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Proceedings Paper

Optical simulations for determining efficacy of new light source designs for excitation-scanning high-speed hyperspectral imaging systems
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Paper Abstract

Positive outcomes for colorectal cancer treatment have been linked to early detection. The difficulty in detecting early lesions is the limited contrast with surrounding mucosa and minimal definitive markers to distinguish between hyperplastic and carcinoma lesions. Colorectal cancer is the 3rd leading cancer for incidence and mortality rates which is potentially linked to missed early lesions which allow for increased growth and metastatic potential. One potential technology for early-stage lesion detection is hyperspectral imaging. Traditionally, hyperspectral imaging uses reflectance spectroscopic data to provide a component analysis, per pixel, of an image in fields such as remote sensing, agriculture, food processing and archaeology. This work aims to acquire higher signal-to-noise fluorescence spectroscopic data, harnessing the autofluorescence of tissue, adding a hyperspectral contrast to colorectal cancer detection while maintaining spatial resolution at video-rate speeds. We have previously designed a multi-furcated LED-based spectral light source to prove this concept. Our results demonstrated that the technique is feasible, but the initial prototype has a high light transmission loss (~98%) minimizing spatial resolution and slowing video acquisition. Here, we present updated results in developing an optical ray-tracing model of light source geometries to maximize irradiance throughput for excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging. Results show combining solid light guide branches have a compounding light loss effect, however, there is potential to minimize light loss through the use of optical claddings. This simulation data will provide the necessary metrics to verify and validate future physical optical components within the hyperspectral endoscopic system for detecting colorectal cancer.

Paper Details

Date Published: 2 March 2020
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 11216, Multiscale Imaging and Spectroscopy, 112160W (2 March 2020); doi: 10.1117/12.2545201
Show Author Affiliations
Craig M. Browning, Univ. of South Alabama (United States)
Joshua Deal, Univ. of South Alabama (United States)
Samantha Gunn Mayes, Univ. of South Alabama (United States)
Marina Parker, Univ. of South Alabama (United States)
Thomas C. Rich, Univ. of South Alabama (United States)
Silas J. Leavesley, Univ. of South Alabama (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 11216:
Multiscale Imaging and Spectroscopy
Paul J. Campagnola; Kristen C. Maitland; Darren M. Roblyer, Editor(s)

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