Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

A proof-of-concept methodology to validate the in situ visualization of residual disease using cancer-targeted molecular agents in fluorescence-guided surgery
Author(s): Servando Hernandez Vargas; Christie Lin; Solmaz AghaAmiri; Julie Voss; Naruhiko Ikoma; Hop S. Tran Cao; Sukhen C. Ghosh; Adam J. Uselmann; Ali Azhdarinia
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $17.00 $21.00

Paper Abstract

Introduction: The clinical need for improved intraoperative tumor visualization has led to the development of targeted contrast agents for fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS). A key characteristic of these agents is their high tumor specificity, which could enable detection of residual lesions that would likely be missed by visual inspection. Here, we examine the utility of a promising somatostatin receptor subtype-2 (SSTR2)-targeted fluorescent agent for detecting residual disease in mouse xenografts using FGS and post-operative histopathological validation.

Methods: Mice (n=2) implanted with SSTR2 overexpressing tumors were injected with 2 nmol of the dual-labeled somatostatin analog, 67Ga-MMC(IR800)-TOC, and tumors were resected 48 h post-injection using traditional white light reflectance and palpation. Tumors underwent gamma counting and histopathology analysis. The wide-field FGS imaging platform (OnLume) was used to evaluate residual disease in situ under ambient light representative of an operating room.

Results: The tumor was resected with grossly negative margins using conventional inspection and palpation; however, additional in situ residual disease was found in the tumor cavity using FGS imaging. In situ fluorescent tumor contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were 3.0 and 5.2. Agent accumulation was 7.72 and 8.20 %ID/g in tumors and 0.27 and 0.20 %ID/g in muscle. Fluorescence pixel values and gamma counts were highly correlated (r = 0.95, P < 0.048). H&E and IHC staining confirmed cancer positivity and SSTR2-overexpression, respectively.

Conclusion: Our findings demonstrate that the use of clinically relevant fluorescence imaging instrumentation enhances the evaluation of promising FGS agents for in situ visualization of residual disease

Paper Details

Date Published: 19 February 2020
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 11222, Molecular-Guided Surgery: Molecules, Devices, and Applications VI, 112220P (19 February 2020); doi: 10.1117/12.2546190
Show Author Affiliations
Servando Hernandez Vargas, The Univ. of Texas Health Science Ctr. at Houston (United States)
Christie Lin, OnLume, Inc. (United States)
Solmaz AghaAmiri, The Univ. of Texas Health Science Ctr. at Houston (United States)
Julie Voss, The Univ. of Texas Health Science Ctr. at Houston (United States)
Naruhiko Ikoma, The Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Ctr. (United States)
Hop S. Tran Cao, The Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Ctr. (United States)
Sukhen C. Ghosh, The Univ. of Texas Health Science Ctr. at Houston (United States)
Adam J. Uselmann, OnLume, Inc. (United States)
Ali Azhdarinia, The Univ. of Texas Health Science Ctr. at Houston (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 11222:
Molecular-Guided Surgery: Molecules, Devices, and Applications VI
Sylvain Gioux; Summer L. Gibbs; Brian W. Pogue, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top
PREMIUM CONTENT
Sign in to read the full article
Create a free SPIE account to get access to
premium articles and original research
Forgot your username?
close_icon_gray