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Proceedings Paper

Polar decomposition applied to light back-scattering by erythrocyte suspensions
Author(s): Xue-zhen Wang; Li-juan Yang; Jian-cheng Lai; Zhen-hua Li
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Paper Abstract

In this paper, polarization property of RBCs was discussed by polar decomposition. Experimental results were compared with a three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation for the erythrocyte suspensions with the same concentration. And there is a good agreement for both experimental and simulative results. Furthermore, Mueller matrices were measured for erythrocyte suspensions with different concentration under 10%, in this condition light coherent phenomena can be ignored. Using polar decomposition, the conclusion comes out that degree of polarization (DOP) and diattenuator for erythrocyte suspensions decrease with increasing concentration. Because when suspension concentration increases, scattering coefficient will be changed increasingly simultaneously and DOP and diattenuator decreases with added scattering times. These results will be referred as useful information for noninvasive diagnosis of blood.

Paper Details

Date Published: 22 August 2011
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 8192, International Symposium on Photoelectronic Detection and Imaging 2011: Laser Sensing and Imaging; and Biological and Medical Applications of Photonics Sensing and Imaging, 81924T (22 August 2011); doi: 10.1117/12.899649
Show Author Affiliations
Xue-zhen Wang, Nanjing Univ. of Science and Technology (China)
Li-juan Yang, Nanjing Univ. of Science and Technology (China)
Jian-cheng Lai, Nanjing Univ. of Science and Technology (China)
Zhen-hua Li, Nanjing Univ. of Science and Technology (China)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8192:
International Symposium on Photoelectronic Detection and Imaging 2011: Laser Sensing and Imaging; and Biological and Medical Applications of Photonics Sensing and Imaging
Farzin Amzajerdian; Weibiao Chen; Chunqing Gao; Tianyu Xie, Editor(s)

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