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Proceedings Paper

Development of 200-channel mapping system for tissue oxygenation measured by near-infrared spectroscopy
Author(s): Masatsugu Niwayama; Daisuke Kohata; Jun Shao; Nobuki Kudo; Takatumi Hamaoka; Toshihito Katsumura; Katsuyuki Yamamoto
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Paper Abstract

Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a very useful technique for noninvasive measurement of tissue oxygenation. Among various methods of NIRS, continuous wave near-infrared spectroscopy (CW- NIRS) is especially suitable for real-time measurement and for practical use. CW-NIRS has recently been applied in vivo reflectance imaging of muscle oxygenation and brain activity. However, conventional mapping systems do not have a sufficient mapping area at present. Moreover, they do not enable quantitative measurement of tissue oxygenation because conventional NIRS is based on the inappropriate assumption that tissue is homogeneous. In this study, we developed a 200-channel mapping system that enables measurement of changes in oxygenation and blood volume and that covers a wider area (30 cm x 20 cm) than do conventional systems. The spatial resolution (source- detector separation) of this system is 15 mm. As for the effcts of tissue inhomogeneity on muscle oxygenation measurement, subcutaneous adipose tissue greatly reduces measurement sensitivity. Therefore, we also used a correction method for influence of the subcutaneous fat layer so that we could obtain quantitative changes in concentrations of oxy- and deoxy- hemoglobin. We conducted exercise tests and measured the changed in hemoglobin concentration in the thigh using the new system. The working muscles in the exercises could be imaged, and the heterogeneity of the muscles was shown. These results demonstrated the new 200-channel mapping system enables observation of the distribution of muscle metabolism and localization of muscle function.

Paper Details

Date Published: 4 July 2000
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 4082, Optical Sensing, Imaging, and Manipulation for Biological and Biomedical Applications, (4 July 2000); doi: 10.1117/12.390566
Show Author Affiliations
Masatsugu Niwayama, Hokkaido Univ. (Japan)
Daisuke Kohata, Hokkaido Univ. (Japan)
Jun Shao, Hokkaido Univ. (United States)
Nobuki Kudo, Hokkaido Univ. (Japan)
Takatumi Hamaoka, Tokyo Medical College (Japan)
Toshihito Katsumura, Tokyo Medical College (Japan)
Katsuyuki Yamamoto, Hokkaido Univ. (Japan)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4082:
Optical Sensing, Imaging, and Manipulation for Biological and Biomedical Applications
Robert R. Alfano; Peng Pei Ho; Arthur E. T. Chiou, Editor(s)

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