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Proceedings Paper

In vivo high-resolution multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy of spinal cord in mice
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Paper Abstract

Chronic in vivo optical imaging of the spinal cord is an effective way to study the biological processes during and after spinal cord injury (SCI) in mouse models. It normally relies on an implanted spinal chamber to provide continuous optical access to the spinal cord. However, the chronic window consists of multiple layers of transparent materials with various optical properties and irregular thickness, which induce large optical aberration. Therefore, the image quality of multiphoton microscopy as well as the precision of femtosecond laser axotomy were dramatically degraded. In this work, we developed an adaptive optics (AO) microscope system integrating stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and twophoton excited fluorescence (TPEF). Using our system, the aberrations induced by the spinal cord window were measured and compensated accordingly, enabling both high-resolution imaging and precise laser axotomy of the mouse spinal cord.

Paper Details

Date Published: 21 February 2020
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 11252, Advanced Chemical Microscopy for Life Science and Translational Medicine, 112520P (21 February 2020); doi: 10.1117/12.2546925
Show Author Affiliations
Wanjie Wu, Hong Kong Univ. of Science and Technology (Hong Kong, China)
Zhongya Qin, Hong Kong Univ. of Science and Technology (Hong Kong, China)
Junqiang Wu, Hong Kong Univ. of Science and Technology (Hong Kong, China)
Congping Chen, Hong Kong Univ. of Science and Technology (Hong Kong, China)
Weitao Chen, Hong Kong Univ. of Science and Technology (Hong Kong, China)
Kai Liu, Hong Kong Univ. of Science and Technology (Hong Kong, China)
Jianan Y. Qu, Hong Kong Univ. of Science and Technology (Hong Kong, China)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 11252:
Advanced Chemical Microscopy for Life Science and Translational Medicine
Ji-Xin Cheng; Wei Min; Garth J. Simpson, Editor(s)

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