2018 Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference
Washington State Convention Center
Seattle, Washington, United States
4 - 6 April 2018
Conference SSE8
Policy, Management, and Regulations
Wednesday - Friday, 4 - 6 April 2018 Conference Committee
Important Dates
Abstract Due:
15 December 2017

Author Notification:
15 January 2018

Manuscript Due Date:
15 January 2018
Not Applicable for Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference

Wednesday 4 April Show All Abstracts
Welcome and Opening Event
Wednesday, 4 April 2018
8:45 AM - 11:45 AM
Location: Ballroom
Session 1.1: European Green Crab in the Salish Sea: Background, Status, Threats and Controls
Wednesday, 4 April 2018
1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Location: 611

Aggressive, adaptable and highly invasive, the European green crab (EGC) has established populations on the US and Canadian East and West Coasts with documented disruption of coastal habitats and shellfish harvests. Fisheries and Oceans Canada documented the first Salish Sea population in 2012, prompting renewed efforts for early detection in inland marine waters. Panelists will provide information on the current status of EGC in the Salish Sea, will present oceanographic modeling and genomics evidence to better understand potential source populations for Salish Sea green crab and will provide synopses of our current understanding of green crab impacts and control efforts. The session will provide a foundation for the following session, which will focus on trans boundary management of EGC.

Panel Speakers:
Emily Grason, Washington Sea Grant
Carolyn Tepolt, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Elizabeth Brasseale, University of Washington
Brett Howard, Simon Fraser University
Catherine de Rivera, Portland State University
Session 1.2.A: Addressing European Green Crab in the Salish Sea: A Rare Opportunity for International Collaboration Toward Effective Aquatic Invasive Species Control and Prevention
Wednesday, 4 April 2018
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Location: 611

Sessions 1.2.A and 1.2.B run concurrently.

The first Salish Sea population of the invasive European green crab was identified in 2012 near Victoria, BC. Since that time, Fisheries and Oceans Canada has been monitoring for green crab in Canadian waters and an early detection program has been established in Washington, leading to detection of and response to limited numbers of green crab at three additional sites in 2016 and 2017. Successful early detection and rapid response are rare in aquatic invasive species management and the current situation offers a unique opportunity to collaborate across the border to reduce the risk of impact from European green crab on Salish Sea habitats and resources. The motivations, barriers and opportunities for collaboration, as well as the current state of scientific understanding, will be explored to characterize the current situation and develop ideas and proposals to address the threat from European green crab. The timing and goals of the 2018 Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference are ideal to facilitate and enhance efforts at collaboration, planning and engagement. The proposed approach will include brief panelist statements, a question & discussion period and closing remarks.

Format
  • Introduction (5 minutes)
  • Brief panelist statements (5 minutes each panelist)
  • Questions to Panelists & Discussion (50 min) (Exploring paths forward with transboundary collaboration for effective control)
  • Wrap up (5 min)
  • Invited panelist organizations: Office of the Governor of Washington State, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, BC Ministry of Environment & Climate Change, Puget Sound Partnership Leadership Council, First Nations of British Columbia, Washington Tribes, Pacific Coast Shellfish Growers, and US Fish and Wildlife Service.
Session 1.2.B: Towards Resilience Through a Socio-Ecological Paradigm
Wednesday, 4 April 2018
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Location: 618

Sessions 1.2.A and 1.2.B run concurrently.

The purpose of this session is to explore how ecosystem managers are applying resilience concepts in the day-to-day management of people and natural resources. An extensive scientific literature elaborates on resilience concepts, definitions, strategic planning, and potential for adaptive learning in socio ecological systems, but little information exists on how these concepts are being applied practically. This may be because 1) the concept has not yet taken root in day-to-day ecosystem management, 2) ecosystem managers have not published what they are doing, or 3) it is a useful conceptual framework but it cannot really be applied practically. In this session, we hope to explore practical examples of the successes and lessons learned from applying resilience approaches, such as 1) how resilience is being measured and monitored, 2) how resilience metrics are being communicated, and 3) applied examples of where resilience analyses have been useful in solving complex, adaptive problems leading to ecosystem recovery. This is a topic that integrates across biophysical and social sciences and policy and we encourage participation from diverse perspectives.

