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Proceedings Paper

Active mirror technology for large space telescopes
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Paper Abstract

Future space telescopes rely on advances in technology to enable fabrication of primary mirrors with orders of magnitude more area, yet similar mass as current mirrors. This requires a shift of paradigm from the concept of the mirror as a rigid, stable unit, to the idea of the mirror as a system that uses active control to maintain the figure of a flexible surface. We discuss issues for this new class of optics and present status on a 2-m prototype mirror for NGST.

Paper Details

Date Published: 28 July 2000
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 4013, UV, Optical, and IR Space Telescopes and Instruments, (28 July 2000); doi: 10.1117/12.393999
Show Author Affiliations
James H. Burge, Optical Sciences Ctr./Univ. of Arizona and Steward Observatory/Univ. of Arizona (United States)
Brian Cuerden, Steward Observatory/Univ. of Arizona (United States)
James Roger P. Angel, Steward Observatory/Univ. of Arizona (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4013:
UV, Optical, and IR Space Telescopes and Instruments
James B. Breckinridge; Peter Jakobsen, Editor(s)

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