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Proceedings Paper

Development of the 4D Phantom for patient-specific end-to-end radiation therapy QA
Author(s): K. Malinowski; C. Noel; W. Lu; K. Lechleiter; J. Hubenschmidt; D. Low; P. Parikh M.D.
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Paper Abstract

In many patients respiratory motion causes motion artifacts in CT images, thereby inhibiting precise treatment planning and lowering the ability to target radiation to tumors. The 4D Phantom, which includes a 3D stage and a 1D stage that each are capable of arbitrary motion and timing, was developed to serve as an end-to-end radiation therapy QA device that could be used throughout CT imaging, radiation therapy treatment planning, and radiation therapy delivery. The dynamic accuracy of the system was measured with a camera system. The positional error was found to be equally likely to occur in the positive and negative directions for each axis, and the stage was within 0.1 mm of the desired position 85% of the time. In an experiment designed to use the 4D Phantom's encoders to measure trial-to-trial precision of the system, the 4D Phantom reproduced the motion during variable bag ventilation of a transponder that had been bronchoscopically implanted in a canine lung. In this case, the encoder readout indicated that the stage was within 10 microns of the sent position 94% of the time and that the RMS error was 7 microns. Motion artifacts were clearly visible in 3D and respiratory-correlated (4D) CT scans of phantoms reproducing tissue motion. In 4D CT scans, apparent volume was found to be directly correlated to instantaneous velocity. The system is capable of reproducing individual patient-specific tissue trajectories with a high degree of accuracy and precision and will be useful for end-to-end radiation therapy QA.

Paper Details

Date Published: 16 March 2007
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 6510, Medical Imaging 2007: Physics of Medical Imaging, 65100E (16 March 2007); doi: 10.1117/12.713841
Show Author Affiliations
K. Malinowski, Washington Univ. School of Medicine (United States)
C. Noel, Washington Univ. School of Medicine (United States)
W. Lu, Washington Univ. School of Medicine (United States)
K. Lechleiter, Washington Univ. School of Medicine (United States)
J. Hubenschmidt, Washington Univ. School of Medicine (United States)
D. Low, Washington Univ. School of Medicine (United States)
P. Parikh M.D., Washington Univ. School of Medicine (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6510:
Medical Imaging 2007: Physics of Medical Imaging
Jiang Hsieh; Michael J. Flynn, Editor(s)

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