Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Addressing metallic contaminants in the photochemical supply chain
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $17.00 $21.00

Paper Abstract

Metal contaminants are notorious yield detractors throughout semiconductor unit processes. Metallic contaminants can create small, hard-to-detect defects that can eventually result in cone defects and gate leakage. Because these contaminants are so hard to detect, it is extremely difficult to pinpoint their root cause and identify opportunities to remove them. Clean photochemicals experience many contamination opportunities between their final quality control checks at the end of manufacturing and dispense onto a wafer. The complexity of the interactions of metal contaminants and the components in photochemicals is an important consideration when designing removal methods. This challenge increases when metaloxide photoresists are introduced into high volume manufacturing, whereby metals that enhance etch resistance must remain in the formulation, while specific metal contaminants must be removed. In this paper, we will describe different types of metal contaminants in photochemicals and raw materials, review how these contaminants are removed using membrane-based technologies, and define new methodologies to better target metal in photochemicals.

Paper Details

Date Published: 23 March 2020
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 11326, Advances in Patterning Materials and Processes XXXVII, 1132613 (23 March 2020);
Show Author Affiliations
Jad A. Jaber, Entegris, Inc. (United States)
James Hamzik, Entegris, Inc. (United States)
Nicholas Filipancic, Entegris, Inc. (United States)
Justin Brewster, Entegris, Inc. (United States)
Annie Xia, Entegris, Inc. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 11326:
Advances in Patterning Materials and Processes XXXVII
Roel Gronheid; Daniel P. Sanders, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top
PREMIUM CONTENT
Sign in to read the full article
Create a free SPIE account to get access to
premium articles and original research
Forgot your username?
close_icon_gray