los Alamos National Lab. (United States); Collin Reichard, Ana C. Scigliani, Lukas R. Stone, Ian Thornton, Daniel Washington, Michael E. Zugger, The Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States)
20 June 2024 • 11:20 - 11:40 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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BlackCAT is an X-ray coded-aperture-telescope on a 6U CubeSat platform that is expected to launch in 2025. It is designed for observations of X-ray sources and new transients in the 0.5–20 keV band. The instrument will have a wide field of view (0.85 steradian) and be capable of catching gamma ray bursts from the distant universe, galactic transients, flares from blazars, and monitoring the X-ray sky for rare and exciting events including gravitational-wave X-ray counterparts, magnetar flares, supernova shock breakouts, and tidal disruption events. The mission will thus function as a multiwavelength/messenger complement to present and future facilities, while providing rapid notifications. Silicon X-ray hybrid CMOS detectors will form the focal plane array. In addition to carrying out its science programs, BlackCAT will also serve as a pathfinder for future economical sky monitoring networks. An overview of mission design, science, and status will be presented.
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Author(s): Marco Feroci, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Walter Bonvicini, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Fangjun Lu, Institute of High Energy Physics (China); Manuel Guedel, Univ. Wien (Austria); Malgorzata Michalska, Space Research Ctr. of the Polish Academy of Sciences (Poland); Andrea Santangelo, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany); Stéphane Schanne, CEA (France); Vladimír Karas, Astronomical Institute of the CAS, v.v.i. (Czech Republic); Xin Wu, Univ. de Genève (Switzerland); Shuang-Nan Zhang, Institute of High Energy Physics (China); Gianluigi Zampa, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy)
20 June 2024 • 11:40 - 12:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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(Additional authors not shown) The Large Area Detector (LAD) is the high-throughput, spectral-timing instrument onboard the eXTP mission, a major project of CAS and CNSA with a large European participation. The eXTP mission is currently completing its phase B study, with a target launch at the end-2029. The eXTP scientific payload includes four instruments (SFA, PFA, LAD and WFM) offering unprecedented simultaneous wide-band X-ray timing and polarimetry sensitivity. The LAD instrument design envisages a deployed 3 m2 effective area in the 2-30 keV energy range, achieved through the technology of the large-area Silicon Drift Detectors - offering a spectral resolution of up to 200 eV FWHM at 6 keV - and of capillary plate collimators - limiting the field of view to about 1 degree. In this paper we will provide an overview of the LAD instrument design, its current status of development and anticipated performance.
Break
Lunch/Exhibition Break 12:00 - 13:20
Session 16: Missions II
20 June 2024 • 13:20 - 15:20 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
Session Chair: Jessica A. Gaskin, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
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Author(s): Margarita Hernanz, Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (Spain), Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (Spain); Marco Feroci, Yuri Evangelista, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Aline Meuris, Stéphane Schanne, CEA-IRFU (France); Gianluigi Zampa, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Chris Tenzer, Jörg Bayer, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany); Witold Nowosielski, Malgorzata Michalska, Space Research Ctr. of the Polish Academy of Sciences (Poland); Emrah Kalemci, Sabanci Univ. (Turkey); Müberra Sungur, TÜBITAK Space Technologies Research Institute (Turkey); Søren Brandt, Irfan Kuvvetli, Technical Univ. of Denmark (Denmark); Alessandro Patruno, José-Luis Gálvez, Alex Carmona, Daniel Alvarez Franco, Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (Spain), Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (Spain); Jean In't Zand, Frans Zwart, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Andrea Santangelo, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany); Enrico Bozzo, Univ. de Genève (Switzerland)
20 June 2024 • 13:20 - 13:40 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The eXTP (enhanced X-ray Timing and Polarimetry) mission is a major project of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), with a large involvement of Europe. The scientific payload of eXTP includes four instruments: SFA (Spectroscopy Focusing Array) and PFA (Polarimetry Focusing Array) - led by China - LAD (Large Area Detector) and WFM (Wide Field Monitor) - led by Europe (Italy and Spain, respectively). eXTP with its set of four instruments offers an unique simultaneous wide-band X-ray timing and polarimetry sensitivity. In particular, the WFM for eXTP will be a wide field X-ray monitor instrument in the 2-50 keV energy range. It will have an unprecedented combination of large field of view and imaging, with a very good spectral resolution, down to 2 keV. This will allow eXTP making very relevant discoveries of the variable and transient X-ray sky. Currently eXTP/WFM is in phase B2, after successfully undergoing the I-SRR (Instrument System Requirements Review) in mid-2023. Besides an overview of the eXTP/WFM, the more relevant details about the current work in Phase B2, including the manufacturing and testing of the demonstration models of the WFM subsystems, will be presented.
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Author(s): Yuri Evangelista, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Riccardo Campana, INAF (Italy); Alejandro Guzmán Cabrera, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany); Fabrizio Fiore, Giulia Baroni, INAF (Italy); Giovanni Della Casa, Giuseppe Dilillo, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Mauro Fiorini, INAF (Italy); Paul Hedderman, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany); Ezequiel J. Marchesini, Gianluca Morgante, Paolo Nogara, INAF (Italy); Alessio Nuti, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Samuel Pliego-Caballero, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany); Irina Rashevskaya, Trento Institute for Fundamental Physics and Applications (Italy); Francesco Russo, Giuseppe Sottile, Sara Trevisan, INAF (Italy); Francesco Ceraudo, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Marco Citossi, INAF (Italy); Evgeny Demenev, Fondazione Bruno Kessler (Italy); Giuseppe Bertuccio, Irisa Dedolli, Politecnico di Milano (Italy); Marco Feroci, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Francesco Ficorella, Fondazione Bruno Kessler (Italy); Marco Grassi, Univ. degli Studi di Pavia (Italy); Filippo Mele, Politecnico di Milano (Italy); Piero Malcovati, Univ. degli Studi di Pavia (Italy); Alexander Rashevsky, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Andrea Santangelo, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany); Gianluigi Zampa, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Nicola Zampa, Univ. degli Studi di Udine (Italy)
20 June 2024 • 13:40 - 14:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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HERMES (High Energy Rapid Modular Ensemble of Satellites) is a space-borne mission based on a constellation of six nano-satellites flying in a low-Earth orbit (LEO). The 3U CubeSats, to be launched end-2024, host miniaturised instruments with a hybrid Silicon Drift Detector/GAGG:Ce scintillator photodetector system, sensitive to X-rays and gamma-rays in a large energy band. HERMES will operate in conjunction with Australian Space Industry Responsive Intelligent Thermal (SpIRIT) 6U CubeSat, to be launched in late 2023. HERMES will probe the temporal emission of bright high-energy transients such as Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), ensuring a fast transient localization (with arcmin-level accuracy) in a field of view of several steradians exploiting the triangulation technique. HERMES intrinsically modular transient monitoring experiment represents a keystone capability to complement the next generation of gravitational wave experiments. Here we’ll outline the scientific case, development and programmatic status of the mission.
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Author(s): Daisuke Yonetoku, Kanazawa Univ. (Japan); Akihiro Doi, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Tatehiro Mihara, RIKEN (Japan); Takanori Sakamoto, Aoyama Gakuin Univ. (Japan); Makoto Arimoto, Kanazawa Univ. (Japan); Kohji Tsumura, Tokyo City Univ. (Japan); Hideo Matsuhara, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Shuji Matsuura, Kwansei Gakuin Univ. (Japan); Tatsuya Sawano, Kanazawa Univ. (Japan); Shuichi Gunji, Yamagata Univ. (Japan); Akihiro Miyasaka, Tokyo City Univ. (Japan); Yusuke Kono, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (Japan); Hiroshi Akitaya, Chiba Institute of Technology (Japan); Junko S. Hiraga, Kwansei Gakuin Univ. (Japan); Nobutaka Bando, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Ichiro Jikuya, Kanazawa Univ. (Japan); Koji Kawabata, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Teruaki Enoto, RIKEN (Japan); Nobuyuki Kawai, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Shunsuke Kurosawa, Tohoku Univ. (Japan); Motoko Serino, Satoshi Sugita, Aoyama Gakuin Univ. (Japan); Makoto S. Tashiro, Saitama Univ. (Japan); Toru Tamagawa, RIKEN (Japan); Keisuke Tamura, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Takaaki Tanaka, Konan Univ. (Japan); Toru Tanimori, Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Hiroshi Tomida, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Yujin Nakagawa, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (Japan); Yoshitomo Maeda, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Ikuyuki Mitsuishi, Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Toshio Murakami, Kanazawa Univ. (Japan); Yoichi Yatsu, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Makoto Yamauchi, Univ. of Miyazaki (Japan); Kazutaka Yamaoka, Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Atsumasa Yoshida, Aoyama Gakuin Univ. (Japan); Yoshifusa Ita, Tohoku Univ. (Japan); Yuji Urata, National Central Univ. (Taiwan); Hirofumi Okita, Subaru Telescope, NAOJ (United States); Kei Sano, Kyushu Institute of Technology (Japan); Masaomi Tanaka, Tohoku Univ. (Japan); Norio Narita, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Hirofumi Noda, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Akihiko Fukui, Kentaro Motohara, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Kenshi Yanagisawa, Michitoshi Yoshida, Takehiko Wada, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (Japan); Keisuke Shinozaki, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Katsuaki Asano, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Kunihito Ioka, Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Hirotaka Ito, RIKEN (Japan); Kohei Inayoshi, Peking Univ. (China); Susumu Inoue, Chiba Univ. (Japan); Norita Kawanaka, Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Shota Kisaka, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Tomoya Kinugawa, Shinshu Univ. (Japan); Kenta Kiuchi, Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik (Germany); Kotaro Kyutoku, Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Yudai Suwa, Kyoto Sangyo Univ. (Japan); Keitaro Takahashi, Kumamoto Univ. (Japan); Takahiro Tanaka, Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Kenji Toma, Tohoku Univ. (Japan); Tomonori Totani, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Hiroki Nagakura, Princeton Univ. (United States); Shigehiro Nagataki, RIKEN (Japan); Takashi Nakamura, Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Yuu Niino, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Jin Matsumoto, Keio Univ. (Japan); Akira Mizuta, RIKEN (Japan); Kohta Murase, The Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States); Ryo Yamazaki, Aoyama Gakuin Univ. (Japan); Jun'ichi Yokoyama, Yoshikazu Nakada, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Hideyuki Izumiura, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (Japan); Naoki Takase, Kanazawa Univ. (Japan); Shunichi Nakatsubo, Tooru Kaga, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Naoki Ogino, Hatsune Goto, Shuta Takahashi, Tomoya Sato, Kanazawa Univ. (Japan); Hsien-Chieh Shen, Aoyama Gakuin Univ. (Japan); Takumi Togashi, Ryuji Sato, Yamagata Univ. (Japan); Ryuji Kondo, Kanazawa Univ. (Japan); Haruki Fukui, Tokyo City Univ. (Japan); Issin Nagataka, Kanazawa Univ. (Japan); Shintaro Ikunaga, Aoyama Gakuin Univ. (Japan); Sou Tajima, Tokyo City Univ. (Japan); Keito Watanabe, Yamagata Univ. (Japan); Taiki Owari, Junyi Li, Aoyama Gakuin Univ. (Japan); Kenjiro Fujimoto, Masataka Sato, Kwansei Gakuin Univ. (Japan); Yuichi Harikane, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Mariko Kimura, Kanazawa Univ. (Japan)
20 June 2024 • 14:00 - 14:20 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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HiZ-GUNDAM is a candidate of future satellite for the Japanese competitive M-class mission by ISAS/JAXA to progress a time-domain astronomy and multi-messenger astronomy with gamma-ray burst (GRB) phenomena. The science goals are (1) to probe the early universe with high redshift GRBs at z > 7, and (2) to promote the gravitational wave and neutrino astronomy with X-ray transients. HiZ-GUNDAM team is working on the concept study phase. We will introduce the sciences and mission overview of HiZ-GUNDAM as well as the latest status.
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Author(s): Takanori Sakamoto, Aoyama Gakuin Univ. (Japan); Daisuke Yonetoku, Kanazawa Univ. (Japan); Akihiro Doi, Hideo Matsuhara, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan); Tatehiro Mihara, RIKEN (Japan); Makoto Arimoto, Tatsuya Sawano, Kanazawa Univ. (Japan); Shuichi Gunji, Yamagata Univ. (Japan); Junko S. Hiraga, Kwansei Gakuin Univ. (Japan)
20 June 2024 • 14:20 - 14:40 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The HiZ-GUNDAM mission is one of the candidates for the JAXA's competitive M-class missions. HiZ-GUNDAM revolutionizes our understanding of the high redshift universe and promotes multi-messenger astronomy. Combining a highly sensitive wide-field X-ray monitor, a near-infrared telescope, and autonomous spacecraft slew capability makes a powerful machine to hunt interesting X-ray transients and immediately identify their counterparts in near-infrared. The Wide Field X-ray Monitor (WFXM) is the main instrument to search for the transients in the soft X-ray band. WFXM comprises lobster-eye optics (LEO) and pnCCD as an X-ray imager. LEO has a size of 40 mm x 40 mm and a radius of curvature of 600 mm. We are planning to use the LEO manufactured by Photonis Inc. One WFXM module has three by three LEOs, which cover a field of view of 12 deg x 12 deg. The current baseline design is composed of 16 modules to cover ~0.7 sr sky. The candidate focal imager is the pnCCD detector by PNSensor Inc. We will present the current status and prospects of the WFXM.
13093-77
Author(s): Hatsune Goto, Daisuke Yonetoku, Tomoya Sato, Isshin Nagataka, Kazuma Mukai, Makoto Arimoto, Tatsuya Sawano, Naoki Takase, Kanazawa Univ. (Japan); Takanori Sakamoto, Taiki Owari, Aoyama Gakuin Univ. (Japan); Tatehiro Mihara, RIKEN (Japan); Tooru Kaga, Shunichi Nakatsubo, Hideo Matsuhara, Maeda Yoshitomo, Akihiro Doi, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan)
20 June 2024 • 14:40 - 15:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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HiZ-GUNDAM is a future satellite mission for gamma-ray burst observations. One of the mission instruments is the wide-field X-ray monitor with a field of view (FoV) of ~0.5 steradian at 0.4–4.0 keV, consisting of Lobster Eye Optics (LEO) and pnCCD image sensors. LEOs need to be spatially well-aligned to achieve both of wide FoV and fine position accuracy of < 3 arcmin. To address this challenge, we explored an alignment method with X-rays and developed an optical frame. This study reports on the evaluation of the optical frame, our alignment method, and x-ray performance of the optical system.
13093-78
Author(s): Kazuki Ampuku, Koki Sakuta, Ryuto Fujii, Yusuke Yoshida, Kumiko Okada, Keitoku Yoshihira, Tetsuo Kano, Naoki Ishida, Wataru Kato, Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Yoshitaka Inoue, IMV Corp. (Japan); Keisuke Tamura, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Kikuko Miyata, Meijo Univ. (Japan); Noriyuki Narukage, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (Japan); Gota Yamaguchi, RIKEN (Japan); Shunsuke Ito, Shutaro Mohri, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Takehiro Kume, Yusuke Matsuzawa, Yoichi Imamura, Takahiro Saito, Kentarou Hiraguri, Hirokazu Hashizume, Natsume Optical Corp. (Japan); Hidekazu Mimura, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Ikuyuki Mitsuishi, Nagoya Univ. (Japan)
20 June 2024 • 15:00 - 15:20 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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We have been developing X-ray optics for a fourth FOXSI (Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager) sounding rocket experiment, FOXSI-4. We fabricated two types of X-ray optics specified for soft and hard X-ray observations and finally evaluated environmental tolerance required such as random vibration. Additionally, we conducted X-ray irradiation tests at 2-18 keV using a large area beam to evaluate X-ray performances such as FWHM, HPD (Half Power Diameter), and effective area. Consequently, we obtained <5 / <3 arcsec (detection limit) in FWHM, ~16 / ~20 arcsec in HPD and ~18 / ~41 mm^2 in on-axis effective area for both soft and hard X-ray optics, respectively. Additionally, we constructed our original ray-tracing simulator and confirmed that the resultant energy dependence of the effective area is consistent with the expected values. We will report the details and the latest status of our optics.
Break
Coffee Break 15:20 - 15:50
Session 17: Missions Probe Class Proposals
20 June 2024 • 15:50 - 17:50 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
Session Chair: Marco Feroci, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy)
13093-79
Author(s): Valerie Connaughton, Antonino Cucchiara, Rachele Cocks, NASA (United States)
20 June 2024 • 15:50 - 16:10 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The Decadal Survey on Astronomy and Astrophysics 2020 issued in 2021 by the National Academies delivered strong recommendations for NASA to consider future missions to complement detections of gravitational waves and neutrinos with electromagnetic observations in space, and more generally to sustain its fleet of missions that contribute to the science enabled by multi-messenger and time-domain astronomy. In this presentation we discuss the current technology investments by NASA in this vibrant field, including detector development, infrastructure, suborbital experiments, and small satellites.
