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Proceedings Paper

Probing metabolic alteration of differentiating induced pluripotent stem cells using label-free FLIM
Author(s): A. Meleshina; S. Rodimova; E. Dashinimaev; A. Artyuhov; N. Mescheryakova; A. Kashina; E. Kryukov; V. Elagin; D. Reunov; E. Vorotelyak; E. Zagaynova
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Paper Abstract

The differentiation of endothelial cells from human iPSC has incontestable advantages in diseases research and therapeutic applications. However, the safe use of iPSC derivatives in regenerative medicine requires an enhanced understanding and control of factors that optimize in vitro reprogramming and differentiation protocols. Shifts in cellular metabolism associated with intracellular pH changes affect the enzymes that control epigenetic configuration, which impact chromatin reorganization and gene expression changes during reprogramming and differentiation. FLIM-based metabolic imaging of NADH and FAD is a powerful tool for measuring mitochondrial metabolic state and widely used diagnostic method for identification of neoplastic diseases, skin diseases, ocular pathologies and stem cells differentiation. Therefore, in this study, we used the potential of FLIM-based metabolic imaging and fluorescence microscopy of NADH and FAD to study the metabolic changes during iPSC differentiation in endothelial cells. The evaluation of the intracellular pH was carried out with the fluorescent pH-sensor SypHer-2 and fluorescence microscopy to obtain complete information about metabolic status of iPSC and their endothelial derivatives. Based on the FAD/NAD(P)H optical redox ratios increase and the contributions rise of the NAD(P)H fluorescence lifetime in iPSC during endothelial differentiation, we demonstrated an contribution increase of OXPHOS to cellular metabolism. Based on the shift toward more acidic intracellular pH in endothelial cell derived from iPSCs we verified their oxidative state.

Paper Details

Date Published: 17 February 2020
PDF: 13 pages
Proc. SPIE 11243, Imaging, Manipulation, and Analysis of Biomolecules, Cells, and Tissues XVIII, 112431D (17 February 2020); doi: 10.1117/12.2544821
Show Author Affiliations
A. Meleshina, Privolzhsky Research Medical Univ. (Russian Federation)
S. Rodimova, Privolzhsky Research Medical Univ. (Russian Federation)
E. Dashinimaev, Koltzov Institute of Developmental Biology (Russian Federation)
A. Artyuhov, Pirogov Russian National Research Medical Univ. (Russian Federation)
N. Mescheryakova, RUDN Univ. (Russian Federation)
A. Kashina, Privolzhsky Research Medical Univ. (Russian Federation)
E. Kryukov, Privolzhsky Research Medical Univ. (Russian Federation)
V. Elagin, Privolzhsky Research Medical Univ. (Russian Federation)
D. Reunov, Privolzhsky Research Medical Univ. (Russian Federation)
E. Vorotelyak, Koltzov Institute of Developmental Biology (Russian Federation)
Pirogov Russian National Research Medical Univ. (Russian Federation)
Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation)
E. Zagaynova, Privolzhsky Research Medical Univ. (Russian Federation)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 11243:
Imaging, Manipulation, and Analysis of Biomolecules, Cells, and Tissues XVIII
Daniel L. Farkas; Attila Tarnok, Editor(s)

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