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Proceedings Paper

DNA-based materials for electro-optic applications: current status
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Paper Abstract

Purified deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), derived from salmon milt and roe sacs, waste products of the Japanese fishing industry in Hokkaido, has been processed into a promising, optical waveguide quality, biopolymer material suitable for both passive and active optical and electro-optic applications. Intercalation of aromatic compounds into stacked layers within the double helix of DNA molecules has rendered active optical waveguide materials with excellent nonlinear optical properties.

Paper Details

Date Published: 18 August 2005
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 5934, Nonlinear Optical Transmission and Multiphoton Processes in Organics III, 593406 (18 August 2005); doi: 10.1117/12.615206
Show Author Affiliations
James G. Grote, Air Force Research Lab. (United States)
Emily M. Heckman, Univ. of Dayton (United States)
Anteon Corp. (United States)
Darnell E. Diggs, Air Force Research Lab. (United States)
Joshua A. Hagen, Univ. of Cincinnati (United States)
Perry P. Yaney, Univ. of Dayton (United States)
Andrew J. Steckl, Univ. of Cincinnati (United States)
Stephen J. Clarson, Univ. of Cincinnati (United States)
Guang S. He, State Univ. of New York at Buffalo (United States)
Qingdong Zheng, State Univ. of New York at Buffalo (United States)
Paras N. Prasad, State Univ. of New York at Buffalo (United States)
John S. Zetts, Air Force Research Lab. (United States)
F. Kenneth Hopkins, Air Force Research Lab. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 5934:
Nonlinear Optical Transmission and Multiphoton Processes in Organics III
A. Todd Yeates, Editor(s)

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