13093-80
Author(s): Kristin K. Madsen, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Daniel Stern, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States), Caltech (United States); Javier Garcia, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Matteo Bachetti, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari (Italy); Stephano Bianchi, Univ. degli Studi di Roma Tre (Italy); Murray Brightman, Caltech (United States); Esra Bulbul, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Francesca Civano, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Joel Coley, Howard Univ. (United States); Melania Del Santo, INAF (Italy); Laura Di Gesu, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (Italy); Chris Fragile, College of Charleston (United States); Suvi Gezari, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States); Brian W. Grefenstette, Fiona A. Harrison, Caltech (United States); Giorgio Lanzuisi, INAF (Italy); Bret Lehmer, Univ. of Arkansas (United States); Rafaella Marqutti, Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States); Andrea Merloni, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Kaya Mori, Columbia Univ. (United States); Kirpal Nandra, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Kerstin Perez, Columbia Univ. (United States); Gabriele Ponti, INAF (Italy); Peter Predehl, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Simonetta Puccetti, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (Italy); Arne Rau, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Andrea Santangelo, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany); Daniele Spiga, INAF (Italy); John Tomsick, Space Sciences Lab. (United States); Dominic Walton, Univ. of Hertfordshire (United Kingdom); Joern Wilms, Friedrich-Alexander-Univ. Erlangen-Nürnberg (Germany); William W. Zhang, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
20 June 2024 • 16:10 - 16:30 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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HEX-P is a probe-class mission concept that combines the power of high angular resolution with broad bandpass coverage to provide the necessary leap in capabilities to address the important astrophysical questions of the next decade. HEX-P achieves its breakthrough performance by combining technologies developed by experienced partners and international collaborations. HEX-P will be launched into L1 for a high observing efficiency, and to meet the science goals the payload consists of a suite of three co-aligned X-ray telescopes designed to cover the 0.2 - 80 keV bandpass where accretion is at its peak. The High Energy Telescope (HET) has an effective bandpass of 2-80 keV, and the Low Energy Telescope (LET) an effective bandpass of 0.2-20 keV. The combination of bandpass and high observing efficiency delivers a powerful General Observer platform for a broad science that services a wide community base. The baseline mission is 5 years, with 30% of t
13093-81
Author(s): Randall K. Smith, Ctr. for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian (United States)
20 June 2024 • 16:30 - 16:50 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The Arcus Probe mission addresses a wide range of Astro2020 Decadal and NASA Science Mission Directorate Priority science areas, and is designed to explore astrophysical feedback across all mass scales. Arcus' three baseline science goals include: (i) Characterizing the drivers of accretion-powered feedback in supermassive black holes, (ii) Quantifying how feedback at all scales drives galaxy evolution and large-scale structure, including the tenuous cosmic web, and (iii) Analyzing stellar feedback from exoplanetary to galactic scales, including its effects on exoplanet environments targeted by current and future NASA missions. These science goals, along with a robust General Observer program, will be achieved using a mission that provides a high-sensitivity soft (10-60Å) X-ray spectrometer (XRS), working simultaneously with a co-aligned UV spectrometer (UVS; 970-1580Å). Arcus enables compelling baseline science and provides the broader astronomy community a revolutionary tool to characterize the full ionization range of warm and hot plasmas - including hydrogen, helium, and all abundant metals - Universe, from the halos of galaxies and clusters to the coronae of stars.
13093-82
Author(s): Ralph P. Kraft, Ctr. for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian (United States); Caroline A. Kilbourne, Simon R. Bandler, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Akos Bogdan, Ctr. for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian (United States); Jenna Cann, Renata S. Cumbee, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); William Dunn, Univ. College London (United Kingdom); Jeremy Drake, Lockheed Martin Space Systems Co. (United States); Megan E. Eckart, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States); Massimiliano Galeazzi, Univ. of Miami (United States); Amy Gall, Cecilia Garraffo, Ctr. for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian (United States); Edmund Hodges-Kluck, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Philip E. Kaaret, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Richard L. Kelley, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Ildar Khabibullin, Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik (Germany); Maurice A. Leutenegger, Maxim Markevitch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Francois Mernier, Anna Ogorzalek, Univ. of Maryland, College Park (United States); Daniel J. Patnaude, Ctr. for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian (United States); Ryan Pfeifle, Frederick S. Porter, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Paul P. Plucinsky, Ctr. for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian (United States); Markus Rau, The Univ. of Chicago (United States); James Steiner, Ctr. for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian (United States); Yuanyuan Su, Univ. of Kentucky (United States); Nhut Truong, Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States); Kimberly Weaver, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Irina Zhuravleva, The Univ. of Chicago (United States); John Zuhone, Ctr. for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian (United States)
20 June 2024 • 16:50 - 17:10 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The Line Emission Mapper (LEM) is a Probe mission concept developed in response to NASA’s APEX AO. LEM consists of one science instrument composed of a large area, wide-field X-ray optic and a microcalorimeter X-ray imaging spectrometer. LEM is optimized to observe low-surface brightness diffuse X-ray emission over a 30’x30’ field of view with 1.3-2.5 eV spectral resolution in the 0.2-2.0 keV band. Our primary science will be to map in emission the thermal, kinetic, and elemental properties of the diffuse gas in galaxies, the outskirts of galaxy clusters and the filamentary structures between these clusters, and in the Milky Way star formation regions and Galactic halo, and Galactic and Local Group supernova remnants. LEM will spend ~11% of its five-year prime science mission performing an All-Sky Survey – the first All-Sky X-ray survey at high spectral resolution. The remainder of the time will be divided between the directed science (30%) and competed General Observer science (70%). In this presentation, we will give a mission overview, the directed science that drives the mission design, and the broad scope that these capabilities offer the astrophysics community.
13093-83
Author(s): Christopher S. Reynolds, Univ. of Maryland, College Park (United States); Eric D. Miller, Erin A. Kara, MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research (United States); Richard F. Mushotzky, Univ. of Maryland, College Park (United States); Andrew Ptak, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Michael J. Koss, Eureka Scientific, Inc. (United States); Brian J. Williams, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Steven W. Allen, Stanford Univ. (United States); Franz E. Bauer, Pontificia Univ. Católica de Chile (Chile); Marshall W. Bautz, MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research (United States); Arash Bodaghee, Georgia College & State Univ. (United States); Kevin B. Burdge, MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research (United States); Nico Cappelluti, Univ. of Miami (United States); Brad Cenko, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); George Chartas, College of Charleston (United States); Kai-Wing Chan, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Lia Corrales, Univ. of Michigan (United States); Tansu Daylan, Washington Univ. in St. Louis (United States); Abraham D. Falcone, The Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States); Adi Foord, Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States); Catherine E. Grant, MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research (United States); Melanie Habouzit, Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie (Germany); Daryl Haggard, McGill Univ. (Canada); Sven C. Herrmann, Stanford Univ. (United States); Edmund Hodges-Kluck, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Oleg Kargaltsev, The George Washington Univ. (United States); George W. King, Univ. of Michigan (United States); Marina Kounkel, Univ. of North Florida (United States); Laura A. Lopez, The Ohio State Univ. (United States); Stefano Marchesi, Univ. degli Studi di Bologna (Italy); Michael McDonald, MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research (United States); Eileen Meyer, Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States); Melania Nynka, MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research (United States); Takashi Okajima, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Fabio Pacucci, Ctr. for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian (United States); Helen R. Russell, The Univ. of Nottingham (United Kingdom); Samar Safi-Harb, Univ. of Manitoba (Canada); Keivan G. Stassun, Vanderbilt Univ. (United States); Anna Trindade Falcão, Ctr. for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian (United States); Stephen A. Walker, The Univ. of Alabama in Huntsville (United States); Joern Wilms, Friedrich-Alexander-Univ. Erlangen-Nürnberg (Germany); Mihoko Yukita, William W. Zhang, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
20 June 2024 • 17:10 - 17:30 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The Advanced X-ray Imaging Satellite (AXIS) is a Probe-class concept that will build on the legacy of the Chandra X-ray Observatory by providing low-background, arcsecond-resolution imaging in the 0.3–10 keV band across a 450 square arcminute field of view, with an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity. AXIS utilizes breakthroughs in the construction of lightweight segmented X-ray optics using single-crystal silicon, and developments in the fabrication of large-format, small-pixel, high readout rate CCD detectors with good spectral resolution, allowing a robust and cost-effective design. Further, AXIS will be responsive to target-of-opportunity alerts and, with onboard transient detection, will be a powerful facility for studying the time-varying X-ray universe, following on from the legacy of the Neil Gehrels Swift X-ray observatory that revolutionized studies of the transient X-ray Universe. We present the current status of AXIS, highlighting the prime science objectives driving the AXIS concept and how the observatory design will achieve these objectives.
13093-84
Author(s): Cynthia S. Froning, Southwest Research Institute (United States)
20 June 2024 • 17:30 - 17:50 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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STROBE-X is a proposed Astrophysics Probe mission to conduct X-ray spectroscopy of time-variable targets and discovery of new sources. STROBE-X consists of three powerful instruments that provide an order of magnitude improvement in collecting area over previous capabilities for broad energy band, time domain spectroscopy, and a wide field monitor that scans 1/3 of the sky to discover new transients and enable rapid follow-up. STROBE-X will be the next generation high-energy cornerstone for time domain and multi-messenger astrophysics.
Session 18: Missions III
21 June 2024 • 08:30 - 09:50 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
Session Chair: Vadim Burwitz, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
13093-85
Author(s): Takahiro Minami, Shunsaku Nagasawa, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan), Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Japan); Yixian Zhang, Kristopher Cooper, Athanasios Pantazides, Lindsay Glesener, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities (United States); Hunter Kanniainen, Space Sciences Lab. (United States), Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States); Shin Watanabe, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan), Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Tadayuki Takahashi, Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Japan), The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)
21 June 2024 • 08:30 - 08:50 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) sounding rocket experiment enables high-resolution hard-X-ray solar observations with high sensitivity using the direct imaging method. The fourth flight, FOXSI-4, is scheduled to launch in spring 2024, aiming for the first-ever focusing imaging spectroscopic observation of a medium to large solar flare in hard X-rays. We developed wide-gap CdTe Double-sided Strip Detectors (CdTe-DSDs) for the hard X-ray focal plane detector, which achieved an energy resolution of ~1 keV (FWHM) and a high position resolution of ~ 30 µm with high detection efficiency. We also developed a new onboard data acquisition (DAQ) system with a Raspberry Pi, an FPGA board SPMU-001, and a SpaceWire interface for controlling all CdTe-DSDs and realizing fast readout of the observation data whose counting rate is estimated to be ~ 5000 counts per second. We give an overview of the hard X-ray telescope and the development of the DAQ system for the CdTe-DSDs.
13093-86
Author(s): Enrico Bozzo, Univ. de Genève (Switzerland)
21 June 2024 • 08:50 - 09:10 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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THESEUS is a mission concept proposed in response to the Euroepan Space Agency (ESA) call for medium-size mission (M7) within the Cosmic Vision Programme and currently undergoing a phase A study, competing with other two candidates for a launch opportunity in 2037. The mission is designed to vastly increase the discovery space of the high energy transient phenomena over the entirety of cosmic history. As such, THESEUS is planned to have large synergies with all major operating facilities in the 2030's. In this contribution, I will provide an overview of the mission payload, profile, and plans for the operations. The final selection among the 3 candidate missions within the ESA M7 call, leading to a single mission to be implemented for launch in 2037, is expected at the end of 2026.
13093-87
Author(s): Jessica A. Gaskin, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Mark McConnell, The Univ. of New Hampshire (United States); Randy Baggett, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Matthew Baring, Rice Univ. (United States); Peter Bloser, Los Alamos National Lab. (United States); Byron Bonds, Teledyne Brown Engineering, Inc. (United States); Dennis Bowler, Southwest Research Institute (United States); Michael S. Briggs, The Univ. of Alabama in Huntsville (United States); Camden D. Ertley, Southwest Research Institute (United States); Paul Galloway, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Adam Goldstein, Universities Space Research Association (United States); J. Eric Grove, U.S. Naval Research Lab. (United States); Dieter Hartmann, Clemson Univ. (United States); Peter Jenke, The Univ. of Alabama in Huntsville (United States); R. Marc Kippen, Los Alamos National Lab. (United States); Fabian Kislat, The Univ. of New Hampshire (United States); Daniel Kocevski, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Merlin Kole, Univ. de Genève (Switzerland); John Krizmanic, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Jason Legere, The Univ. of New Hampshire (United States); Tyson Littenberg, Neil Martin, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Sheila McBreen, Univ. College Dublin (Ireland); Chip Meegan, The Univ. of Alabama in Huntsville (United States); Karla Oñate Melecio, The Univ. of New Hampshire (United States); Mark Pearce, KTH Royal Institute of Technology (Sweden); John Polizotti, Southwest Research Institute (United States); Rob Preece, Universities Space Research Association (United States); Nicolas Produit, Univ. de Genève (Switzerland); James Ryan, The Univ. of New Hampshire (United States); Felix Ryde, KTH Royal Institute of Technology (Sweden); Lisa Smith, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Steven Sturner, Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States), NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Vincent Tatischeff, Univ. Paris-Saclay (France); Peter Veres, The Univ. of Alabama in Huntsville (United States); W. Thomas Vestrand, Los Alamos National Lab. (United States); Colleen Wilson-Hodge, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States); George Younes, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Jimmy Zaid, The Univ. of New Hampshire (United States); Bing Zhang, Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas (United States)
21 June 2024 • 09:10 - 09:30 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The LargE Area burst Polarimeter (LEAP) is a proposed Compton scattering polarimeter that will, for the first time, measure the level of polarization for a significant number of GRBs with sufficient sensitivity to determine the magnetic field structure, composition, energy dissipation mechanism of GRB jets, and determine the prompt emission mechanism of GRBs. Once approved, LEAP will be deployed as an external payload on the International Space Station (ISS) where it will measure GRB polarization over the energy range from 50–1000 keV, perform GRB spectroscopy from 20 keV to 6 MeV, and self-sufficiently determine the source direction. LEAP is uniquely suited to fill a critical gap in our knowledge regarding GRBs, by exposing the underlying physics that governs astrophysical jets and the extreme environment surrounding newborn compact objects.
13093-88
Author(s): Tatsuya Sawano, Daisuke Yonetoku, Takayuki Akahane, Makoto Arimoto, Daichi Eguchi, Takuma Hasegawa, Masashi Horita, Tomohiko Imachi, Yuki Imizu, Takashi Ito, Yoshiya Kasahara, Yuuki Kato, Ryuki Kawamoto, Naoki Kawasuji, Mariko Kimura, Ayaka Kiyoi, Yasuha Kojima, Daichi Kondo, Tomohisa Kurosu, Yasuhiro Shoji, Shoya Matsuda, Kanazawa Univ. (Japan); Tatehiro Mihara, RIKEN (Japan); Shunsuke Nakamura, Taro Nishide, Takeo Otaki, Valentin Pal'shin, Kaiji Takeuchi, Taiki Yamaguchi, Mitsuki Utoyama, Naoki Takahashi, Takuya Saito, Tsubasa Yoshida, Satoshi Yagitani, Kanazawa Univ. (Japan)
21 June 2024 • 09:30 - 09:50 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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KOYOH is a micro-satellite mission conducted by Kanazawa University. The objective is to explore the origin of the short gamma-ray burst progenitors by observing the X-ray transients associated with gravitational waves. It has two mission instruments. The one is wide field X-ray imager named T-LEX, and the other is gamma-ray burst monitor named KGD. The satellite will be launched in 2023. In this presentation, we summarize the scientific objectives, design and performance of the flight model mission instruments, and the initial in-flight status of the satellite.
Break
Coffee Break 09:50 - 10:10
Session 19: Missions IV
21 June 2024 • 10:10 - 11:30 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
Session Chair: Megan E. Eckart, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
13093-89
Author(s): Yuichiro Ezoe, Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan); Ryu Funase, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Harunori Nagata, Hokkaido Univ. (Japan); Yoshizumi Miyoshi, Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Hiroshi Nakajima, Kanto Gakuin Univ. (Japan); Ikuyuki Mitsuishi, Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Kumi Ishikawa, Masaki Numazawa, Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan); Yosuke Kawabata, Ryota Fuse, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Shintaro Nakajima, Ralf Boden, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Landon Kamps, Yuki Nobuhara, Shota Hirai, Letara Ltd. (Japan); Tomokage Yoneyama, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Kouichi Hagino, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Yosuke Matsumoto, Chiba Univ. (Japan); Keisuke Hosokawa, The Univ. of Electro-Communications (Japan); Satoshi Kasahara, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Daiki Ishi, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Junko S. Hiraga, Kwansei Gakuin Univ. (Japan); Kazuhisa Mitsuda, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (Japan); Masaki Fujimoto, Munetaka Ueno, Atsushi Yamazaki, Hiroshi Hasegawa, Takefumi Mitani, Yasuhiro Kawakatsu, Takahiro Iwata, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Hiroyuki Koizumi, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Hironori Sahara, Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan); Yoshiaki Kanamori, Tohoku Univ. (Japan); Kohei Morishita, Kyushu Univ. (Japan)
21 June 2024 • 10:10 - 10:30 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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GEO-X (GEOspace X-ray imager) is a small satellite mission to visualize the Earth’s magnetosphere through Solar Wind Charge eXchange (SWCX). SWCX is known as soft X-ray emissions generated by the charge exchange between highly charged-state heavy ions and neutral atoms in the Earth’s exosphere. The GEO-X satellite is aimed to be launched during the upcoming solar maximum and is planned to be injected to a low-latitude orbit which allows visualization of the magnetosphere from outside the magnetosphere. The satellite will carry a light-weight X-ray imaging spectrometer, dramatically improving the size and weight of those onboard past X-ray astronomy satellites.
13093-90
Author(s): Ava Myers, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
21 June 2024 • 10:30 - 10:50 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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BurstCube is a 6U (10 x 20 x 30 cm) CubeSat designed to detect gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and enable multi-messenger observations, scheduled to launch in early 2024. BurstCube science is informed by the coincident detection of GRB 170817A and gravitational wave (GW) 170817, which confirmed compact binary mergers as progenitors for GRBs. Future coincident detections will also provide important context to the GW measurements - namely constraining the neutron star equation of state and testing fundamental physics, while also probing the origin of GRB prompt emission. Full sky coverage in the gamma-ray regime is needed to increase the likelihood of such measurements. Once in orbit, BurstCube will expand sky coverage while rapidly providing public alerts and localization information to the community using the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) and General Coordinates Network (GCN). This work will describe the current status of the mission, as well as an outline of post-launch operations, performance, and science goals.
