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Proceedings Paper

In vivo detecting matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity by a genetically engineered fluorescent probe
Author(s): Jie Yang; Zhihong Zhang; Ting Su; Qingming Luo
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Paper Abstract

Degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) enhances tumor invasion and metastasis. To monitor MMP activity, we constructed plasmid that encoded a fluorescent sensor DC, in which an MMP substrate site (MSS) is sandwiched between DsRed2 and ECFP. MMPs are secretory proteins, only acting on the outside of cells; hence, an expressing vector was used that displayed the fluorescent sensor on the cellular surface. The DC was expressed in cells with high secretory MMP, so MSS was cleaved by MMP. Also, GM6001, an MMP inhibitor, causes DsRed2 signals to increase in living cells and on the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Thus, this fluorescent sensor was able to sensitively monitor MMP activation in vivo. Potential applications for this sensor include high-throughput screening for MMP inhibitors for anti-cancer research, and detailed analysis of the effects of MMP inhibitors.

Paper Details

Date Published: 3 February 2007
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 6449, Genetically Engineered and Optical Probes for Biomedical Applications IV, 644919 (3 February 2007); doi: 10.1117/12.701627
Show Author Affiliations
Jie Yang, Huazhong Univ. of Science and Technology (China)
Zhihong Zhang, Huazhong Univ. of Science and Technology (China)
Ting Su, Huazhong Univ. of Science and Technology (China)
Qingming Luo, Huazhong Univ. of Science and Technology (China)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 6449:
Genetically Engineered and Optical Probes for Biomedical Applications IV
Samuel Achilefu; Alexander Pavlovich Savitsky; Rebekka M. Wachter; Darryl J. Bornhop; Ramesh Raghavachari, Editor(s)

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