Panel Speakers:
Clare Ryan, Univ. of Washington
Jamie Donatuto, Swinomish Indian Tribal Community
Karen Mitchell, Swinomish Indian Tribal Community
Todd Mitchell, Swinomish Indian Tribal Community
Thayne Yazzie, Northwest Indian College
Larry Campbell, Swinomish Indian Tribal Community
Sonni Tadlock, Swinomish Indian Tribal Community
Thursday 5 April Show All Abstracts
Billy Frank Jr. Plenary Session
Thursday, 5 April 2018
8:30 AM - 9:30 AM
Location: Ballroom
Session 2.1: Beyond theory: The Assessment and Management of Cumulative Effects in the Salish Sea
Thursday, 5 April 2018
10:00 AM - 11:15 AM
Location: 618

The Salish Sea is increasingly affected by the interaction of local, regional, and global stressors, necessitating the consideration of cumulative effects at various spatial scales and for a variety of assessment purposes. Some of these stressors are a legacy of historical activities while others reflect ongoing and emerging ocean uses. Cumulative effects frameworks for assessing risks and impacts of stressors abound but are easier to critique than to execute. Users of cumulative effects frameworks have different foci, needs, and preferred outputs that fall under four categories of cumulative effect frameworks depending on the focus of the assessment: species, stressor, activity, or place. Alternatively, or perhaps within the four-category system, frameworks have focussed on ecological units such as habitats, communities, or ecosystems, and/or were specifically developed for coupled human-natural systems. Presentations will feature applications of cumulative effects frameworks, case studies, and management efforts. The session will consist of five presentations followed by a panel discussion session on the future needs of cumulative effects research and management in the Salish Sea, with an emphasis on opportunities for transboundary collaborations.
Joint-development of the Pacific region OPP coastal environmental baseline program
Paper SSE8-36
Author(s):
Show Abstract
Cumulative effects of marine shipping
Paper SSE8-371
Author(s):
Show Abstract
Pre-contact baseline ecological reconstruction in Burrard Inlet
Paper SSE8-164
Author(s):
Show Abstract
Lessons from cumulative effects assessment and management initiatives on the North Pacific Coast of British Columbia
Paper SSE8-236
Author(s):
Show Abstract
Ten years of restoration and protection in Puget Sound: What's the impact on salmon?
Paper SSE8-221
Author(s):
Show Abstract
Poster Session and Lunch
Thursday, 5 April 2018
11:30 AM - 1:30 PM
Location: Ballroom

Posters will be on display for the entire conference, starting Wednesday, April 4 at 9:00 a.m. through Friday, April 6, at 1:30 p.m. Posters will be grouped according to the topic/track they address. Poster presenters will be available to informally discuss their study or project/program with conference participants at the Poster Session, which will be held during lunch on Thursday, April 5, between 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Session 2.2: Policy and Management Challenges for Restoring and Protecting Water Quality in the Salish Sea
Thursday, 5 April 2018
1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Location: 618

Protecting and improving Salish Sea water quality faces many challenges to which we must adapt current policies and management approaches. Among them are growing and persistent toxic threats, continual water quality degradation pressures, and new and emerging science that refines our understanding of the challenges. As water quality issues become more complex, it is increasingly important that we emphasize collaborative and creative approaches to reduce and eliminate pollution pressures. This session includes Washington and British Columbia examples of how collaboration and emerging science is used to inform local, state, and provincial policies and decisions that will drive actions to improve Salish Sea water quality and ecological health.
Going up the production stream to protect the Salish Sea
Paper SSE8-20
Author(s):
Show Abstract
Data and industrial stormwater general permit benchmarks; what we know
Paper SSE8-500
Author(s):
Show Abstract
Changes to Washington State's recreational use criteria and implications for surface waters
Paper SSE8-451
Author(s):
Show Abstract
Raising the standards for water quality objectives in Burrard Inlet: interaction between public, ecological and cultural values through Indigenous-Provincial collaboration
Paper SSE8-339
Author(s):
Show Abstract
The Clarks Creek TMDL dispute resolution agreement plan: advancing the use of model based analysis to demonstrate reasonable assurance in WA State
Paper SSE8-27
Author(s):
Show Abstract
Puget Sound no discharge zone for vessel sewage
Paper SSE8-29
Author(s):
Show Abstract
Session 2.3: The 30-year History of the  Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference: Where We Started, Where We've Been, and Where We May Be Going
Thursday, 5 April 2018
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Location: 618