13093-274
Author(s): Kumiko K. Nobukawa, Kindai Univ. (Japan); Ayaki Takeda, Univ. of Miyazaki (Japan); Satoru Katsuda, Saitama Univ. (Japan); Takeshi Go Tsuru, Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Kazuhiro Nakazawa, Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Koji Mori, Univ. of Miyazaki (Japan); Hiroyuki Uchida, Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Masayoshi Nobukawa, Nara Univ. of Education (Japan); Koyo Ogata, Eisuke Kurogi, Univ. of Miyazaki (Japan); Takumi Kishimoto, Yoshihisa Kawabe, Satoru Kuwano, Reo Matsui, Kindai Univ. (Japan); Mizuki Uenomachi, Masamune Matsuda, Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Takaya Yamawaki, Saitama Univ. (Japan)
21 June 2024 • 10:50 - 11:10 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The upper atmosphere at an altitude of around 100 km has the least observational data of all atmospheres due to the difficulties of in-situ observations. Aiming to observe the density of the upper atmosphere, we are developing an X-ray camera dedicated to atmospheric observations to install on the exposed area of the International Space Station (ISS). With the X-ray camera, we will observe the cosmic X-ray background (CXB) transmitted through the Earth rim, measure the absorption column density via spectroscopy, and thus obtain the density of the upper atmosphere. The X-ray camera is composed of a slit collimator and an X-ray SOI-CMOS pixel sensor, and will stand on its own and make observations, controlled by a CPU-embedded FPGA "Zynq". We plan to install the camera on the ISS in 2025, when the sun will be at its maximum. In this presentation, the outline of the project and the development status will be reported.
13093-92
Author(s): Kazuhiro Nakazawa, Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Hiroki Akamatsu, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, KEK (Japan); Teruaki Enoto, Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Manabu Ishida, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Wataru B. Iwakiri, Chiba Univ. (Japan); Hironori Matsumoto, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Koji Mori, Univ. of Miyazaki (Japan); Hiroshi Nakajima, Kanto Gakuin Univ. (Japan); Masayoshi Nobukawa, Nara Univ. of Education (Japan); Hirofumi Noda, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Megumi Shidatsu, Ehime Univ. (Japan); Hiromitsu Takahashi, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Takaaki Tanaka, Konan Univ. (Japan); Hiroyuki Uchida, Yoshihiro Ueda, Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Shin Watanabe, Hiroya Yamaguchi, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan)
21 June 2024 • 11:10 - 11:30 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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JEDI is a Japanese lead X-ray mission proposal aiming at an hour-level follow up TOO observations with 0.3-79 keV wide X-ray band-width with imaging spectroscopy capability. The mission has a good hard-X-ray effective area combined with low instrumental background, and a good soft-X-ray wide-FOV survey capability. Aiming at a launch in mid 2030s, the mission is designed to provide wide-band spectroscopy of time-dependent high-energy phenomena. The low background and large effective area in the hard X-ray band also make it good at observing diffuse hard X-ray emissions, on which the existing hard X-ray observatories faced some limitations. The 1-degree soft-X-ray FOV will provide survey capability and can be used for monitoring star-clusters and near-by galaxies with optional on-the-fly step maneuver capability to locate flaring targets into the narrower FOV of hard X-ray imager. UV coverage and polarimetry options are also considered.
Session 20: Gamma and Polarimetry I
21 June 2024 • 11:30 - 12:20 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
13093-93
Author(s): Paolo Soffitta, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Luca Baldini, Univ. di Pisa (Italy), Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Wayne H. Baumgartner, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Ronaldo Bellazzini, Univ. di Pisa (Italy), Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Stephen D. Bongiorno, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Niccolò Bucciantini, INAF - Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri (Italy); Enrico Costa, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Michal Dovciak, Astronomical Institute of the CAS, v.v.i. (Czech Republic); Steven R. Ehlert, Philip E. Kaaret, Jeffery J. Kolodziejczak, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Luca Latronico, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Frédéric Marin, Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, Univ. de Strasbourg (France); Alan P. Marscher, Boston Univ. (United States); Herman L. Marshall, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); Giorgio Matt, Univ. degli Studi di Roma Tre (Italy); Fabio Muleri, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Stephen L. O'Dell, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Juri Poutanen, Univ. of Turku (Finland); Brian Ramsey, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Roger W. Romani, Stanford Univ. (United States); Patrick Slane, Ctr. for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian (United States); Allyn Tennant, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Roberto Turolla, Univ. degli Studi di Padova (Italy); Martin C. Weisskopf, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
21 June 2024 • 11:30 - 12:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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IXPE, the first observatory dedicated to imaging X-ray polarimetry, was launched on Dec 9, 2021 and is operating successfully. A partnership between NASA and the Italian Space Agencey (ASI) IXPE features three X-ray telescopes each comprised of a mirror module assembly with a polarization sensitive detector at its focus. An extending boom was deployed on orbit to provide the necessary 4 m focal length. A 3-axis-stabilized spacecraft provides power, attitude determination and control, and commanding. After 2.5 years of observation IXPE has measured statistically-significant polarization from almost all the classes of celestial sources that emit X-rays. In the following we describe the IXPE in-orbit status as derived by the observation of celestial sources and from the use of the on-board calibration systems reporting on its performance after 2.5 years of operations. We show, also, the main astrophysical results which are outstanding for a SMEX mission.
13093-94
Author(s): Regina Caputo, Carolyn Kierans, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Nicholas Cannady, Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States), NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States), The Ctr. for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology (United States); Abraham D. Falcone, The Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States); Yasushi Fukazawa, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Manoj Jadhav, Argonne National Lab. (United States); Matthew Kerr, U.S. Naval Research Lab. (United States); Nicholas Kirschner, The George Washington Univ. (United States); Kavic Kumar, Univ. of Maryland, College Park (United States), NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States), The Ctr. for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology (United States); Adrien Laviron, Univ. Paris–Saclay (France); Richard Leys, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (Germany); Julie McEnery, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Jessica Metcalfe, Argonne National Lab. (United States); Zachary Metzler, Univ. of Maryland, College Park (United States), The Ctr. for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology (United States); Nathan Miller, Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States); John Mitchell, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Lucas Parker, Los Alamos National Lab. (United States); Ivan Peric, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (Germany); Jeremy Perkins, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Bernard Phlips, U.S. Naval Research Lab. (United States); Judith Racusin, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Makoto Sasaki, Univ. of Maryland, College Park (United States), NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States), The Ctr. for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology (United States); Daniel Shy, U.S. Naval Research Lab. (United States); Amanda L. Steinhebel, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Nicolas Striebig, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (Germany); Yusuke Suda, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Hiroyasu Tajima, Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Janeth Valverde, Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States), NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States), The Ctr. for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology (United States); Daniel P. Violette, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Richard Woolf, U.S. Naval Research Lab. (United States); Andreas Zoglauer, Space Sciences Lab. (United States), Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)
21 June 2024 • 12:00 - 12:20 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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Many questions posed in the Astro2020 Decadal survey in both the New Messengers and New Physics and the Cosmic Ecosystems science themes require a gamma-ray mission with capabilities exceeding those of existing (e.g. Fermi, Swift) and planned (e.g. COSI) observatories. ComPair, the Compton Pair telescope, is a prototype of such a next-generation gamma-ray mission. It successfully launched from Ft. Sumner, New Mexico in August 2023. To continue the goals of the ComPair project to develop technologies that will enable a future gamma-ray mission, the next generation of ComPair (ComPair 2) will be upgraded to increase the sensitivity and low-energy transient capabilities of the instrument. These advancements are enabled by AstroPix, a Silicon monolithic active pixel sensor, in the tracker and custom silicon photomultipliers and front-end electronics in the calorimeter. This effort builds on design work for the All-sky Medium Energy Gamma-ray Observatory eXplorer (AMEGO-X) concept that was submitted the 2021 MIDEX Announcement of Opportunity. The team will build a prototype tower and test the integrated system with laboratory sources and in a gamma-ray beam.
Break
Lunch Break 12:20 - 13:40
Session 21: Gamma and Polarimetry II
21 June 2024 • 13:40 - 15:40 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
13093-95
Author(s): Sergio Fabiani, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy)
21 June 2024 • 13:40 - 14:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The CUbesat Solar Polarimeter (CUSP) is a CubeSat mission to measure the linear polarization of solar flares in the hard X-rays band by means of a Compton scattering polarimeter. CUSP is a project in the framework of the Alcor Program of the Italian Space Agency aimed to develop new CubeSat missions. CUSP is approved for a Phase B study that will last for 12 month starting from the beginning of 2024. We report on the current status of the CUSP mission design, mission analysis and payload scientific performance.
13093-96
Author(s): Hirokazu Odaka, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Kazutaka Aoyama, Waseda Univ. (Japan); Shota Arai, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Shintaro Arai, Waseda Univ. (Japan); Tsuguo Aramaki, Northeastern Univ. (United States); Jonathan Asaadi, The Univ. of Texas at Arlington (United States); Aya Bamba, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); John Barry, Northeastern Univ. (United States); Manel Errando, Washington Univ. in St. Louis (United States); Lorenzo Fabris, Oak Ridge National Lab. (United States); Tatsuki Fujiwara, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Yasushi Fukazawa, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Kouichi Hagino, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Tomohiro Hakamata, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Utano Hijikata, Waseda Univ. (Japan); Nagisa Hiroshima, Univ. of Toyama (Japan); Masahiro Ichihashi, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Yuto Ichinohe, RIKEN (Japan); Yoshiyuki Inoue, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Koki Ishikawa, Waseda Univ. (Japan); Kota Ishiwata, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Toshiya Iwata, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Georgia Karagiorgi, Columbia Univ. (United States); Tatsuaki Kato, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Hodaka Kawamura, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Dmitry Khangulyan, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan); Jon Leyva, Emma Malabanan, Northeastern Univ. (United States); Akshay Malige, Columbia Univ. (United States); John Mitchell, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Reshmi Mukherjee, Barnard College (United States); Riki Nakajima, Waseda Univ. (Japan); Kazuhiro Nakazawa, Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Nga Nguyen, Northeastern Univ. (United States); Keigo Okuma, Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Kerstin Perez, Columbia Univ. (United States); Nabin Poudyal, Melissa Rivera, Northeastern Univ. (United States); Ibrahim Safa, William Seligman, Columbia Univ. (United States); Ruo-Yu Shang, Barnard College (United States); Mihir Shetty, Columbia Univ. (United States); Tiga Shimizu, Waseda Univ. (Japan); Kentaro Shirahama, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Takuya Shiraishi, Kanagawa Univ. (Japan); Sonya Smith, Howard Univ. (United States); Yusuke Suda, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Arathi Suraj, Northeastern Univ. (United States); Hiromitsu Takahashi, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Satoshi Takashima, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Tsubasa Tamba, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Masashi Tanaka, Waseda Univ. (Japan); Svanik Tandon, Columbia Univ. (United States); Hinako Taniguchi, Waseda Univ. (Japan); Ryutaro Tatsumi, Osaka Univ. (Japan); John Tomsick, Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States); Naomi Tsuji, Kanagawa Univ. (Japan); Yuusuke Uchida, Tokyo Univ. of Science (Japan); Yorinobu Utsumi, Waseda Univ. (Japan); Shin Watanabe, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Timothy Wessling-Resnick, Northeastern Univ. (United States); Yutaro Yano, Waseda Univ. (Japan); Kazushi Yawata, National Defense Medical College (Japan); Hiroki Yoneda, Julius-Maximilians-Univ. Würzburg (Germany); Kohei Yorita, Waseda Univ. (Japan); Marina Yoshimoto, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Jiancheng Zeng, Northeastern Univ. (United States)
21 June 2024 • 14:00 - 14:20 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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GRAMS (Gamma-Ray and AntiMatter Survey) is a next-generation proposed balloon-borne/satellite-based mission aimed at high sensitivity MeV gamma-ray astrophysical observations and background-free indirect dark matter search via hadronic antiparticles. The main detector of GRAMS is a meter-scale liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC). The adoption of liquid argon as detector material allows us to produce an unprecedentedly large effective area instrument both for cosmic MeV gamma rays of 0.5-20 MeV and antiparticles of dark matter origin. This large effective area, which will exceed 1000 cm2, is necessary for measuring faint gamma-ray signals of nuclear line emissions from energetic phenomena such as supernovae as well as for observing short-duration transient objects including gamma-ray bursts with high photon statistics. In this talk, we present the mission concept and design, the current proof-of-concept studies using prototype LArTPCs, and an engineering balloon flight conducted in 2023.
13093-97
Author(s): Hannah Gulick, Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States); John Tomsick, Juan-Carlos Martinez Oliveros, Space Sciences Lab., Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States); Claire Chen, Hubert Liu, Derek Shah, Shreya Nandyala, Kaylie Ching, Tomas Mician, Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States); Alyson Joens, Space Sciences Lab., Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States); Eliza Neights, The George Washington Univ. (United States); Carolyn Kierans, Israel Martinez, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Tadayuki Takahashi, Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Kazuhiro Nakazawa, Kobayashi-Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe, Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Samer Al Nussirat, Andreas Zoglauer, Space Sciences Lab., Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)
21 June 2024 • 14:20 - 14:40 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The Compton Spectrometer and Imager (COSI) is a NASA funded Small Explorer (SMEX) mission slated to launch in 2027. COSI will house a wide-field gamma-ray telescope designed to survey the entire sky in the 0.2-5 MeV range, providing imaging, spectroscopy, and polarimetry of astrophysical sources. In addition to the main instrument, COSI will fly with a Student Collaboration Project known as the Background and Transient Observer (BTO). BTO will extend the COSI science to lower energies by providing spectral information in the 30 keV–2 MeV range. Using spectral information from both the COSI and BTO instruments, physics such as the energy peak turnover in gamma-ray bursts, the properties of soft gamma-ray repeaters, and the rates of transient phenomena will be constrained. In this talk, we present on the shared science returnables from the COSI and BTO missions. This will include an overview of the instrument and survey designs, simulations of several transient phenomena as observed with both COSI and BTO, and a final analysis of the event rates expected in the BTO instrument.
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Author(s): Kazuo Tanaka, Jun Kataoka, Ryoji Iwashita, Ryohei Mori, Tomoya Suga, Shojun Ogasawara, Moeri Tao, Waseda Univ. (Japan); Yoichi Yatsu, Chujo Toshihiro, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Shinichiro Takeda, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan), iMAGINE-X Inc. (Japan); Mitsunobu Onishi, iMAGINE-X Inc. (Japan)
21 June 2024 • 14:40 - 15:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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INSPIRE is the world's first satellite in the 50kg-class designed for MeV gamma-ray astronomy. Despite the limited observations in the MeV gamma-ray band since the launch of the COMPTEL satellite in 1991, this energy range is crucial for the study of nuclear gamma-rays, which play a significant role in nucleosynthesis processes. INSPIRE is equipped with a hybrid Compton-camera system that can simultaneously achieve X-ray and gamma-ray imaging by combining features of Compton and pinhole cameras in a single detector system. It consists of two sensor layers of large-area Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays optically coupled with 3D position-sensitive GAGG scintillators. The sensitivity is estimated to surpass that of COMPTEL by one month of measurements. The structural design of INSPIRE is based on the university satellite HIBARI, launched in 2021, and PETREL, currently in preparation for launch. The launch is scheduled for 2026. The Engineering Model has been fabricated, and performance test in progress. In this presentation, I will introduce the design and the progress of these performance tests.
13093-99
Author(s): Atsushi Takada, Tomonori Ikeda, Mitsuru Abe, Hirotake Tsukamoto, Ryo Yoshioka, Toru Tanimori, Taito Takemura, Kei Yoshikawa, Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Yoshitaka Mizumura, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Shunsuke Kurosawa, Tohoku Univ. (Japan); Kentaro Miuchi, Kobe Univ. (Japan); Tatsuya Sawano, Kanazawa Univ. (Japan); Takeshi Nakamori, Haruki Iiyama, Yamagata Univ. (Japan); Tomohiko Oka, Masaki Mori, Ritsumeikan Univ. (Japan); Kenji Hamaguchi, Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States); Junko Kushida, Tokai Univ. (Japan)
21 June 2024 • 15:00 - 15:20 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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In the MeV band, we can obtain the unique information about nucleosynthesis, diffusion in our galaxy, low-energy cosmic rays, particle acceleration, and so on. However, the detection sensitivity in this band has a large gap compared to that in the other bands due to a huge background contamination. For the future observations, we are developing an electron-tracking Compton camera (ETCC) with the powerful background rejection tools based on the Compton recoil electron tracks. This ETCC has been demonstrated in the last two balloon experiments, and we are now preparing for the next balloon flight SMILE-3 to observe galactic diffuse gamma rays and some bright celestial objects. In this talk, we will talk about the scientific motivation and the preparation of ETCC for SMILE-3.
