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Proceedings Paper

Toward point-of-care uropathogen detection using SERS active filters
Author(s): Simon D. Dryden; Salzitsa Anastasova; Giovanni Satta; Alex J. Thompson; Daniel R. Leff; Ara Darzi
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Paper Abstract

150 million people worldwide suffer one or more urinary tract infections (UTIs) annually. UTIs are a significant health burden: societal costs of UTI exceed $3.5 billion in the U.S. alone; 5% of sepsis cases arise from a urinary source; and UTIs are a prominent contributor toward antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Current diagnostic frameworks exacerbate this burden by providing inaccurate and delayed diagnosis. Rapid point-of-care bacterial identification will allow for early precision treatment, fundamentally altering the UTI paradigm. Raman spectroscopy has a proven ability to provide rapid bacterial identification but is limited by weak bacterial signal and a susceptibility to background fluorescence. These limitations may be overcome using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), provided close and consistent application of bacteria to the SERS-active surface can be achieved. Physical filtration provides a means of capturing uropathogens, separating them from the background solution and acting as SERS-active surface. This work demonstrates that filters can provide a means of aggregating bacteria, thereby allowing subsequent enhancement of the acquired Raman signal using metallic nanoparticles. 60 bacterial suspensions of common uropathogens were vacuum filtered onto commercial polyvinylidene fluoride membrane filters and Raman signals were enhanced by the addition of silver nanoparticles directly onto the filter surface. SERS spectra were acquired using a commercial Raman spectrometer (Ocean Optics, Inc.). Principal Component – Linear Discriminant Analysis provided discrimination of infected from control samples (accuracy: 88.75%, 95% CI: 79.22-94.59%, p-value <0.05). Amongst infected samples uropathogens were classified with 80% accuracy. This study has demonstrated that combining Raman spectroscopy with membrane filtration and SERS can provide identification of infected samples and rapid bacterial classification.

Paper Details

Date Published: 14 February 2020
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 11247, Optical Diagnostics and Sensing XX: Toward Point-of-Care Diagnostics, 1124705 (14 February 2020); doi: 10.1117/12.2545515
Show Author Affiliations
Simon D. Dryden, Imperial College London (United Kingdom)
Salzitsa Anastasova, Imperial College London (United Kingdom)
Giovanni Satta, Imperial College NHS Trust (United Kingdom)
Alex J. Thompson, Imperial College London (United Kingdom)
Daniel R. Leff, Imperial College London (United Kingdom)
Ara Darzi, Imperial College London (United Kingdom)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 11247:
Optical Diagnostics and Sensing XX: Toward Point-of-Care Diagnostics
Gerard L. Coté, Editor(s)

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