Evolving from the first "annual" Puget Sound research meeting, convened in spring 1988, the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference has grown into a biennial gathering that is the centerpiece of transboundary collaboration to protect and restore the Salish Sea and its watersheds. Panelists will explore how this event has been shaped by the region's changing institutional arrangements and how this event can shape cross-system collaborations into the future. Sheri Tonn (Pacific Lutheran University) and Usha Varanasi (NOAA Fisheries, retired) will lead a discussion of the work from the early 1980’s up through 1988’s final report from the Committee on Research in Puget Sound. This conversation will help us remember what the 1988 conference addressed, who it engaged, and what participants imagined would develop for Puget Sound science and a recurring conference. Andrea Copping (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) and Richard Beamish (Department of Fisheries and Oceans, retired) will lead a discussion of the work and meetings of the 1994 marine science panel and the synthesis product, "Review of the marine environment and biota of the Strait of Georgia, Puget Sound and Juan de Fuca Strait." This discussion will offer an opportunity to review the marine science panel’s projections of “current trends” and “optimal future” shared waters conditions in 2014. This conversation will reflect on the transboundary work that developed under the auspices of the Puget Sound/Georgia Basin International Task Force (of the ECC) and Environment Canada’s Georgia Basin Action Plan. In the final portion of this session, Bert Webber (Western Washington University), Ian Perry (Department of Fisheries and Oceans), and Joe Gaydos (Sea Doc Society) will discuss the transition over the past eight conferences to a focus on the (recently named) Salish Sea. We'll conclude the panel with a discussion among panelists and session participants in future directions for the conference and transboundary collaborations.

Panel Speakers:
Sheri Tonn, Pacific Lutheran University
Usha Varanasi, NOAA Fisheries, retired
Andrea Copping, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Richard Beamish, Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Bert Webber, Western Washington University
Ian Perry, Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Joe Gaydos, Sea Doc Society
Friday 6 April Show All Abstracts
Session 3.1: Enforcing Ecological Protections: Challenges and Opportunities
Friday, 6 April 2018
8:30 AM - 9:30 AM
Location: 618

Effective enforcement of environmental protections is critical for preserving the ecological bounty of the Salish Sea. When legislators create those laws, they assume that they will be implemented consistently and fairly and that enforcement will set a baseline for behavioral expectations. However, enforcement efforts can encounter multiple challenges, including funding shortfalls, a lack of adequate monitoring for violations, a clear and predictable enforcement process managed by a lead agency, a lack of political will, or accountability for decision makers who decline to enforce manifest violations. This session will explore different enforcement challenges through the lens of individual case studies and compliance reviews, and will foster a conversation about potential options for overcoming them. It offers perspectives from both Canada and the U.S. and from non-profit organizations and governmental agencies. It will also provide time for audience discussion after the presentations. Participants should leave the discussion with a better understanding of potential enforcement pitfalls and with ideas for sidestepping them.
Enforcement discretion and best practices for enforcement
Paper SSE8-599
Author(s):
Show Abstract
The WRIA 9 marine shoreline monitoring and compliance project phase 2
Paper SSE8-352
Author(s):
Show Abstract
Nature's scorecard: how Puget Sound municipalities are incorporating low impact development
Paper SSE8-577
Author(s):
Show Abstract
Monitoring and enforcement of laws and policies in Canada: the bad, the ugly and how we can get to good
Paper SSE8-519
Author(s):
Show Abstract
Session 3.2: Exploring Best Practices in Ecosystem Services Valuation
Friday, 6 April 2018
10:30 AM - 12:00 PM
Location: 618

This session will provide expert guidance on the use and best practices associated with ecosystem services valuation. Speakers will provide contextual examples from literature and practical application. We will explore the diverse form and function of ecosystem services valuation as a concept within the social sciences, with participants asked to answer key questions, including: 1) What does current scientific thinking tell us about the preferred methodologies and analyses for ecosystem services valuation?; 2) When is monetizing ecosystem services appropriate, and what caveats should be applied to these approaches?; 3) Under what circumstances would use of the benefit transfer method be useful and appropriate?; and 4) What tools are considered most robust for both monetized and non-monetized valuation approaches? Speakers will offer case study examples to illustrate where and how different ecosystem services valuation methodologies have been applied, focusing on specific suggestions for practitioners at the local and regional levels. A panel discussion will follow: Dr. Leif Anderson, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Dr. Sara Jo Breslow, University of Washington Center for Creative Conservation, Prof. Kai Chan, University of British Columbia, and Ms. Maya Kocian, Earth Economics.