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Author(s): Karla Oñate Melecio, The Univ. of New Hampshire (United States); Mark McConnell, The Univ. of New Hampshire (United States), Southwest Research Institute (United States); Jason Legere, James Bundock, The Univ. of New Hampshire (United States); Camden D. Ertley, Southwest Research Institute (United States); Fabian Kislat, Emily Mello, The Univ. of New Hampshire (United States); Kevin Mello, Southwest Research Institute (United States); Dominic Puopolo, Jimmy Zaid, The Univ. of New Hampshire (United States)
21 June 2024 • 15:20 - 15:40 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F
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The Gamma-Ray Polarimeter Experiment (GRAPE) is a high-altitude balloon experiment designed for polarization studies of transient sources with a long-term goal of observing Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) aboard a series of Long Duration Balloon flights (LDBs). Polarization studies of GRB prompt emission is necessary to constrain existing physics models describing the radiation processes and magnetic field structures of astrophysical jets. GRAPE is a wide field of view (FoV) Compton polarimeter measuring γ-ray polarization in the 50-500 keV energy range with a broad range (20 keV – 3 MeV) for spectroscopy. The novel 3-dimensional geometry of the current design provides GRAPE with Compton imaging in addition to polarization capabilities. The instrument consists of 245 optically isolated SiPM coupled to either high-Z (GAGG:Ce) or low-Z (para-Terphenyl) scintillator arranged in a 7x7x5 cuboid structure. At the center of the scintillator array two low-Z detectors contain a ~25 nCi Co-60 calibration source for onboard calibrations. A test flight of this design was flown on August 27, 2023, from Fort Sumner, NM to validate the scientific capability of the instrument design. We will report on res
Session PS1: Posters - UV
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
13093-101
Author(s): Nicole Melso, Aafaque R. Khan, Hannah Tanquary, Elijah Garcia, Daniel Truong, Naomi Yescas, Sooseong Park, Sumedha Uppnor, Carlos J. Vargas, Haeun Chung, Tom McMahon, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Keri Hoadley, The Univ. of Iowa (United States); Erika T. Hamden, Jason B. Corliss, The Univ. of Arizona (United States)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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Aspera is a NASA Pioneers Mission designed to measure faint OVI emission around nearby galaxies with unprecedented sensitivity. The SmallSat payload consists of two identical co-aligned spectrographs, both operating in the Far Ultraviolet (FUV) between 1030 -1040 Angstrom. Missions operating at FUV wavelengths are particularly sensitive to contamination, as short wavelengths are easily scattered and absorbed by contaminants deposited on payload optical surfaces. A strict contamination control plan is critical to avoiding a severe loss in FUV throughput. Aspera contamination control efforts have been tailored to fit within the scope of a sub-Class D mission, a challenge that has become increasingly relevant as advances in FUV optics/detectors drive an uptick in smaller platform, contamination sensitive UV payloads. Contamination monitoring is used to audit the cleanroom environment, avoid outgassing contaminants under vacuum, and assess contaminant levels on payload optics. We will present contamination monitoring measurements made throughout the payload build and discuss protocols implemented for minimizing contamination-related performance degradation.
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Author(s): Simran Agarwal, Aafaque R. Khan, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Haeun Chung, Erika T. Hamden, Fernando Coronado, Carlos J. Vargas, Steward Observatory (United States)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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Aspera is a NASA Astrophysics Pioneers SmallSat project, designed to study galaxy evolution by detecting warm-hot coronal galaxy halos through spectroscopic OVI emission observation at 1032 Å. Using two Rowland-Circle spectrographs with off-axis parabolas and toroidal gratings sharing a Micro Channel Plate detector, the mission faces the challenge of achieving a low instrument scattered light background. This paper details a comprehensive analysis of straylight in the instrument, presenting a two-staged baffle design to minimize background. The first stage optimizes vane geometry using a first-order algorithm, preventing out-of-field straylight from reaching the detector. The second stage strategically places a shared baffle structure to block unwanted light. Coated with Acktar Magic Black, the baffles successfully meet stray light suppression requirements in simulation studies, demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed design. This work provides valuable insights for optimizing instrument design in missions with stringent background requirements.
13093-103
Author(s): Nicole Melso, Aafaque R. Khan, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Keri Hoadley, The Univ. of Iowa (United States); Oswald H. W. Siegmund, Adrian Martin, Sensor Sciences, LLC (United States); Dave Hamara, Naomi Yescas, Hannah Tanquary, Carlos J. Vargas, Haeun Chung, Tom McMahon, Erika T. Hamden, The Univ. of Arizona (United States)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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Aspera is a NASA Pioneers Mission designed to reach ultra-low surface brightness limits in the Far Ultraviolet (FUV). The SmallSat payload consists of two identical spectrograph channels, both sharing a single detector and operating between 1030 -1040 Angstrom. The FUV sensitivity of this mission hinges on the availability of high QE, low background, photon-counting detectors. Aspera uses a microchannel plate detector (MCP) designed and manufactured by Sensor Sciences. The detector is a small format, flat MCP stack with a CsI photocathode. A custom cross-delay line anode has been designed to optimize the resolution in two separate active areas on the detector, one from each spectrograph channel. We present characterization and testing performed at the University of Arizona with the Aspera flight electronics following the delivery of the flight model detectors.
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Author(s): Greyson Davis, Keri Hoadley, Jared A. Termini, Fernando Cruz Aguirre, The Univ. of Iowa (United States); Philippe Balard, Lab. d'Astrophysique de Marseille (France); Nicolas Bray, Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales (France); Ignacio Cevallos-Aleman, Columbia Univ. (United States); Erika T. Hamden, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Gillian Kyne, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Zeren Lin, D. Christopher Martin, Drew M. Miles, Caltech (United States); Bruno Millard, Lab. d'Astrophysique de Marseille (France); Shouleh Nikzad, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Vincent Picouet, Caltech (United States); David Schiminovich, Meghna Sitaram, Columbia Univ. (United States); David Valls-Gabaud, Observatoire de Paris (France)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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The balloon-borne UV telescope Faint Intergalactic Red-shifted Emission Balloon (FIREBall-2) was launched from Fort Sumner, NM on September 25, 2023, for its second attempted flight. The flight was unexpectedly terminated at ~10 hours due to a mechanical issue, and very little science data was obtained; however, this short flight provided an excellent opportunity to test the in-flight communications system. Testing the communication system pre-flight was challenging, and an accurate sense of signal reception and communication errors expected during flight could not be obtained. From launch to descent, very few data packets were dropped or corrupted. Had the flight continued for the expected duration, the success up to early termination gives confidence that the communications systems would have continued to meet our expectations. While this test was highly successful, some areas for improvement were identified and will be addressed before FIREBall-2’s next flight.
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Author(s): Zeren Lin, Caltech (United States); Gillian Kyne, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Vincent Picouet, Caltech (United States); Aafaque R. Khan, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Drew M. Miles, Chris Martin, Caltech (United States); Erika T. Hamden, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Keri Hoadley, The Univ. of Iowa (United States); Bruno Milliard, Lab. d’Astrophysique de Marseille (France); Shouleh Nikzad, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); David Schiminovich, Columbia Univ. (United States); David Valls-Gabaud, Observatoire de Paris (France)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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The Faint Intergalactic Medium Redshifted Emission Balloon (FIREBall-2) is a UV multi-object spectrograph exploring the CGM of galaxies at low redshifts (0.3 < z < 1.0). The science detector is a large-format 2k x 1k electron multiplying (EM) CCD, optimized for FIREBall-2’s bandpass in the UV. The technology involved in UV photon-counting CCDs is slated for use on next-generation Great Observatories, like Habitable Worlds Observatory and the Roman Space Telescope. FIREBall-2 plays a critical role in increasing the TRL of these next-generation UV detectors; this will provide feedback for future proposals that require space-qualified detectors. We will present an overview of the FIREBall-2 detector system, discuss the motivations for the upgrades since the 2018 campaign, the progress made on implementing them, and the ground performance including read noise, conversion gain, dark current, CIC, CTE, and EM gain of the final system for the FIREBall-2 launch in September 2023 in Fort Sumner, NM.
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Author(s): Ignacio Cevallos-Aleman, David Schiminovich, Meghna Sitaram, Columbia Univ. (United States); Charles-Antoine Chevrier, Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales (France); Zeren Lin, Caltech (United States); Johan Montel, Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales (France); Drew M. Miles, Vincent Picouet, Caltech (United States); Matthew Werneken, Columbia Univ. (United States)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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FIREBall-2 is a Balloon-Borne UV telescope designed to observe faint UV emission from the circumgalactic medium around low redshift galaxies (z ~ 0.3 - 1.0). FIREBall-2 employs a 1m telescope with a multi-object spectrograph, custom-designed slit-masks and a delta-doped EMCCD detector. FIREBall-2 achieves steady 1-2” pointing with a CNES-provided coarse guidance system complemented by a fine guidance system which provides real time, on-sky feedback with an sCMOS camera embedded within the spectrograph enclosure. The guider system provides a live video stream, computes translational and rotational offsets and sends high rate (30 Hz) gondola pointing error corrections, while also handling slit mask selection and in-flight optimization of the image focus and PSF. We review the current state of the system after testing and use during FIREBall-2’s 2018 and 2023 campaigns and discuss its performance, challenges and development of its hardware and software functions ahead of its next flight campaign.
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Author(s): Simran Agarwal, Aafaque R. Khan, Haeun Chung, Erika T. Hamden, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); David Schiminovich, Columbia Univ. (United States); Bruno Milliard, Lab. d'Astrophysique de Marseille (France)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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The Faint Intergalactic-medium Red-shifted Emission Balloon (FIREBall-2) is a joint NASA/CNES-funded balloon-borne UV telescope to map faint UV emission from the circumgalactic medium around low redshift galaxies. The initial September 2018 flight encountered challenges, including a balloon breach and subsequent damage during landing, impacting the two large telescope mirrors and the critical focal corrector. Likely due to landing shock, the focal corrector experienced misalignment beyond tolerance, necessitating re-evaluation and realignment. This paper outlines a comprehensive approach to realigning the focal corrector using a computer-generated hologram (CGH) and a Zygo interferometer for feedback. The CGH enables precise alignment corrections in various degrees of freedom, while interferometer feedback aids in reducing aberrations. The paper details the methodology for optical alignment, surface measurement, and performance evaluation of the focal corrector, emphasizing its successful integration into the FB-2 spectrograph in early 2023 for the upcoming September 2023 flight.
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Author(s): Jessica S. Li, Jason B. Corliss, Haeun Chung, Aafaque R. Khan, Simran Agarwal, Carlos J. Vargas, Erika T. Hamden, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Ramona Augustin, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States); Peter Behroozi, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Joe Burchett, New Mexico State Univ. (United States); Heejoo Choi, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Lauren Corlies, Adler Planetarium & Astronomy Museum (United States); Greyson Davis, The Univ. of Iowa (United States); Ewan Douglas, Carl Hergenrother, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Keri Hoadley, The Univ. of Iowa (United States); Chris Howk, Univ. of Notre Dame (United States); Miriam Keppler, Daewook Kim, Nicole Melso, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); David Schiminovich, Columbia Univ. (United States); Dennis Zaritsky, Fernando Coronado, Elijah Garcia, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Giulia Ghidoli, Ascending Node Technologies, LLC (United States); Alfred Goodwin, Dave Hamara, Walter M. Harris, Karl Harshman, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); John Kidd, Ascending Node Technologies, LLC (United States); Tom McMahon, Jamison Noenickx, Gabe Noriega, Ryan Pecha, Cork Sauve, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Sanford Selznick, Ascending Node Technologies, LLC (United States); Hannah Tanquary, Daniel Truong, Sumedha Uppnor, Bill Verts, Ellie Wolcott, Naomi Yescas, The Univ. of Arizona (United States)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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Aspera is a NASA Pioneers SmallSat mission designed to detect and map the O VI emission (103.2 nm) through long-slit spectroscopy in the halos of nearby galaxies for the first time. The spectrograph utilizes toroidal gratings with multilayer coatings of aluminum, lithium fluoride, and magnesium fluoride that optimize their throughput in the extreme ultraviolet EUV waveband of 103 to 104 nm. We discuss the grating verification test setup design, including optical alignment and reference measurement setup. We also present the result of grating efficiency simulation using the target grating groove profile and the multi-layer coatings.
13093-109
Author(s): Kazuo Yoshioka, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Yudai Suzuki, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Masaki Kuwabara, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan); Go Murakami, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Ashita Yamazaki, Tatsuki Matsumoto, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Makoto Taguchi, Shingo Kameda, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan); Ichiro Yoshikawa, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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A small UV imager, named HI (Hydrogen Imager), is currently under development to observe the hydrogen coma of a long-period comet. The instrument will be on board one of the probes for the ESA's Comet Interceptor mission, scheduled for launch in 2029. The optical design and detector of HI are optimized for observing hydrogen Lyman-alpha (wavelength 121.6nm) with dimensions smaller than 10cm x 10cm x 25cm and power consumption less than 9W. This presentation will provide an overview of the current development status, focusing on the activities related to the engineering model (EM).
13093-110
Author(s): David J. Sahnow, Christian Johnson, Darshan Kakkad, Marc Rafelski, Svea Hernandez, William Fischer, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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In anticipation of a move to a seventh Lifetime Position on the FUV channel of the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) in 2025, we have conducted exploratory work to model the instrument performance over the full range of possible positions for the spectra on the detector. This effort includes (1) optical modeling of the spectrograph; (2) creating simulated science spectra and evaluating the resolving power and other spectral properties at a range of positions; (3) evaluating the detector properties at potential lifetime positions while considering mechanical limitations of the hardware; and (4) reserving sufficient space for later Lifetime Positions. We have used this information to formulate preliminary plans for moving to the next position, which includes identifying which observing modes should be adjusted, and providing our initial thoughts on future Lifetime Positions.
13093-111
Author(s): Binukumar G. Nair, Bharat P. Chandra, Margarita Safonova, Indian Institute of Astrophysics (India); Sabiha Sultana, Yadhukrishnan SV, Nawaz N., Ctr. for Nano Science and Engineering (CeNSE) (India), Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru (India); Shubham Ghatul, Shubhangi Jain, Mahesh Babu, Rekhesh Mohan, Jayant Murthy, Indian Institute of Astrophysics (India)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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The field of ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy has long been instrumental in unravelling the mysteries of our universe, shedding light on the fundamental processes governing celestial objects and terrestrial phenomena. In this context, the development of advanced spectrographic instruments is pivotal to enhancing our understanding of these spectral signatures. Recent years have witnessed significant progress in UV spectroscopy, driven by advancements in technology and materials science. One crucial element of UV spectrography is the optical slit, which plays a pivotal role in determining the spectral resolution and overall performance of a spectrograph. Traditional fabrication methods for optical slits often face limitations in precision, throughput, and reproducibility.
13093-112
Author(s): Sagi Ben-Ami, Yossi Shvartzvald, Eli Waxman, Avishay Gal-Yam, Eran O. Ofek, Weizmann Institute of Science (Israel); Viktor M. Algranatti, Israel Space Agency (Israel); Merlin Barschke, David Berge, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (Germany); Marek Kowalski, Humboldt-Univ. zu Berlin (Germany); Ofer Lapid, Udi Netzer, Yoram Yaniv, Weizmann Institute of Science (Israel)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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ULTRASAT is a spaceborne near UV telescope with an unprecedentedly large field of view (200 squared degrees) and UV sensitivity. The mission, led by the Weizmann Institute of Science and the Israel space agency in collaboration with DESY (Helmholtz foundation, Germany) and NASA (USA), is expected to be launched to a geostationary orbit in late 2026. The mission payload is currently going through assembly, integration and testing, with all critical elements manufactured and tested. In the following talk I will describe in detail the various challenges encountered, those we expect to encounter during operation, and our mitigation plan. I will emphasize topics such as cleanliness and contamination, optics qualification and stray light testing. Finally, I will present the expected performance based on as-built data.
13093-113
Author(s): Grace M. Halferty, Dmitry Vorobiev, Brian T. Fleming, William Snyder, Dana Chafetz, Jack Williams, Lab. for Atmospheric and Space Physics (United States)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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We present the progress of the design of the Spectroscopic Ultraviolet Multi-object Observatory (SUMO) Prototype and its current development, building, and testing. The SUMO Prototype is part of the technology maturation program of SUMO, a mission concept designed for small and medium-sized satellite platforms, and will be the first time a DMD-based instrument is deployed in space. Because the SUMO Prototype will be deployed as a secondary payload, the spectrograph is designed for completely autonomous operation in the near-ultraviolet (NUV) regime. The SUMO Prototype consists of an 8 cm Cassegrain telescope and a digital micromirror device (DMD)-based multi-object spectrometer (MOS), with parallel imaging and spectroscopic channels. As part of this work, we also developed a custom DMD controller, which is suitable for operation in the space environment. This controller works with a custom-developed object selection code, which performs multi-object spectroscopy in real-time. The SUMO Prototype is tentatively scheduled for flight in 2025 aboard the INFUSE sounding rocket.
