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Proceedings Paper

Flexible piezoelectric sensor for real-time image-guided colonoscopies: a solution to endoscopic looping challenges in clinic
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Paper Abstract

Colonoscopies are routine, low-risk procedures that are used to screen patients for diseases like colorectal cancer. However, often times they are performed with moderate sedation (i.e. conscious sedation) which may result in pain for patients. With moderate sedation, these procedures can be extremely painful, with one study reporting that more than 20% of patients experienced severe pain. This pain is usually the result of a phenomenon called “endoscopic looping,” which occurs when the scope loops within the patient’s bowels and stretches out their intestines. Looping is extremely common, and can occur in up to 90% of procedures. This study reports a low-cost endoscopy visualization device aimed to decrease patient pain during colonoscopies and time lost due to complications experienced during procedures. The device consists of a flexible piezoelectric sensor to detect applied forces during looping, bending, or compression. In order to use the device, the endoscopist inserts the piezoelectric cable fully within the working channel of the colonoscope before the colonoscopy begins. The piezoelectric cable is connected to an external monitor. If extreme forces or bends are detected by the piezoelectric cable, a notification can appear on screen that a loop is forming. Once the colonoscope reaches the desired location, the endoscopist removes the piezoelectric cable, leaving the working channel open for use by other tools, such as biopsy forceps.

Paper Details

Date Published: 16 March 2020
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 11315, Medical Imaging 2020: Image-Guided Procedures, Robotic Interventions, and Modeling, 1131520 (16 March 2020); doi: 10.1117/12.2548873
Show Author Affiliations
Adam Kenet, Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States)
Eashwar Mahadevan, Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States)
Sanjay Elangovan, Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States)
Justin Yan, Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States)
Kamran Siddiq, Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States)
Simon Liu, Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States)
Amrita Ladwa, Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States)
Roshini Narayanan, Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States)
Jessica Dakkak, Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States)
Thomas Benassi, Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States)
Kenneth Ng, Dept. of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States)
Amir Manbachi, Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States)
Dept. of Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 11315:
Medical Imaging 2020: Image-Guided Procedures, Robotic Interventions, and Modeling
Baowei Fei; Cristian A. Linte, Editor(s)

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