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Proceedings Paper

Adaptively variable frame-rate fluoroscopy with an ultra-fast digital x-ray tube based on carbon nanotube field electron emitters
Author(s): Jeong-Woong Lee; Jin-Woo Jeong; Sora Park; Jae-Woo Kim; Jun-Tae Kang; Ki Nam Yun; Eunsol Go; Hyojin Jeon; Yujung Ahn; Ji-Hwan Yeon; Sunghee Kim; Yoon-Ho Song
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Paper Abstract

Fluoroscopy is a radiological technique that provides real-time x-ray viewing in interventional and angiographic procedures. In fluoroscopic procedures, there are several issues have to be solved, such as a risk of radiation exposure to the patients and operators and low image qualities by motion blur. To lower the radiation dose and motion blur, most of fluoroscopic systems provide a pulse-mode operation. However, conventional systems adopt filament-based thermionic analog x-ray tubes that generate relatively longer x-ray pulses than a few milliseconds due to intrinsic difficulty in modulating electron emissions, thus still have many problems of motion blur for fast objects, unnecessary x-ray radiation, and mismatched frame rate to the moving objects. In this work, we tried to solve these problems by suggesting an adaptively variable frame-rate fluoroscopy with an ultra-fast digital x-ray tube (DXT) based on carbon nanotube (CNT) field electron emitters.

We first fabricated a vacuum-sealed CNT DXT and its monoblock with a power generator for the fluoroscopic system. Ultra-short and high-frequency x-ray pulses of up to 500 ns at 1 MHz was achieved by the direct control of electron emission through an active current-control unit. X-ray pulse frames from the CNT DXT with a tube voltage of 120 kV and current of 20 mA were adaptively modulated in the range of 1-30 Hz according to the motion of objects, greatly improving temporal resolution with a reduced radiation dose. The adaptively variable frame-rate fluoroscopy could pave the way for both reducing x-ray doses and improving temporal and spatial resolution.

Paper Details

Date Published: 16 March 2020
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 11312, Medical Imaging 2020: Physics of Medical Imaging, 113123F (16 March 2020); doi: 10.1117/12.2549814
Show Author Affiliations
Jeong-Woong Lee, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)
Univ. of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)
Jin-Woo Jeong, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)
Sora Park, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)
Jae-Woo Kim, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)
Jun-Tae Kang, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)
Ki Nam Yun, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)
Eunsol Go, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)
Univ. of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)
Hyojin Jeon, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)
Univ. of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)
Yujung Ahn, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)
Univ. of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)
Ji-Hwan Yeon, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)
Sunghee Kim, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)
Yoon-Ho Song, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)
Univ. of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 11312:
Medical Imaging 2020: Physics of Medical Imaging
Guang-Hong Chen; Hilde Bosmans, Editor(s)

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