13093-114
Author(s): Donal O'Sullivan, Brian T. Fleming, Briana L. Indahl, Dmitry Vorobiev, Maitland Bowen, Lab. for Atmospheric and Space Physics, Univ. of Colorado Boulder (United States); Sreejith Aickara Gopinathan, Institut für Weltraumforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften (Austria); Dana Chafetz, Jack Williams, Diane Brening, Adriana Diaz, Kevin C. France, Michael J. Kaiser, Alex Sico, Stefan Ulrich, Lab. for Atmospheric and Space Physics, Univ. of Colorado Boulder (United States); John J. Hennessy, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Adrian Martin, Sensor Sciences, LLC (United States); Luis V. Rodriguez-de Marcos, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Sanchayeeta Borthakur, Arizona State Univ. (United States); Oswald H. W. Siegmund, Sensor Sciences, LLC (United States); Stephan McCandliss, Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States); Anne Jaskot, Williams College (United States); John O'Meara, W. M. Keck Observatory (United States); Michael Rutkowski, Minnesota State Univ., Mankato (United States); Jason Tumlinson, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States); Manuel A. Quijada, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Ravi Sankrit, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States); Adam Magruder, Nu-Tek Precision Optical Corp. (United States); Javier Del Hoyo, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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SPRITE (Supernova Remnants, Proxies for Reionization Testbed Experiment) is a 12U CubeSat mission funded by NASA and led by the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) at the University of Colorado, Boulder. The payload will house the first sub-arcminute resolution Far-UV long-slit spectrograph with access to the Lyman UV, enabled by new enhanced lithium fluoride coatings and an ultra-low-noise photon-counting microchannel plate (MCP) detector. The scientific mission has two main components with distinct observing modes: for low-redshift galaxies we will operate the MCP detector in photon-counting mode and obtain 2D spectra with a single pointing, while for nearby star forming regions and supernova remnants we will operate the MCP in an accumulation / integration mode and collate multiple pointings of the long slit to create 3D spectroscopic cubes. SPRITE will also take weekly calibration data to characterize the degradation of the coatings and detector. In this proceeding we present these observing modes along with the data acquisition and processing pipeline required to enable scientific analysis on the ground.
13093-115
Author(s): Aafaque R. Khan, Steward Observatory (United States); Carl Hergenrother, Ascending Node Technologies, LLC (United States); Miriam Keppler, Steward Observatory (United States); Jason B. Corliss, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Keri Hoadley, The Univ. of Iowa (United States); Oswald H. W. Siegmund, Adrian Martin, Sensor Sciences, LLC (United States); Carlos J. Vargas, Erika T. Hamden, Haeun Chung, Hannah Tanquary, Thomas J. McMahon, Jacob Vider, Steward Observatory (United States)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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Aspera is a NASA Astrophysics Pioneers SmallSat mission consisting of twin Far-UV spectrographs designed to study diffuse OVI emission (λrest = 103.2 nm) from the warm-hot phase of coronal gas in the halos of nearby galaxies. The two identical spectrographs are optimized to operate in the 103-104 nm share a Cross-delay line (XLD) Microchannel Plate (MCP detector. The payload is currently being assembled at University of Arizona, the payload is expected to integrate into the spacecraft by late 2024-early 2025. In this paper we provide an overview of the on-going ground calibration and performance verification activities of the instrument and the planned in-orbit calibration activities during mission operations. During these calibration, we will measure the spectral, spatial resolution, photometric and astrometric performance of the instrument. These measurement will be used to derive the wavelength solution, effective area, in-orbit noise and pointing models. These results will be applied in the data pipeline for calibration of the science data..
13093-116
Author(s): Maitland Bowen, Brian T. Fleming, Briana L. Indahl, Dmitry Vorobiev, Donal O'Sullivan, Kevin C. France, William Snyder, Alan Ochoa, Lab. for Atmospheric and Space Physics, Univ. of Colorado Boulder (United States); Luis V. Rodriguez-de Marcos, The Catholic Univ. of America (United States), NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Manuel A. Quijada, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); John J. Hennessy, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Oswald H. W. Siegmund, Adrian Martin, Sensor Sciences, LLC (United States)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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Feedback from massive stars through their host galaxies is a crucial driver of galaxy evolution. Massive stars also emit ionizing radiation, a fraction of which escapes into the intergalactic medium. The Supernova remnants/Proxies for Reionization and Integrated Testbed Experiment (SPRITE) is a 12U CubeSat that will observe these processes via its imaging spectrograph. We present the results of ground testing of the flight SPRITE instrument and characterize its projected on-orbit performance. We also demonstrate the capabilities of SPRITE’s unique technological developments, including advanced UV mirror coatings and a low-background microchannel plate detector, providing flight heritage for Habitable Worlds Observatory (HWO) and future missions.
13093-117
Author(s): James E. Rhoads, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Eli Waxman, Avishay Gal-Yam, Yossi Shvartzvald, Eran O. Ofek, Sagi Ben-Ami, Weizmann Institute of Science (Israel); Shahid Habib, NASA (United States); Mark M. Matsumura, Barbara Grofic, Catherine B. Barclay, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Shaun M. Daly, Aaron D. Fournier, NASA Kennedy Space Ctr. (United States); Manuel Bautista, NASA (United States); Udi Netzer, Ofer Lapid, Weizmann Institute of Science (Israel)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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ULTRASAT is a near-ultraviolet imaging satellite with a wide field of view (200 square degrees) and a planned 2026 launch. It is an international partnership led by Israel (Israel Space Agency & Weizmann Institute of Science) in partnership with the United States (NASA) and Germany (DESY). ULTRASAT will provide high cadence observations and rapid target-of-opportunity response, providing a powerful capability for time-domain and multimessenger astrophysics (TDAMM), and will have scientific applications from solar system studies to cosmology. This presentation will explore the ULTRASAT science drivers and capabilities; NASA's roles in the ULTRASAT project (including the launch, an archive, and broad science involvement); and how ULTRASAT fits with NASA scientific priorities.
13093-118
Author(s): Bharat P. Chandra, Binukumar G. Nair, Shubham Ghatul, Shubhangi Jain, Mahesh Babu, Rekhesh Mohan, Margarita Safonova, Jayant Murthy, Indian Institute of Astrophysics (India)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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SING is a near ultraviolet (NUV) spectrograph designed to operate from 1400 Å to 2700 Å with a spectral resolution of around 2Å. The primary science objective is to study the physical conditions in extended regions of the sky like the ISM, supernova remnants (SNR) and planetary nebulae. SING has a telescope with a primary aperture of 298mm, which collects and feeds to a long-slit UV spectrograph. The spectrograph employs a dumbbell slit and a holographic flat-field-corrected concave grating to image the slit at different wavelengths onto the detector. SING employs a photon-counting detector based on an image intensifier and CMOS camera. The spectrograph is intended to map nebulae and other extended objects at moderate spatial and spectral resolution in the NUV from a stable platform of the space station -- Chinese modular space station (CSS). In this work, we present the instrument's optomechanical alignment and assembly, followed by testing and calibration.
13093-119
Author(s): Logan Jensen, Johnathan Gamaunt, Arizona State Univ. (United States); Paul A. Scowen, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Nathaniel Struebel, AZ Space Technologies, LLC (United States); Liam O'Mara, Neil Naik, Arizona State Univ. (United States); David Ardila, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Jim Austin, Jim Austin Consulting, LLC (United States); Travis Barman, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Christophe Basset, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Matthew Beasley, Southwest Research Institute (United States); Lee Bernard, Judd Bowman, Nathaniel Butler, Arizona State Univ. (United States); Dawn Gregory, AZ Space Technologies, LLC (United States); April D. Jewell, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Mary Knapp, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); Daniel Jacobs, Matthew Kolopanis, Cristy Ladwig, Arizona State Univ. (United States); Joe Llama, Lowell Observatory (United States); Victoria Meadows, Univ. of Washington (United States); Shouleh Nikzad, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Sarah Peacock, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Tahina Ramiaramanantsoa, Titu Samson, Evgenya Shkolnik, Arizona State Univ. (United States); Mark Swain, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Todd Veach, Southwest Research Institute (United States)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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We discuss the final assembly, integration, and testing of the Star-Planet Activity Research CubeSat. SPARCS is a 6U CubeSat mission designed to monitor the dual-channel, far-UV (151-176 nm) and near-UV (266-310 nm) photometric activity of nearby low mass stars to advance our understanding of their evolution, activity, and the habitability of surrounding exoplanets. This paper details the assembly of the SPARCS instrument and the testing process to characterize and validate the performance of the payload prior to spacecraft integration. To test SPARCS, we have established a customized CubeSat AIT laboratory and thermal vacuum chamber at ASU equipped to handle CubeSats requiring meticulous contamination control for work in the FUV. After a brief overview of these facilities and the testing plan, we will detail the methods and data used to verify the performance of SPARCS and generate calibration products to reduce raw flight data to high-quality science products. The result will be the delivery of the first highly sensitive FUV astrophysics CubeSat which will inform exoplanet environments and future observations of these systems by facilities like the Habitable Worlds Observatory.
13093-120
Author(s): David R. Ardila, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Evgenya Shkolnik, Arizona State Univ. (United States); Paul A. Scowen, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Tahina Ramiaramanantsoa, Arizona State Univ. (United States); Travis Barman, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Judd Bowman, Arizona State Univ. (United States); Christophe Basset, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Johnathan Gamaunt, Arizona State Univ. (United States); Dawn Gregory, AZ Space Technologies, LLC (United States); Daniel Jacobs, Logan Jensen, Arizona State Univ. (United States); April D. Jewell, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Matthew Kolopanis, Arizona State Univ. (United States); Mary Knapp, MIT Haystack Observatory (United States); Gillian Kyne, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Cristy Ladwig, Arizona State Univ. (United States); Joe Llama, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Victoria Meadows, Univ. of Washington (United States); Shouleh Nikzad, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Sarah Peacock, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Titu Samson, Nathaniel Struebel, Arizona State Univ. (United States); Mark Swain, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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The Start-Planet Activity Research CubeSat (SPARCS) is a NASA-funded mission led by Arizona State University, devoted to characterizing the UV emission of low-mass stars. During the course of its one year mission, SPARCS will observe close to 20 low-mass stars, with the goal of understanding their short and long-term UV variability. SPARCS is expected to be ready for launch in late 2024. Here we present the SPARCS calibration plan, which makes use of observations of very stable white dwarfs to achieve 10% photometric accuracy in both the near- and far-UV bands (Pivot wavelengths 162 nm, 293 nm). SPARCS’ payload is a 10-cm telescope paired with two delta-doped CCDs. While the system is only weakly sensitive in the infrared, the target stars are very bright at long wavelengths. This requires careful correction for out-of-band emission. The system is being fully characterized on the ground to provide supporting data for the calibration.
13093-121
Author(s): Kodi A. Rider, Jason McPhate, William Craig, Cathy Chou, Martin Sirk, Thomas Immel, Anna Butterworth, Space Sciences Lab. (United States); Lara Waldrop, Alex Zhang, Evan Widloski, Univ. of Illinois (United States); John Clarke, Boston Univ. (United States); Pascal Blain, Jérémy Brisbois, Jean-François Vandenrijt, Ctr. Spatial de Liège (Belgium)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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The Carruthers Geocorona Observatory is a NASA Heliophysics mission designed to study the variability of Earth’s hydrogen exosphere. Launching in 2025, the Carruthers Geo-Coronal Imager (GCI) will observe the exosphere at Far Ultraviolet wavelengths from an Earth-Sun L1 vantage point. The GCI consists of two co-aligned imagers that simultaneously provide both wide field observations entire exosphere, in addition to high spatial resolution observations near the Earth’s limb. The optical prescription for both the narrow field imager (NFI) and wide field imager (WFI) is discussed, including critical analyses that were performed during the design phase of the project. A deterministic alignment approach was adopted to verify performances of the imagers at visible wavelengths prior to verification in the vacuum ultraviolet. The details of this alignment plan, along with opto-mechanical considerations and requirements are discussed in detail. Finally, we discuss the imaging performance of the system in the ultraviolet utilizing a ground calibration facility previously developed for another NASA spaceflight mission.
13093-122
Author(s): Patrick Côté, Melissa Amenouche, Deborah Lokhorst, NRC-Herzberg Astronomy & Astrophysics (Canada)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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The CASTOR mission is a wide-field, nearly diffraction-limited, 1m-diameter space telescope that is under development by the Canadian Space Agency. Although the telescope optimized for wide-field imaging surveys at UV/blue-optical wavelengths, it also features low- and medium-resolution spectroscopic capabilities over the 150 to 400 nm region, and precision photometers for observations of transiting exoplanets. This presentation will review the mission design, including spacecraft and payload layout, telescope opto-mechanical design, focal plane arrays and spectroscopic instrument packages, thermal control, altitude and data handling, launch plan, orbit maintenance, communications, electronics, and ground support. The talk will also describe the mission development plan and summarize ongoing work designed to increase technology readiness levels associated with several key mission elements, including the optical design, focal plane array, CMOS detectors, and ultraviolet multi-object spectrograph.
13093-123
Author(s): Joice Mathew, Brad Tucker, Eduardo Trifoni, The Australian National Univ. (Australia)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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A wide-field UV imaging capability is missing in this era of high cadence astronomy even though it can revolutionize our understanding of the transient universe. The recent advancement in UV technologies especially in detector and coating enables the realization of high-throughput small form factor UV payloads for specific science goals. Here we discuss the conceptual development of compact UV imaging payloads for transient observations.
13093-124
Author(s): Ana Inés Gómez de Castro, David Moya, Juan Carlos Vallejo, Univ. Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Ashley Thomson, Tom Conneely, James Milnes, Photek Ltd. (United Kingdom)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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The characterization of the Microchannel plate detector (MCP) of the Far Ultraviolet channel implemented in the imaging instrument on board the WSO-UV observatory is presented. The campaign of qualification tests and the analysis of the results (carried out by the manufacture PHOTEK together with a team from Universidad Complutense de Madrid) cover technical aspects such as quantum efficiency, photon counting uniformity, count rate linearity, spot uniformity, temporal stability or spatial uniformity.
13093-125
Author(s): Paul A. Scowen, Manuel A. Quijada, Alexander Kutyrev, Meng-ping Chang, John Sadleir, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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The Astro2020 Decadal Survey for Astrophysics recommended as its top priority a mission, now named the Habitable Worlds Observatory (HWO), to observe and determine the habitability of 25 Earth-like planets as well as providing advanced capabilities to enable transformational astrophysics. The latter of these charges focuses on instrumentation that will likely deliver wide field visible band imaging and similarly wide field multi-object spectroscopy in the ultraviolet. This talk will address preparations under way at NASA Goddard to deliver the capabilities needed for the ultraviolet spectrograph to perform at the levels necessary to achieve these goals. NASA Goddard brings to the table the marriage of mirror coatings that can deliver reflectivity down to 100nm combined with the necessary uniformity to allow 10^10 contrast coronagraphy, the development of next generation electrostatically controlled microshutter assemblies that can be 2-side butted to deliver arrays large enough to address the fields of view envisioned, and the development of transition edge sensor (TES) devices that can provide noise-less measurements in the ultraviolet.
13093-126
Author(s): Eduard R. Muslimov, Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Coralie Neiner, Lab. d'Etudes Spatiales et d'Instrumentation en Astrophysique (France), Observatoire de Paris, CNRS (France), Univ. PSL, Sorbonne Univ. (France); Jean-Claude Bouret, Lab. d'Astrophysique de Marseille, Aix-Marseille Univ., Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales, CNRS (France)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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Pollux is a project of UV spectropolarimeter proposed as a European contribution for the planned NASA-led Habitable Worlds Observatory. It comprises of four channels. Three of them are operating in the near-UV, medium UV, and visible range, each representing an echelle spectrograph with a birefringent polarimeter. It is possible to reach the resolving power of R130 000 with the maximum throughput of ~11% in the near UV (236-472 nm) and R95 000 with ≤5% transmission in the medium UV (118-236 nm). A fourth channel for the far-UV below Lyman-alpha is studied with a different design. Finally, we provide an overview of the key science goals and the technological risks.
13093-127
Author(s): Roser Juanola-Parramon, Neil Zimmerman, Christopher Stark, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Pin Chen, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Jessica Gersh-Range, N. Jeremy Kasdin, Princeton Univ. (United States); John Krist, Eric Mamajek, Rhonda Morgan, Axel Potier, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Laurent Pueyo, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States); John Sadleir, Paul A. Scowen, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Karl Stapelfeldt, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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The near-ultraviolet wavelength range contains a valuable Ozone absorption feature for characterizing the atmospheric composition of Earth-like exoplanets. Both the LUVOIR and HabEx decadal mission concept studies baselined instrumentation for obtaining photometry of directly imaged exoplanets down to wavelengths of 200 nm. Both of their proposed implementations present challenges: in the case of the HabEx starshade occulter, a separate spacecraft is required; in the case of a UV channel within the main coronagraph instrument, non-UV-optimized optics limit the performance. Yet, the science requirements allow the relaxation of some of the trades of a dedicated near-UV coronagraph. Here we present the preliminary design of a standalone UV coronagraph instrument for the Habitable Worlds Observatory concept based on the science requirements. We describe the trades and rationale behind the decision of separating the UV coronagraph from the main instrument and show the evaluation of several coronagraph designs in the UV. We assess the effect of polarization aberrations and describe potential UV detectors and wavefront sensing and control strategies.
13093-128
Author(s): Mikhail Sachkov, Evgeniy Kopylov, Institute of Astronomy (Russian Federation)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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Spectr-UF (Spectrum UV, another name of the mission is World Space Observatory - Ultraviolet) is a space observatory designed to obtain images and spectra of objects of the Universe in the ultraviolet part of the electromagnetic spectrum (115-305 nm) inaccessible to ground-based instruments. This is the next in a series of astrophysical projects in the Federal Space Program of Russia. In a sense, Spektr-UV is an analogue of the Hubble Space Telescope (NASA) and will replace it in orbit. The main instrument is the T-170M telescope with a main mirror diameter of 170 cm. It is equipped with scientific instruments: a Spectrograph Unit (BS) and a Field Camera Unit (BCP). The observatory will operate in a circular geosynchronous orbit. If the necessary funding is received, the observatory will be ready for launch in 2029. A current status of the mission will be presented.
