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Proceedings Paper

Deep UV microscopy of prostate cancer tissue
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Paper Abstract

Correctly diagnosing and staging prostate cancer continues to be a significant clinical challenge. Currently, the standard of care consists of a pathologist’s visual assessment of hematoxylin-and-eosin-stained (HE) histological sections, and designation of a Gleason score based on the top two most common patterns. However, this process is subjective and thus prone to error. Further, lack of standard protocols for staining, makes quantitative analysis of stained tissues difficult. Therefore, there is a significant need to develop new quantitative methods that can provide robust, objective, and accurate information of the aggressiveness and stage of prostate cancer. In this work, we seek to address this challenge using multi-spectral deep-UV microscopy of unstained tissue sections. This method yields valuable insight into the aggressiveness and stage of the disease due to its subcellular spatial resolution and high sensitivity to many endogenous biomolecules, including nucleic acid and proteins. In our approach we use a simple and cost effective wide-field imaging configuration with sequential illumination at multiple wavelengths ranging from 220 nm to 450 nm. Spectral signatures are analyzed in conjunction with the morphology using a geometrical representation of principal component analysis and principles of mathematical morphology. Our results reveal distinct morphological and molecular alterations in the tissue as cancer becomes more aggressive. In this presentation we will detail the design of the multispectral, deep UV microscope; describe our quantitative image analysis; and show preliminary results.

Paper Details

Date Published: 17 February 2020
PDF: 4 pages
Proc. SPIE 11243, Imaging, Manipulation, and Analysis of Biomolecules, Cells, and Tissues XVIII, 1124317 (17 February 2020); doi: 10.1117/12.2546200
Show Author Affiliations
Soheil Soltani, Georgia Institute of Technology & Emory Univ. School of Medicine (United States)
Ashkan Ojaghi, Georgia Institute of Technology & Emory Univ. School of Medicine (United States)
Atsutse Kludze, Georgia Institute of Technology (United States)
Francisco E. Robles, Georgia Institute of Technology & Emory Univ. School of Medicine (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 11243:
Imaging, Manipulation, and Analysis of Biomolecules, Cells, and Tissues XVIII
Daniel L. Farkas; Attila Tarnok, Editor(s)

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