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Proceedings Paper

Performance characteristics of a low-temperature cell for collisional cooling experiments
Author(s): Christopher D. Ball; Frank C. De Lucia; Dipesh Risal; Alan Ruch; Hua Sheng; Yilma Abebe; Paula A. Farina; Arlan W. Mantz
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Paper Abstract

We fabricated and tested a low temperature cell which is mounted directly on the second stage of a CTI-Cryogenics Model 22C CRYODYNE CRYOCOOLER. The vacuum system consists of a room temperature vacuum shroud, a radiation shield maintained at 77K and the cell which is mounted directly to the second stage of the cryocooler. The ultimate cell temperature is 12.4 Kelvin, and the low temperature limit increases at a rate of 5.6 Kelvin/Watt. We achieve a cell temperature of 22 Kelvin under typical experimental conditions of approximately 29 milli Torr helium, slow flowing gas, and a heated injector. The absorption path length of the cell is 3.35 cm, and the window clear aperture is 1.27 cm. We preformed a series of experiments in which we determined the translational temperatures of vibration- rotation transitions in the band of CO for different cell temperatures. The results of our tests are discussed in this paper.

Paper Details

Date Published: 21 October 1996
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 2834, Application of Tunable Diode and Other Infrared Sources for Atmospheric Studies and Industrial Process Monitoring, (21 October 1996); doi: 10.1117/12.255315
Show Author Affiliations
Christopher D. Ball, The Ohio State Univ. (United States)
Frank C. De Lucia, The Ohio State Univ. (United States)
Dipesh Risal, Franklin and Marshall College (United States)
Alan Ruch, Franklin and Marshall College (United States)
Hua Sheng, Franklin and Marshall College (United States)
Yilma Abebe, Connecticut College (United States)
Paula A. Farina, Connecticut College (United States)
Arlan W. Mantz, Connecticut College (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2834:
Application of Tunable Diode and Other Infrared Sources for Atmospheric Studies and Industrial Process Monitoring
Alan Fried, Editor(s)

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