13093-129
Author(s): Nicholas J. Nell, Patrick Behr, Stefan Ulrich, Nicholas Kruczek, Kevin C. France, Lab. for Atmospheric and Space Physics (United States)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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The Far- and Lyman-Ultraviolet Imaging Demonstrator (FLUID) is a rocket-borne multi-band arcsecond-level ultraviolet (UV) imaging instrument covering four bands between 92 -- 193 nm. FLUID will observe nearby galaxies to find and characterize the most massive stars, the primary drivers of the chemical and dynamical evolution of galaxies, and the co-evolution of the surrounding galactic environment. The first telescope to be fabricated and aligned is the short wavelength channel, F110M, covering 92 -- 115 nm. Each FLUID telescope is a Cassegrain in which each optic is coated with a reflective bandpass filter. The imaging requirement for each telescope is to resolve objects with an angular scale of 4.2'' which corresponds to a physical scale of ~100 parsecs for proposed FLUID targets, low z galaxies. We present the optical alignment method and characterization resulting in a 2.2" full width at half maximum point spread function, meeting the FLUID imaging requirement with substantial margin.
13093-130
Author(s): Mikhail Sachkov, Evgeniy Kopylov, Institute of Astronomy (Russian Federation)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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The Field Camera Unit (FCU) is one of the main scientific instruments of the Spektr-UV space mission. The main task of the BCP is to obtain images of astronomical objects in several spectral ranges. For this purpose , three channels are provided in the design of the FCU: vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) channel (115-176 nm) with high spatial resolution, equipped with an MCP receiver with a CsI photocathode; near ultraviolet (NUV) channel (150-320 nm) with high spatial resolution, equipped with an MCP receiver with a GaN photocathode; near ultraviolet and optical band channel (UVO) (180-1000 nm) with a 4.5 x 4.5 arc min field of view and CMOS receiver. The MCP receivers of the VUV and NUV channels are sun-blind (sensitivity in the optical range is 3-8 orders of magnitude less than in the ultraviolet). In addition to the mode of obtaining images using light filters, a low-resolution field spectroscopy mode is provided.In addition, the optical scheme allows to implement the coronograph mode according to the scheme Lio and polarimeter mode. If there is a request from the scientific community, the list of filters and the parameters can be modified.
13093-131
Author(s): Jason R. Fucik, Caltech (United States)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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The Ultraviolet Explore (UXEX) mission is a wide-field two band imager with a long multi-width slit spectrometer to study the dynamic ultraviolet universe. We present the telescope optical design that provides a continuous 5.0deg x 3.5deg FoV that achieves an rms spot radius of <10 microns. The optical design is a compact unobstructed freeform F/2.7 Three Mirror Anastigmat (TMA) with a 75cm virtual entrance aperture. The all-reflective design is driven to support imaging into the far UV down to 115 nm. The telescope provides light to three instrument channels: a NUV imager (200 - 260 nm), a FUV imager (130 - 190 nm), and a long-slit spectrometer operating over the entire wavelength range (115-265 nm). The spectrometer is an all-reflective re-imager based on an Offner-Chrisp design where the secondary convex mirror is the dispersing element. The spectrometer has a 2deg long slit length with three discrete slit widths of 2", 4", and 8" wide. With a 2" slit width, the spectrometer will have a spectral resolving power of 1400-3200 from 115-265 nm wavelength range.
13093-132
Author(s): Curtis McCully, Las Cumbres Observatory (United States); Keri Hoadley, The Univ. of Iowa (United States)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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Despite their success in cosmology, details about the progenitor systems of type Ia supernova (SNe Ia) remain elusive. The UV is one of the most promising wavebands to provide breakthroughs in the physics of SNe Ia. Here we present a mission concept to study SNe Ia from the bluest optical wavelengths through the far-UV providing constraints on the presence of helium in the ejecta, near-UV excesses due to non-degenerate companion donor stars, and UV data to calibrate low redshift training samples for cosmological analyses. This mission will pave the way for the future of time-domain followup from small satellites.
13093-133
Author(s): Joice Mathew, Andrew Battisti, Brad Tucker, The Australian National Univ. (Australia); Rekhesh Mohan, Indian Institute of Astrophysics (India)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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This paper introduces a mission concept focused on investigating the composition of the interstellar medium (ISM) in the Milky Way and nearby Local Group Galaxies. It emphasizes the prominent ultraviolet (UV) extinction feature at 2175 Å observed in reddened OB stars and proposes carbonate grains as potential carriers. The mission employs UV spectroscopic instruments to map the spatial distribution of extinction features, leveraging recent advancements in coating and detector technologies for high throughput instruments in small form factors. The study outlines an instrument concept, observation strategy, and UV sky simulation for both balloon-based and small satellite-based platforms dedicated to the detailed exploration of UV extinction characteristics.
13093-134
Author(s): Melissa Amenouche, Deborah Lokhorst, Patrick Côté, NRC-Herzberg Astronomy & Astrophysics (Canada)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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CASTOR, for the Cosmological Advanced Survey Telescope for Optical and Ultraviolet Research, is a wide-field space telescope that is under active development by the Canadian Space Agency (CSA). This 1m telescope will produce panoramic imaging of the UV/optical (150-550 nm) sky delivering HST-like image quality over a wide field of view (0.25 sq. deg.), in three filters simultaneously. CASTOR will be optimized for wide-field surveys, although the telescope may also feature low- and medium-resolution spectroscopic capabilities over the 150 to 400 nm region. The poster will describe CASTOR’s unique capabilities within the astronomical landscape in the coming decade, and present highlights from a recently completed Phase 0 study that defined the science mission, including 14 “Legacy Surveys” that span a wide range of fields: including Dark Energy and Weak Lensing; Time Domain and Multi-messenger Astronomy; Galaxy Evolution and AGNs; Star Formation and more. The poster will also show the synergies between CASTOR and other facilities like LSST, Euclid and Nancy-Grace Roman Telescope, focusing on the future contributions of CASTOR to the primary probes of these cosmological surveys.
13093-135
Author(s): Haeun Chung, Carlos J. Vargas, Erika T. Hamden, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Heejoo Choi, The Univ. of Arizona (United States), Large Binocular Telescope Observatory (United States); Sumedha Uppnor, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); April D. Jewell, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Drew M. Miles, Caltech (United States); Manuel A. Quijada, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Luis V. Rodriguez-de-Marcos, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States), The Catholic Univ. of America (United States); Keri Hoadley, The Univ. of Iowa (United States); David Schiminovich, Columbia Univ. (United States)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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Nox is a 12U CubeSat mission concept designed to characterize the Lyman-UV (LUV) and Far-UV (FUV) background across the entire sky. Despite the growing interest in LUV/FUV observations in orbit, the spectral and spatial distribution of the LUV/FUV background remains critically understudied. Without knowledge of background radiation, planning a future mission for detecting faint diffuse emissions becomes challenging. The Nox mission concept has been developed to bridge this gap by characterizing the background radiation in the LUV/FUV. Utilizing state-of-the-art UV coating, grating, and detector technologies, Nox aims to deliver unprecedented foundational data in the LUV/FUV landscape through spectroscopic all-sky observation in the 90-140 nm wavelength range using a wide-field, low spectral resolution spectrograph with a 2.5 degrees by 90 arcsec field of view and R~80. In this presentation, we describe the conceptual payload design of Nox, along with the baseline optical design, detailing the expected diffuse background sensitivity in orbit.
13093-136
Author(s): Fernando Cruz Aguirre, Keri Hoadley, The Univ. of Iowa (United States); Curtis McCully, Las Cumbres Observatory (United States)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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Our current understanding of cosmology is largely shaped by Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), the detonations of carbon-oxygen white dwarves (WDs). SNe Ia are powerful standard candles due to their uniform peak luminosities which decay predictably. SNe Ia progenitor system architecture is highly debated, as none have been observed pre- and post-detonation. Within the first few days after detonation, critical progenitor signatures are preserved in the ultraviolet (UV) bandpass. We present the optical design of UVIa, a proposed 12U CubeSat capable of simultaneous measurements in optical, near-UV, and far-UV channels. The UV channels utilize off-axis parabolic and fold mirrors to image onto a CMOS detector. The optical channel uses on-axis parabolic and fold mirrors, a filter slider, and a separate CMOS detector. We discuss design trades and potential descopes. The optical design of UVIa enables early-time observations of SNe Ia and serves as a pathfinder for future UV transient telescopes.
13093-138
Author(s): Shingo Kameda, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan); Masato Kagitani, Tohoku Univ. (Japan); Go Murakami, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Masaki Kuwabara, Akifumi Nakayama, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan); Fuminori Tsuchiya, Tohoku Univ. (Japan)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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JAXA recently selected LAPYUTA (Life-environmentology, Astronomy, and PlanetarY Ultraviolet Telescope Assembly) as a candidate for JAXA's Small Scale Program No. 6 to be launched by Epsilon in ~2032. We will accomplish the following four objectives: #1 Solar System, #2 Exoplanets, #3 Galaxies, #4 the origin of heavy elements. To achieve these scientific objectives, LAPYUTA aims to carry out spectroscopy with a large effective area (>300 cm2) and a high spatial resolution (0.1 arc-sec) and imaging in far ultraviolet spectral range (110-190 nm). A high dispersion spectrograph with a spectral resolution of < 40000 is required, especially for observing exospheres of terrestrial (Earth-like) exoplanets. We are considering the design of the Spectrograph with High dispersion Echelle grating for the Terrestrial (exo-)planetary Atmosphere (SHETA) as an instrument. In this presentation, we introduce the scientific objective and the conceptual design of the SHETA instrument.
13093-139
Author(s): Go Murakami, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Fuminori Tsuchiya, Masato Kagitani, Tohoku Univ. (Japan); Atsushi Yamazaki, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Kazuo Yoshioka, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Masaki Kuwabara, Shingo Kameda, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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The Life-environmentology, Astronomy, and PlanetarY Ultraviolet Telescope Assembly (LAPYUTA) mission aims to carry out spectroscopy with a large effective area (>300 cm2) and a high spatial resolution (0.1 arc-sec) and imaging in far ultraviolet spectral range (110-190 nm) from a space telescope. The main part of the science payload is a Cassegrain-type telescope with a 60 cm-diameter primary mirror. Two main UV instruments are installed on the focal plane of the telescope: a spectrograph and a slit imager. Here we present the LAPYUTA concept design, the overview of the spacecraft and instruments, and the updated status of technology developments.
13093-140
Author(s): Toshihiro Tsuzuki, Yoshinori Suematsu, Yukio Katsukawa, Hirohisa Hara, Ryoko Ishikawa, Fumihiro Uraguchi, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (Japan); Toshifumi Shimizu, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Shinsuke Imada, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Tomoko Kawate, National Institute for Fusion Science (Japan)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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SOLAR-C is a Japanese solar physics mission with contributions from the United States and European countries. It features the EUV High-Throughput Spectroscopic Telescope (EUVST) for EUV spectroscopy in a wide temperature range (10,000 to 20 million degrees). The optical system's innovation omits an aperture filter, using only a 28 cm off-axis parabolic primary mirror and a diffraction grating assembly composed of two different gratings, resulting in an effective area ten times larger than the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode. This design offers exceptional spatial (0.4 arcseconds) and temporal (1-second) resolution for EUV-UV imaging spectroscopy across a broad wavelength range (170-212 Å, 464-522 Å, 558-610 Å, 719-847 Å, 928-1043 Å, 1115-1221 Å) within a 100x100 arcsecond field of view. A manufacturability-focused trade-off study successfully relaxed the specifications of one grating. This presentation reports the latest optical design, accounting for component constraints, sensitivity analysis, optical performance alignment, and the error budget.
13093-141
Author(s): Yufei Feng, National Astronomical Observatories (China); Xianyong Bai, Sifan Guo, National Astronomical Observatories (China), Univ. of Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Hui Tian, Linyi Chen, Peking Univ. (China); Yuanyong Deng, National Astronomical Observatories (China), Univ. of Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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We propose Global Coronal Diagnostic Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer, which is an imaging spectroscopy with several distantly-separated slits for the measurement of the global coronal spatial and spectral information with high-cadence in spectral range of 18.3–19.8 nm.
13093-142
Author(s): Noel A. Eloriaga, Todd Veach, Michael W. Davis, Philippa M. Molyneux, Gregory Fletcher, Southwest Research Institute (United States)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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The science goal of this proposal is to determine the system-level evolution of fine-scale (0.05 RE) density structure of the Earth's plasmasphere on 1 to 2 minute time scales. Fine-scale cold plasma structure can exert a critical influence on wave and particle dynamics of the magnetosphere and ionosphere. To achieve the project science goal, we propose to develop the High Resolution Plasmasphere Observatory (HRPO), a prototype wide-field extreme ultraviolet (EUV) camera with order-of-magnitude improved spatial and temporal resolution compared to any previously flown plasmasphere imager. The IMAGE EUV imager featured a large (~30º) field-of-view, but a relatively poor (~0.6º) spatial resolution. IMAGE EUV was limited by a detector obscuring most of the entrance aperture (reducing throughput and design flexibility). IMAGE EUV included a spherical-surface detector that was expensive and difficult to manufacture. Improvements in reflective coatings, optical surface manufacturing, and detector sensitivity allow for a new two-mirror off-axis optical design with a flat focal surface.
13093-143
Author(s): Mikhail Sachkov, Evgeniy Kopylov, Institute of Astronomy (Russian Federation)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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The Spektr-UF Space Observatory is considered to be the only large instrument planned for the next decade that will continuously receive data in the far and near UV wavelength ranges. A necessary component of the observatory for planning and implementing a scientific program (preparation of applications and preparation of an observation program) is a special software that allows to evaluate the possibility of registering a signal from an astronomical object of interest. In preparation for the launch of Spektr-UF, the first version of an exposure time calculator was created with the ability to work via a web interface. The report presents the main features of the Spectr-UF exposure time calculator. Based on real examples, the possibility of implementing photometry and spectroscopy of point and extended sources using various scientific instruments of the observatory is discussed. Further plans for the development of this exposure calculator are also discussed.
13093-313
Author(s): Dmitry Vorobiev, Brian T. Fleming, Briana L. Indhal, Donal O'Sullivan, Grace M. Halferty, William Snyder, Lab. for Atmospheric and Space Physics, Univ. of Colorado Boulder (United States); Sreejith Aickara Gopinathan, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften (Austria)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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Multi-object and integral field spectroscopy are enabling technologies for the next generation of space telescopes, including upcoming flagships like the Habitable Worlds Observatory and beyond. A promising technology to perform spatially multiplexed spectroscopy is the digital micromirror device (DMD), a commercially available array of small mirrors, which can be used for object selection, as well as more complex observing modes. Building on the technology maturation performed during previous NASA programs, we have developed the Supernova and Stellar Feedback Rapid-Acquisition Spectrograph (SASAFRAS) – an advanced multi-object and integral field spectrograph for the NUV regime (200 – 400 nm), deployed on the SuperBIT long duration balloon platform. SASAFRAS is designed to carry-out two scientific campaigns: 1) spectroscopic follow-up observations of supernova (and other bright transients), within minutes after their discovery; and 2) a spatially resolved survey of nearby star forming galaxies and their environments. SASAFRAS will achieve a spectral resolution of R~1000, over a 20 arcminute diameter field of view, with a spatial resolution of ~1 arcsec.
Session PS2: Posters - UV Technology
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
13093-145
Author(s): Jérémy Brisbois, Frédéric Rabecki, Julien Rosin, Cédric Hardy, Pascal Blain, Alexandra Mazzoli, Ctr. Spatial de Liège (Belgium); Jérôme Loïcq, Technische Univ. Delft (Netherlands); Jean-François Vandenrijt, Cédric Lénaerts, Karl Fleury-Frenette, Ctr. Spatial de Liège (Belgium)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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The Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) onboard the ESA-CAS Solar wind Magnetosphere Ionosphere Link Explorer (SMILE) joint mission is a CMOS-based ultraviolet camera developed for imaging Earth's northern auroral regions over the 160-180 nm UV waveband with a 10° × 10° field of view. Central to the instrument, four thin film-coated mirrors guide light into its detector and ensure most of the signal filtering, crucial to achieve a high out-of-band rejection and limit contributions from solar diffusion, dayglow and unwanted atomic spectral lines. Here we present the mirror spectrally selective reflective coating which is based on an interferential MgF2/LaF3 multilayer stack deposited by ion-assisted electron-beam evaporation. Its reflectivity maximum is above 85% and the wavelength at which it occurs is adjustable within 1 nm, whereas the out-of-band reflectivity between 120 nm and 155 nm and between 200 nm and 1100 nm remains below 6% on average. The coating has been space qualified (thermal cycling under vacuum, radiations, UV exposure…) and shows stable performances in conditions representative of the instrument operation environment.
13093-146
Author(s): Sona Hosseini, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States), Caltech (United States); Guillaume Gronoff, Science Systems and Applications, Inc. (United States); Bjorn Davidsson, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Anthony Colaprete, NASA Ames Research Ctr. (United States); Amanda Hendrix, Planetary Science Institute (United States)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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Here, we report the development of an ultra-miniature high-sensitive near UV spectrometer to determine the abundance or the upper limit of the water in the lunar atmosphere and investigate the processes that control its distribution and variability. Heterodyne OH Lunar Miniature Spectrometer (HOLMS) is based on the Michelson design Spatial Heterodyne Spectrometry (SHS) technique, a novel approach for high R in a compact, low-cost, low-mass, low-power architecture. HOLMS is designed to observe Hydroxyl (OH) molecules in the lunar exosphere in 311-317 nm and 0.1 nm spectral resolution. OH radicals are key lunar water surrogate molecules produced during solar UV-light dissociation; therefore, measuring it reveals critical information about the lunar water cycle and resources. Acknowledgments: This work has been conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA: copyright 2024, California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.