Panel Speakers:
Leif Anderson, Northwest Fisheries Science Ctr.
Sara Jo Breslow, University of Washington
Kai Chan, The Univ. of British Columbia
Maya Kocian, Earth Economics
Session 3.3.A: Marine Protected Areas and Marine Spatial Planning: Challenges and Opportunities for Large-scale Ecosystem Protection and Integrated Management in the Salish Sea
Friday, 6 April 2018
1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Location: 611

The Salish Sea is an area of outstanding biodiversity, productivity and ecological value. It is home to endangered killer whales, globally significant salmon and herring spawning runs, prehistoric glass sponge reefs, kelp forests and eelgrass meadows. The Salish Sea has long supported First Nations and Tribes, and coastal communities, providing food, cultural, spiritual and economic services, as well as a host of other ecosystem services. However the Salish Sea is at risk. Situated between the major municipalities and ports of Vancouver, Victoria, and Seattle, the Salish Sea is under increasing pressure from industrial and commercial use and coastal development, on top of climate change and acidification. MPAs are a well-established conservation strategy, employed around the world to protect important marine species and ecosystems and support the recovery of declining populations. Canada has committed to substantially surpassing the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity Aichi Target 11 to protect 10% of its ocean by 2020. The USA has made similar commitments to MPA establishment. Marine spatial planning seeks to engage marine users and stakeholders in the development of integrated and comprehensive management plans for large ocean areas. MPAs are an important output of marine spatial planning but the broader goal is to prevent siloed resource management to ensure a well-managed, sustainably used ocean with high levels of stakeholder engagement and buy in. MPAs and MSP also raise the need to address co-management and co-governance with First Nations and Tribes to ensure equitable management of marine resources. Both Canada and the USA have taken measures to move beyond MPAs to establish strategic networks of MPAs and to begin MSP processes. This session will explore existing and proposed opportunities for MPAs and MSP in the Salish Sea, the challenges that these processes may face, and what can be learned from successful and unsuccessful processes elsewhere in Canada and the USA.
Washington's aquatic reserves: strategic direction, stewardship, and supporting science
Paper SSE8-30
Author(s):
Show Abstract
Identifying areas of high conservation value in Howe Sound to strengthen regional marine spatial planning
Paper SSE8-191
Author(s):
Show Abstract
Marine protected areas and the role of ENGOs in supporting MPA establishment within the Salish Sea
Paper SSE8-410
Author(s):
Show Abstract
Extractive activities in marine protected areas: moving the bar
Paper SSE8-572
Author(s):
Show Abstract
Challenges and opportunities for marine spatial planning in the Salish Sea: learning from other jurisdictions
Paper SSE8-349
Author(s):
Show Abstract
Session 3.3.B: The Assessment and Management of Wood Waste in the Aquatic Environment
Friday, 6 April 2018
1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Location: 618

Historical and current log booming and wood processing operations have resulted in woody debris accumulation in our waterways. Woody debris and wood waste can adversely affect sediment and water quality, and the ability of benthic organisms and infauna to use these areas. The potential effects are not well understood and can vary considerably. There are currently limited standards and guidelines specific to the assessment, management and disposal of wood waste affected sediment and there are limited economically viable options for their disposal. There is also a desire to explore alternative remedial options and restore areas that have been historically impacted to increase habitat value and productivity. As such, management of wood waste impacted sites is an emerging issue that crosses boundaries and warrants further consideration.

The purpose of this session is to bring together interested parties across the Salish Sea to present their challenges, opportunities, solutions and “lessons learned” related to assessing, managing, disposing and/or restoring wood waste impacted sites.
Turning the ship: a new direction for managing wood waste in the Salish Sea of Washington State
Paper SSE8-89
Author(s):
Show Abstract
Wood waste remediation at sediment cleanup sites in Washington State: lessons learned after 20 years of cleanup
Paper SSE8-79
Author(s):
Show Abstract
Is natural recovery occurring at historic log storage sites in Howe Sound?
Paper SSE8-295
Author(s):
Show Abstract
New wood waste standard operating procedures for Canadian disposal at sea program
Paper SSE8-556
Author(s):
Show Abstract
Alternatives to disposing dredged wood waste at sea
Paper SSE8-545
Author(s):
Show Abstract
Wood waste assessment, characterization, and remediation in Esquimalt Harbour
Paper SSE8-596
Author(s):
Show Abstract
Conference Committee
Back to Top
PREMIUM CONTENT
Sign in to read the full article
Create a free SPIE account to get access to
premium articles and original research
Forgot your username?
close_icon_gray