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Proceedings Paper

Displaying information collected by intraoral tomosynthesis as multi-view synthetic radiographs
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Paper Abstract

Purpose. Explore the potential value of displaying information collected by stationary intraoral tomosynthesis (sIOT) as multi-view synthetic radiographs, using vertical root fractures (VRFs) as a model system.

Methods. Filled and unfilled extracted tooth roots containing artificially-induced VRFs were imaged by sIOT and standard periapical radiography. sIOT collected 7 views across a 12° angle span, providing information for an image processing chain that included reconstruction, weighting, and forward projection to generate a set a synthetic two-dimensional (2D) images. Qualitative assessments of fracture conspicuity were used for comparison.

Results. The conspicuity of VRFs changed significantly with the angle of imaging, suggesting benefit to displaying a set of synthetic images across a span of viewing angles. Although high-density in-plane and out-of-plane artifacts, which could limit the conspicuity of VRFs, were prominent in the three-dimensional (3D) stack of reconstructed image slices, these artifacts were minimal in the synthetic radiographs. As such, some fractures were displayed more clearly in the synthetic 2D images compared to the reconstructed 3D image stack. Also, in some cases, the fractures were more conspicuous in the sIOT-generated synthetic images than the standard periapical radiographs.

Conclusion. Multi-view synthetic radiography can improve the display of VRFs in images generated by sIOT. As such, this approach to dental imaging may offer a useful clinical tool, with potential application to a host of imaging tasks.

Paper Details

Date Published: 16 March 2020
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 11312, Medical Imaging 2020: Physics of Medical Imaging, 113122R (16 March 2020); doi: 10.1117/12.2549417
Show Author Affiliations
Connor Puett, The Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (United States)
Christina Inscoe, The Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (United States)
Lisa Perrone, The Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (United States)
Michael Regan Anderson, Univ. of Minnesota (United States)
Laurence Gaalaas, Univ. of Minnesota (United States)
Jianping Lu, The Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (United States)
Otto Zhou, The Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 11312:
Medical Imaging 2020: Physics of Medical Imaging
Guang-Hong Chen; Hilde Bosmans, Editor(s)

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