13093-147
Author(s): Adrien Girardot, Coralie Neiner, Jean-Michel Réess, Lab. d'Etudes Spatiales et d'Instrumentation en Astrophysique (France), Observatoire de Paris, CNRS (France), Univ. PSL, Sorbonne Univ. (France)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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There are currently no high-resolution, wide wavelength range spectropolarimeters in the UV domain. This represents a critical gap in our observational capabilities. Overcoming this challenge holds the promise of opening up new frontiers in the study of celestial objects, from star-planet interactions to cosmology. The design of the POLLUX spectropolarimeter for the HWO mission comprises four channels in the visible, near-UV, mid-UV, and far-UV ranges. While MgF2 will be used for polarimeters in the former three, the challenge arises in the far-UV range (100-120nm), where the absence of known transparent birefringent glasses poses a substantial hurdle. The solution lies in the development of a new type of spectropolarimeter – the reflective FUV polarimeter. After a first study conducted several years ago, the goal of this work is to improve the TRL of this new kind on spectropolarimeter. This article describes the proposed design of the FUV polarimeter for HWO, the optimisation process using the Mueller calculus, as well as the ongoing prototyping and tests conducted.
13093-148
Author(s): Jesper Skottfelt, David J. Hall, Chiaki Crews, Ben Dryer, Oliver Hetherington, The Open Univ. (United Kingdom); Doug Jordan, David Morris, Teledyne e2v UK Ltd. (United Kingdom)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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For the next generation of large space telescopes, imaging in the UV band will be of high importance. UV optimisation technologies and high-performing CMOS imaging sensors will therefore be essential for these missions to be able to fulfil their science requirements. The CASTOR mission, a 1m UV space telescope project, will be utilising the large format CIS303 and CIS120 detectors from Teledyne e2v for three large focal planes covering the NUV, u’ and g’ bands, respectively. With the NUV band covering the 150-300nm wavelength range, the 2d-doping technology from NASA/JPL will be utilised to improve the quantum efficiency. The Open University will perform electro-optical testing and space qualification of the CIS303 and CIS120 detectors, including a comparison of different UV coating and enhancement technologies, and we present the most recent results of this work.
13093-149
Author(s): Ana Inés Gómez de Castro, Univ. Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Miguel Chávez, Rafael Izazaga, Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica (Mexico); Maria Frutos Pastor, Univ. Complutense de Madrid (Spain); León Restrepo, Institución Univ. de Envigado (Colombia); Shingo Kameda, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan); Juan Carlos Vallejo, Univ. Complutense de Madrid (Spain)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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The Lunar Ultraviolet Observatory is designed to map the Earth exosphere, the magnetosphere and the near-Earth space. The observatory is a small space telescope to be set in Lunar orbit to produce wide field images (~20x20 deg2) in narrow and broad bands in the 115-175 nm spectral range. In this presentation, we will describe the results of the on-going tests of critical optical elements.
13093-150
Author(s): Brock Parker, Erika T. Hamden, Aafaque R. Khan, The Univ. of Arizona (United States)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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Our group is working on developing Skipper CCDs with enhanced UV QE. In this paper we present the design and readout electronics for a 128-amplifier Skipper CCD. We calculate theoretical Skipper noise models and optimize readout times for a selection of scenarios. We provide the status of our on-going effort for extensive characterization of the noise performance of delta-doped enhanced Skipper CCDs, including our characterization setup and absolute quantum efficiency measurements. We propose a tentative project timeline, including planned lot runs, characterization tests, and on-sky testing.
13093-151
Author(s): Olivia Jones, Keri Hoadley, The Univ. of Iowa (United States)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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To broaden our characterization of light observed in our universe, we investigated the polarization performance in the Far Ultraviolet (FUV) range of 100-200 nm. Our plan to accomplish this is to build a polarizer for the FUV range and study its transmission efficiency in the lab. We have begun a trade study of different reflective element polarization designs specific for FUV/Vacuum UV wavelengths. This included using computer simulated polarizers and optics to observe alignment tolerance analysis, performing stray light signal analysis based on changing the angle of incidence, and determining how several different mirror coatings impact polarization performance as a function of wavelength.
13093-152
Author(s): Manuel A. Quijada, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Luis V. Rodriguez-de-Marcos, The Catholic Univ. of America (United States); Javier G. Del Hoyo, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Devin M. Lewis, Brigham Young Univ. (United States); Edward J. Wollack, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Tanner D. Rydalch, David D. Allred, Brigham Young Univ. (United States)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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Recent developments in performing Physical Vapor Deposition in combination with fluorination by using a XeF2 gas have enabled the production of aluminum (Al) protected with a LiF overcoat with unprecedented reflectance performance in the FUV in addition to improved environmental stability. This coating technology involves a collaboration between the Goddard Space Flight Center and the Brigham Young University. This novel process has produced Al mirrors with FUV a state-of-the-art reflectivity of around 91% at 121.6 nm. In this paper, we report on environmental/material property characterization of these XeF2 fluorinated samples. This is done in order to advance the TRL for these Al+LiF mirror coatings.
13093-153
Author(s): Luc Damé, Mustapha Meftah, Nicolas Rouanet, Lab. Atmosphères, Milieux, Observations Spatiales (France); Pierre Etcheto, Jacques Berthon, Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales (France)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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SUAVE (Solar Ultraviolet Advanced Variability Experiment) is a far UV imaging solar telescope (Lyman Alpha, 121.6 nm, Herzberg continuum, 200-242 nm, etc.) of novel design for ultimate thermal stability and long lasting performances over several years instead of, often, a few weeks or months in this wavelength range. SUAVE is a 80 mm Ritchey-Chrétien off-axis telescope with "mushroom type" SiC mirrors and no entrance window for long and uncompromising observations in the UV (no coatings of mirrors, flux limited to less than a solar constant on filters to avoid their degradation), associated with an ultimate thermal control (no central obscuration resulting in limited thermal gradients and easier heat evacuation, focus control, stabilization). Design and performances will be detailed as well as results of thermal/optical tests performed on the SiC primary mirror and its regulated support plate also in SiC. Plans for the realization of a representative telescope breadboard for testing both optical and thermal properties are presented. SUAVE is foreseen as the main instrument of the Solar/Climate microsatellite SoSWEET mission sized for New Space era platforms and launchers.
13093-154
Author(s): Jared A. Termini, Keri Hoadley, Casey T. DeRoo, Cecilia R. Fasano, The Univ. of Iowa (United States); Paul A. Scowen, Manuel A. Quijada, Mateo Batkis, Luis V. Rodriguez-de-Marcos, Javier G. Del Hoyo, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Erika T. Hamden, Jessica S. Li, The Univ. of Arizona (United States)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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Ultraviolet spectroscopy plays a vital role in studying exoplanets. Future UV spectrographs will require large-format, high-performance gratings (R > 10,000). Unfortunately, measuring the UV performance of a large-format grating from 900-2000Å is resource-intensive and requires large special vacuum facilities, hampering UV grating development. An efficient characterization process will save time and reduce costs, facilitating the development of blazed UV gratings for next-gen UV space telescopes. This work is part of an effort to determine if we can leverage trends found between measured UV grating performance (on small stamp-size gratings) and the grating’s intrinsic, fabricated characteristics to estimate the expected performance of large-format UV gratings. Thus streamlining the process of grating characterization for future UV missions. Here, we present a pilot study using an 855 nm period grating. We characterize the grating’s fabrication quality via interferometry and single-point metrology. Finally, we measure the grating's diffraction efficiencies and investigate any trends between its performance and its fabrication qualities.
13093-155
Author(s): William Snyder, Dmitry Vorobiev, Grace M. Halferty, Dana Chafetz, Brian T. Fleming, Lab. for Atmospheric and Space Physics (United States)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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A NASA-funded technology maturation effort to develop multi-object spectroscopy in space will be performed with a digital micromirror device (DMD) on the Spectroscopic Ultraviolet Multi-object Observatory (SUMO) Prototype. It will be the first DMD-based instrument to operate in space as a secondary payload on the CU Boulder sounding rocket INFUSE. The SUMO Prototype consists of: a DMD manufactured by Texas Instruments, an off-the-shelf camera for the imaging channel, a custom NUV CCD camera developed in-house at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) for the spectral channel, a Raspberry Pi for the flight computer, a controller for the DMD, and an electrical power system (EPS) with a rechargeable battery. The SUMO Prototype is nominally scheduled for flight in the Spring of 2025.
13093-156
Author(s): Fabien Grisé, Randall McEntaffer, The Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States); Brian T. Fleming, Kevin C. France, Lab. for Atmospheric and Space Physics (United States); Stephan McCandliss, Mackenzie Carlson, Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States); Briana L. Indahl, Lab. for Atmospheric and Space Physics (United States); Jake McCoy, The Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States); Drew M. Miles, Caltech (United States)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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The 2020 NASA decadal survey's highest priority is an IR/O/UV large telescope optimized for observing habitable exoplanets and for general astrophysics. This project, known as Habitable World Observatory (HWO), has strong UV scientific drivers requiring the need for high-efficiency, high-resolution diffraction gratings. To meet those requirements, the ongoing development of UV-optimized gratings is key. To that end, we summarize our past and ongoing projects that relate to the fabrication of high-performance EUV (10-90 nm) and FUV (100-180 nm) gratings using electron-beam lithography and subsequent etching. This technology enables a high degree of customization with patterns that can have straight or curved grooves on a variety of substrates, allowing for aberration-correcting capabilities. Building on those efforts, we will report our ongoing programs to fabricate the UV gratings for the MOBIUS and FORTIS suborbital sounding rocket missions, as well as for the MANTIS CubeSat. This work not only serves as technology development for future large observatories like HWO, but also allows new science to be done onboard smaller missions.
13093-157
Author(s): Raveena Khan, Indian Institute of Astrophysics (India)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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Understanding the coronal magnetism is important to answer long-standing questions in the solar physics, such as the problem of high coronal temperatures, the acceleration of solar energetic particles, and the dynamics behind the solar eruptions that drive the geospace weather. Our recent study has reported coronal emission lines in the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) which are, in principle, sensitive to the weak magnetic field of the solar corona via the Hanle effect. However, measurements of the coronal magnetic field have remained sporadic till date, due to the challenges faced in designing and manufacturing high-reflectivity and high-polarizing optics for successful operation in the EUV spectral range. In this work, thin-film fabrication of highly reflective mirrors is performed in EUV spectral range between 740 to 800 Å using the beamline facility of the RRCAT, Indore. The properties of the fabricated mirrors are studied in terms of their long-term stability, throughput and polarizing power.
13093-158
Author(s): Gillian Kyne, April D. Jewell, Shouleh Nikzad, Michael E. Hoenk, John J. Hennessy, Todd J. Jones, Robin E. Rodríguez, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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We will outline the performance of delta-doped, photon-counting UV detectors (EMCCDs). We will present the recent quantum efficiency (QE) data from devices optimized for the FIREBall-2, an astrophysics balloon mission with a bandpass centered at 205 nm, as well as devices optimized heliophysics instrumentation for observing nitric oxide (NO) signals at 215. We will also discuss the newest detector developed for FIREBall-2 with an integrated solar-blind, UV bandpass filter; analysis will include an overall detector noise characterization.
Session PS3: Posters - Athena Instruments
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
13093-159
Author(s): Anirudh Mukund Saraf, Valeria Antonelli, Daniel Pietschner, Astrid Mayr, Johannes Müller-Seidlitz, Olaf Hälker, Hermine Schnetler, Kirpal Nandra, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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The differing operating temperatures of the DePFET sensor and the closely located Front-End Electronics require a thermal solution with two separate cooling chains for the Camera Head of the WFI instrument. The chosen solution minimizes the total area needed for Camera Head cooling. This paper explains the thermal design and cooling concept, which includes using highly conductive graphene thermal straps and considers the parasitic heat exchange between the two cooling chains due to the large number of bond wires and radiative heat exchange.
13093-160
Author(s): Emanuele Taralli, Roland H. den Hartog, Henk J. van Weers, Johannes Dercksen, Brian D. Jackson, Pourya Khosropanah, Jan-Willem A. den Herder, Peter Roelfsema, Damian Audley, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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This paper describes the evaluation of the global shielding factor of the Development Model (DM) of the X-ray Integral Field Unit Focal Plane Assembly (X-IFU FPA) for the Athena X-ray observatory. We use a number of TES detectors spread over the south quadrant of the array as very sensitive magnetometers. We discuss the difficulties in performing a measurement like this where a Helmholtz coil outside the cryostat were used to apply a small magnetic field (< 200 µH) in order to avoid any permanent magnetization of the cryo mu metal (CMM) shield. Both AC and DC external magnetic fields have been applied at different orientation respect to the detector plate. Preliminary results set a lower limit in the evaluation of the global FPA shielding factor of ~ 10^5. Improvement in the measurement setup and in the analysis will be discussed and eventually applied to the following model of the FPA.
13093-161
Author(s): Davide Vaccaro, Jan van der Kuur, Martin de Wit, Luciano Gottardi, Kevin Ravensberg, Emanuele Taralli, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Joseph S. Adams, Simon R. Bandler, James A. Chervenak, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Bertrand W. Doriese, Carl Reintsema, National Institute of Standards and Technology (United States); Kazuhiro Sakai, Stephen J. Smith, Nick A. Wakeham, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Brian D. Jackson, Pourya Khosropanah, Jian-Rong Gao, Peter Roelfsema, Jan-Willem A. den Herder, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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ESA’s Athena X-IFU will aim to provide high-energy (2.5 eV at energies up to 7 keV) and high-spatial (5") resolution spectroscopy over the energy range from 200 eV to 12 keV, by means of an array of transition-edge sensors (TES) readout via time-domain multiplexing (TDM). SRON is responsible for the delivery of the focal plane assembly (FPA) for X-IFU, whose Demonstration Model (DM) will use for the first time a TDM-based readout. To study the operation of TDM towards the framework of X-IFU's FPA-DM, we received in late 2022 a cryogenic test-bed from NIST and NASA Goddard Space Flight, whose performance was limited to 2.8 eV with 16-pixel multiplexing (instead of 32), due to the length of the harness connecting the 4 K stage to the room temperature electronics. In late 2023 we received new harness, designed to mitigate the limitation on the system performance. We report on the TDM system performance with the new flex harness, addressing issues related to their length such as electrical ringing and crosstalk. We discuss the envisaged methods to overcome them, the laboratory tests for their validation and an outlook on the future activities for its integration on X-IFU's FPA-DM.
13093-162
Author(s): Francisco Javier Veredas, Sebastian Albrecht, Robert Andritschke, Günter Hauser, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Marko Mecina, Univ. Wien (Austria); Kirpal Nandra, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Roland Ottensamer, Univ. Wien (Austria); Hermine Schnetler, Andreas Lederhuber, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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We present the electrical ground support equipment (EGSE) for the ESA NewAthena WFI. A WFI Structural and Thermal Model (STM), and Engineering Model (EM) prototype consisting of the Camera Head Sub-System (CHS) and Detector Electronics Sub-System (DES) is under development and completion is expected to mid-2024. The use of the WFI EGSE for the CHS and DES test campaign within the Max Planck Institute for extra-terrestrial physics test facilities is also described.
13093-163
Author(s): Emanuele Perinati, Andrea Santangelo, Chris Tenzer, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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The Wide Field Imager (WFI) is one of the two focal plane instruments onboard ESA´s New-Athena space mission.It is a DEPFET-based X-ray detector operating in the energy range between 0.2 and 12 keV.During the former phase A/B1 a study of the camera configuration,largely based on Geant4 simulations,has been performed within the WFI background working group,in order to identify the shielding specifications and methods for the optimization of the trade-off between expected background and radiation damage.In this paper we summarize the findings as a result of the investigation focusing on ongoing activities at IAAT and discuss them in light of the SRG/eROSITA in-flight experience.
13093-164
Author(s): Anna-Katharina Schweingruber, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Steven W. Allen, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics & Cosmology (United States), Stanford Univ. (United States); Sebastian Albrecht, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Sven C. Herrmann, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics & Cosmology (United States); Astrid Mayr, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Glenn Morris, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics & Cosmology (United States); Johannes Müller-Seidlitz, Kirpal Nandra, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Peter Orel, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics & Cosmology (United States); Jonas Reiffers, Hermine Schnetler, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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This paper presents an overview of the design and development of VERITAS 2.3, an evolutionary step of the VERITAS (VErsatile Readout based on Integrated Trapezoidal Analog Shapers) readout integrated circuit (ROIC) architecture designed for high-speed, low noise readout of the DEPFET detectors in the Wide Field Imager on ESA’s Athena X-ray satellite. The chip includes 64 channels, delivering a short processing time of 2.5 µs per readout while targeting a system noise of 3 e- ENC RMS, enabling nearly Fano-limited spectroscopic performance. While the new chip still uses previous versions’ proven 0.35 µm CMOS technology node, we have employed new foundry and process options for better manufacturability and improved reliability. This paper discusses several design improvements like MIM caps instead of poly caps, fully differential drivers and better ADC connectivity.
13093-166
Author(s): Francisco Javier Veredas, Andreas Lederhuber, Jonas Reiffers, Olaf Hälker, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Jaroslav Laifr, Astronomical Institute of the CAS, v.v.i. (Czech Republic); Samuel Pliego, Thomas Schanz, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany); Benjamin Mican, Sebastian Albrecht, Hermine Schnetler, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Christopher Tenzer, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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This paper will present the current status of the Detector Electronics (DES) development for the ESA NewAthena WFI. One STM for structural and thermal tests as well as two EMs to operate a Large Detector (LD) and a Fast Detector (FD) of the DES are under development. Each of the DESs consists of three modules: Galvanic Isolation Module (GIM), Power Conditioning Module (PCM) and Frame Processing Module (FPM).
13093-167
Author(s): Manuel Adler Abreu, Instituto de Astrofísica e Ciências do Espaço (Portugal); Alexandre Cabral, Instituto de Astrofísica e Ciências do Espaço (Portugal), Univ. de Lisboa (Portugal); José Rebordão, Instituto de Astrofísica e Ciências do Espaço (Portugal); Nuno M. Gonçalves, Instituto de Astrofísica e Ciências do Espaço (Portugal), Univ. de Lisboa (Portugal); Sergio Mottini, Thales Alenia Space Italia (Italy); João Costa Pinto, EVOLEO Technologies (Portugal); Miguel Santos, Frezite High Performance, Lda (Portugal); Davide Oddenino, European Space Research and Technology Ctr., European Space Agency (Netherlands)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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Athena is ESA’s X-ray observatory mission designed to address the Hot and Energetic Universe theme. The instrument consists of a single x-ray telescope, supported by a large area mirror focusing the photon flux alternatively onto two different instruments The process of switching the focus between the two instruments is produced by changing the pointing of the main X-ray mirror. The verification of the alignment of the mirror optical axis with respect to each of the instruments with accuracy better than 0.5 arcsec is achieved by means of an optical On-board Metrology System (OBM). In this work we will present the experimental setup and processing architecture designed for calibration and testing the OBM demonstrator allowing to evaluate the performance of the on-board metrology system for the Athena X-ray Observatory mission.
13093-168
Author(s): Henk J. van Weers, Brian D. Jackson, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Sylvain Martin, Jean-Marc Duval, CEA-Grenoble (France); Philippe Peille, Oceane Maisonnave, Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales (France)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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This work describes the magnetic modelling process of the X ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU) multi-stage ADR last stage cooler and its effect on the Focal Plane Assembly (FPA) for the Athena X-ray observatory. Superposition of 2D axis-symmetric non-linear magnetic models are used to predict magnetic field levels outside the ADR cooler in absence of the FPA. Spatial variations of the relative permeability inside the ADR stage iron shields at different coil current levels is used to create a 3D linearized magnetic model. The FPA and its magnetic shields are added to this 3D model to make final predictions for the magnetic field inside the FPA produced by the multi-stage ADR at various points during the operation cycle.
13093-169
Author(s): David Murat, Laurent Ravera, Yann Parot, Thierry Camus, Odile Coeur-Joly, Corentin Guerin, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie (France)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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The DRE (Digital Readout Electronics) of Athena X-IFU consists of three main parts: i) The Row Address and Synchronisation module synchronises the time domain multiplexed readout of the Focal Plane Assembly. ii) the Demultiplexer Module (DEMUX) linearises the cold front-end electronics and demultiplexes pixels data. iii) the Event Processor Module detects the events and measures the energy and arrival time of the X-ray photons. We have developed a demonstration model (DM) of the DEMUX module. It is representative of the flight model (size, components, design rules, mechanics, etc.). Its aim is to demonstrate the functionalities and performances of our electronics. The DEMUX DM is also a means of practicing operational procedures such as the so-called expertise procedures: These are test scenarios defined to characterise the instrument detection chains in order to identify the optimal operating points.
13093-170
Author(s): Henk J. van Weers, Auke Veninga, Johannes P. C. Dercksen, Simon van Alphen, Roland H. den Hartog, Emanuele Taralli, Brian D. Jackson, Jan-Willem A. den Herder, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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This work describes the alignment verification test program performed on the X ray Integral Field Unit Focal Plane Assembly (X-IFU FPA) Development Model (DM). The alignment of the detector stage with respect to the external interfaces in warm conditions is verified by mechanical measurements on a 3D measurement machine. In addition relative movement of the detector stage compared to the outer structure is monitored in 5 Degrees Of Freedom (DoF) during several thermal cycles. The acquired data is compared to mechanical models using a rigid body transformation description. Finally, these results are used in the alignment strategy within the X-IFU FPA using the available alignment budget estimates.
13093-171
Author(s): Si Chen, Damien Prêle, Manuel Gonzalez, Jean Mesquida, Bernard Courty, Michael Punch, Horacio Arnaldi, Bao Ton, Jean Lesrel, Astroparticule et Cosmologie (France)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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This paper gives a review of the ASIC design evolutions of the WFEE in the context of the ATHENA mission. The development follows the evolutions of the X-IFU instrument detection chain and secures the ASIC technology access continuity by using an ST SiGe 130 nm technology instead of the previous use of an AMS SiGe 350 nm node. First ASIC prototypes based on this ST 130 nm SiGe technology have been developed to answer these technical challenges and meet the new requirements. We will present these ASICs, the functions integrated into each integrated circuit and the improvements they have brought to the WFEE.
13093-172
Author(s): Roland H. den Hartog, Emanuele Taralli, Damian Audley, Henk J. van Weers, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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This paper describes the thermal characterization of the Development Model (DM) of the X ray Integral Field Unit Focal Plane Assembly (X-IFU FPA) for the Athena X-ray observatory. We discuss the requirements on the thermal aspects of the FPA, and compare these with the results of a series of measurements made with the thermal model of the FPA DM (DM-TH): thermal stability, cryogenic heat loads, thermal capacity, conductance and time constants of the temperature stages in the FPA.
13093-173
Author(s): Valeria Antonelli, Daniel Pietschner, Rafael Strecker, Benjamin Mican, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Tomasz Barcinski, Adam Sikorski, Szymon Polak, Space Research Ctr. (Poland); Hermine Schnetler, Kirpal Nandra, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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The Wide Field Imager (WFI) is one of two complementary focal plane cameras on ESA’s X-ray observatory Athena, whose launch is planned for 2036. This paper presents the preliminary design of the instrument based on its structural, thermal, and functional requirements, together with its numerical and experimental verification.
13093-174
Author(s): Michael Punch, Manuel Gonzalez, Horacio Arnaldi, Si Chen, Damien Prêle, Astroparticule et Cosmologie (France)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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In the context of the ATHENA X-ray space mission, the X-ray integral field unit (X-IFU) warm front-end electronic (WFEE) is a multichannel differential readout sub-system. As part of the verification of the performance several measurements are carried out, initially on the demonstrator model of X-IFU’s WFEE, and later for the production models. The transfer function from the 8 channels included in a demonstrator are measured, for excitation from a few 10s of Hz up to 50 MHz. Over the same frequency range, the inter-channel coupling and cross-talk are measured at a level below -80 dB. We also measure the power supply rejection ratio. For these purposes, a lock-in amplifier is used in differential mode, especially to extract the small cross-talk signals which are at the same frequency as the input excitation. We discuss the design of the demonstrator model mitigating cross-talk and the way we measure in differential the residual channels coupling.
13093-175
Author(s): Bao Ton, Manuel Gonzalez, Horacio Arnaldi, Si Chen, Damien Prêle, Astroparticule et Cosmologie (France)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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Space environment Ionizing particles could cause an increase of electronic flicker noise on a detection chain readout. We will present low frequency noise measurements of a readout subsystem and effect of total ionizing dose up to 100 krad obtained thanks to the irradiation of our electronics with 60Co source. We will discuss the impact on the noise readout of such radiation effects over the life-time of a space mission as ATHENA.
13093-176
Author(s): Damien Prêle, Manuel Gonzalez, Horacio Arnaldi, Si Chen, Bernard Courty, Alain Givaudan, Mael Le Cam, Jean Lesrel, Michael Punch, Astroparticule et Cosmologie (France)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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The ATHENA space mission will be the next generation X-ray observatory. The X-ray integral field unit (X-IFU) is ATHENA’s cryogenic spectro-imager observing the sky with thousands of superconducting micro-calorimeters. The detectors are based on transition edge sensors (TES) in time-division multiplexing (TDM). A Warm front-end electronic (WFEE) demonstrator model (DM) has been developed for the low noise biasing and readout of X-IFU’s cryogenic detection chain. After extensive testing, it has been delivered to the French space agency (CNES) for integration in the full detection chain DM. The WFEE DM is capable of reading out and biasing 8 TDM channels. Different configurations were chosen for some of the channels in order to find the best performance after testing of the full readout chain DM. Design and measured performances will be presented and discussed.
Session PS4: Posters - Optics
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
13093-177
Author(s): Jeroen Haneveld, Bart Schurink, Marko Blom, Mathijs Bosman, Bastiaan van Dam, Arenda Koelewijn, Jan-Joost Lankwarden, Mark Olde Riekerink, Ronald Start, Maurice Wijnperlé, Micronit B.V. (Netherlands); Maximilien J. Collon, Ramses Günther, Laurens Keek, Boris Landgraf, Adam Lassise, Paulo da Silva Ribeiro, Aniket Thete, Giuseppe Vacanti, cosine measurement systems (Netherlands); Marcos Bavdaz, Ivo Ferreira, Eric Wille, European Space Agency (Netherlands)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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This paper presents an overview of the current state-of-the-art manufacturing process for Silicon Pore Optics mirror plates for NewATHENA. After more than 15 years of process development and with mission adoption expected in 2027, the focus starts to shift towards upscaling and optimizing the production process, to prepare for flight production. We will present recent progress and an outlook towards the future flight production scenario, touching on several areas of the manufacturing process, such as dicing, laser-ID labeling, automated measurement of plate parameters, and photolithography.
13093-178
Author(s): Alberto Moretti, Daniele Spiga, Stefano Basso, Giovanni Pareschi, Giorgia Sironi, Mauro Ghigo, Marta M. Civitani, Vincenzo Cotroneo, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy); Nicola La Palombara, Michela Uslenghi, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica cosmica Milano (Italy); Giuseppe Valsecchi, Fabio Marioni, Dervis Vernani, Fabio Zocchi, Media Lario S.r.l. (Italy); Massimiliano Tordi, Simone De Lorenzi, EIE S.r.l. (Italy); Giancarlo Parodi, Matteo Ottolini, BCV Progetti S.r.l. (Italy); Franco Amisano, Apogeo Space S.r.l. (Italy); Desirée Della Monica Ferreira, Technical Univ. of Denmark (Denmark); Vadim Burwitz, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Stuart Coleman, John Burnett, Sigray, Inc. (United States); Ivo Ferreira, Paolo Corradi, Marcos Bavdaz, European Space Agency (Netherlands); Gaetano Pecoraro, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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The ground calibration of the New-ATHENA mirror poses significant challenges owing to its unprecedented size, mass, and focal length. VERT-X is innovative calibration facility designed to tackle this exceptionally demanding task. It relies on an X-ray parallel beam, generated by a micro-focus source positioned at the focus of an X-ray collimator. A raster-scan mechanism enables the beam movement, covering all ATHENA optics at varying off-axis angles. The compactness of the concept offers several benefits, including the vertical geometry which implies minimal PSF degradation due to lateral gravity. Furthermore, this allows for a flexible choice of location. Indeed one of the most important feature of VERT-X is its contiguity with the mirror integration facility. The driving factor in the VERT-X design is to meet the ATHENA calibration requirement for Half-Energy Width (HEW) accuracy at 0.1”. Key contributors to the error budget in the VERT-X design include the source size, collimator error, and raster-scan pointing accuracy. This paper provides an overview of the current status of the development of these critical parts and of the first results of their performance test.
13093-179
Author(s): Giuseppe Vacanti, Luis Abalo, Nicolas M. Barrière, Alex Bayerle, Donny de Borst, Luigi Castiglione, Abdelhakim Chatbi, Maximilien J. Collon, Loes Crama, Noë Eenkhoorn, David Girou, Ramses Günther, James Harpur, Enrico Hauser, Jasper den Hollander, Yvette Jenkins, Laurens Keek, Christian Körnig, Boris Landgraf, Adam Lassise, Sebastian Obwaller, Ben Okma, Paulo da Silva Ribeiro, Chris Rizos, Aniket Thete, Sjoerd Verhoeckx, Mark Vervest, Roel Visser, Luc Voruz, cosine measurement systems (Netherlands)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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Silicon Pore Optics (SPO) is the optic technology selected for the production of the hundreds of mirror modules that will comprise the European Space Agency's NewAthena X-ray mirror assembly. Each mirror module starts from pristine silicon wafers that are taken through many physical, mechanical and chemical steps to produce the about 160 individual mirror plates that are needed for its construction. At each step in the production chain data are used to tune the details of each process, and new data are collected to assess the quality of the output. In this paper we describe how the different pieces of data that become available during the production of the optics are brought together in a system of data bases and software pipelines that is meant to serve both the scientific and the production quality needs associated with such a large effort. A few examples will be described to illustrate the current status of these efforts and the work that remains to be done before the production of the newAthena optics begins in earnest.
13093-180
Author(s): Davide Sisana, Politecnico di Milano (Italy), INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy); Bianca Salmaso, Daniele Spiga, Stefano Basso, Mauro Ghigo, Gabriele Vecchi, Giorgia Sironi, Vincenzo Cotroneo, Giovanni Pareschi, Gianpiero Tagliaferri, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy); Michela Uslenghi, Mauro Fiorini, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica cosmica Milano (Italy); Claudio Ferrari, Elena Ferrari, Istituto dei Materiali per l'Elettronica ed il Magnetismo, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (Italy); Vadim Burwitz, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Maximilien J. Collon, Giuseppe Vacanti, Nicolas M. Barrière, David Girou, cosine measurement systems (Netherlands); Marcos Bavdaz, Ivo Ferreira, European Space Research and Technology Ctr. (Netherlands)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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BEaTriX, the Beam Expander Testing X-ray facility, is operated by the INAF-Brera Astronomical Observatory in Merate (Italy) as ground support equipment for the verification phase in the context of NewAthena. The facility is very compact but, thanks to an innovative optical design based on asymmetrical cut crystals associated with a paraboloidal mirror, can produce an expanded low divergence X-ray beam at the two monochromatic energies of 4.51 keV and 1.49 keV. The first beamline at 4.51 keV is already operational, as the commissioning was completed in Q12023. The second beamline at 1.49 keV energy has more challenging aspects from both design and implementation points of view: the monochromator stage is made with two Quartz crystals with asymmetric cut; the expansion phase is made by two ADP crystals also with asymmetric cut; the X-ray source needs to be very brilliant) due to the large fraction of photons rejected by the crystals. This paper describes the activities on going: the 4.51 keV X-ray beamline optimization and the tests performed on a coated MM will be presented, the implementation of the 1.49 keV components, and the comparison with other X-ray testing facilities.
13093-181
Author(s): Sara Svendsen, Desiree D. M. Ferreira, Sonny Massahi, Diego Paredes Sanz, Nis Christian Gellert, Arne S. Jegers, Finn E. Christensen, DTU Space (Denmark); Aniket Thete, Boris Landgraf, Maximilien J. Collon, cosine measurement systems (Netherlands); Dieter Skroblin, Levent Cibik, Christian Gollwitzer, Michael Krumrey, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (Germany); Ivo Ferreira, Marcos Bavdaz, European Space Agency (Netherlands)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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Development and qualification of X-ray reflective mirror coatings for the NewAthena mission is progressing with a focus on enabling the scientific capabilities of the telescope, given the new constraints of the redefined mission. In this work, we consider both design and development of Ir/C multilayer coatings optimised to ensure the required performance across the spectral range, facilitating the mission science objectives. We present the demonstration of manufacturing capability for the optimised Ir/C multilayer coatings, and compatibility with the SPO technology. Characterisation of X-ray mirror coatings is performed using X-ray reflectometry with a focus on mirror design qualification and long-term stability assessment.
13093-182
Author(s): Arne Jegers, Desiree D. M. Ferreira, DTU Space (Denmark); Erik B. Bergbäck Knudsen, DTU Space (Denmark), Copenhagen Atomics A/S (Denmark); Sonny Massahi, Sara Svendsen, Nis Christian Gellert, Diego Paredes Sanz, Bruno N. Menezes, DTU Space (Denmark); Giorgia Sironi, Daniele Spiga, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy); Ivo Ferreira, Marcos Bavdaz, European Space Agency (Netherlands)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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NewATHENA’s mirror assembly uses Silicon Pore Optics technology. It is important to assess and confirm the latest mirror design’s ability to meet the mission’s science goals. This study performs ray-tracing simulations of NewATHENA’s updated SPO mirror assembly using the ray-tracing tool SPORT. The optics are illuminated by distant point sources at a range of energies and incidence angles corresponding to the mission’s science goals. The simulated mirror surfaces use the reflective properties of the most up-to-date thin film coating recipes for the mission. The results of the simulations are presented as figures for the effective area and angular resolution of the optics at each simulated energy and angle.
13093-183
Author(s): Nicolas M. Barrière, Luis Abalo, Maximilien J. Collon, Laurens Keek, Giuseppe Vacanti, cosine measurement systems (Netherlands)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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We present a concept of hard X-ray telescope that could realistically reach angular resolution of arc- second level. The optics is based on Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) configuration realized with Silicon Pore Optics (SPO) technology. SPO has been developed for 15 years at cosine (The Netherlands) for the European Space Agency's next generation large X-ray telescope, NewAthena. It provides all the elements to realise a high-angular-resolution KB optics. In this configuration the plates only need a slight meridional curvature and are flat in the sagittal direction, which reduces drastically the stress they undergo, and consequently the formation of slope errors. SPO is well suited for KB configuration as the ribs running along the plates block efficiently stray light. Without sagittal curvature, the KB mirror modules can be designed for the very small grazing incidence required for reflectivity at high energies. This type of telescope could be well suited for solar physics or astrophysics as a complement to NewAthena.
13093-184
Author(s): Dervis Vernani, Media Lario S.r.l. (Italy); Marta Maria Civitani, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy)
17 June 2024 • 17:30 - 19:00 Japan Standard Time | Room G5, North - 1F
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Several hundreds of Silicon Pore Optics (SP