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Proceedings Paper

Temperature influence on Er:GGAG crystal spectroscopic properties and lasing at 3 μm
Author(s): Richard Švejkar; Jan Šulc; Pavel Boháček; Michal Němec; Jan Kratochvíl; Helena Jelínková; Bohumil Trunda; Lubomír Havlák; Martin Nikl; Karel Jurek
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Paper Abstract

The spectroscopic and laser properties of Er:GGAG active medium, in temperature range from 80 K to 300 K, are presented in this work. The sample of Er:GGAG (20 at. % of Er3+) crystal had face-polished plan-parallel faces without anti-reflection coatings (thickness 3.6 mm). During all experiments the Er:GGAG was attached to temperature controlled copper holder and it was placed in a vacuum chamber. The transmission and emission spectra together with the fluorescence decay time were measured depending on temperature. The excitation of Er:GGAG was carried out by a fibre-coupled laser diode radiation (pulse duration 2 ms, repetition rate 25 Hz, wavelength 964 nm). Laser resonator was hemispherical, 100 mm in length with flat pumping mirror (HR @ 2.95 μm) and a spherical output coupler (r = 100 mm, R = 97.5 % @ 2.65 - 2.95 μm). The tunability of laser at 300 K was tested using MgF2 birefringent filter and several laser lines at several spectral bands 2800 – 2822 nm, 2829 – 2891 nm, and 2917 – 2942 nm were obtained. The fluorescence decay time of manifold 4I11/2 (upper laser level) is slightly increasing with rising temperature from 482 μs (80 K) to 466 μs (300 K) on the other hand the intensity of up-conversion radiation was increasing with decreasing temperature. In the pulsed laser regime, the highest slope efficiency with respect to absorbed energy 9 % and the maximum output energy 2.6 mJ were reached at 5 % duty cycle. The laser radiation generated by Er:GGAG laser (2.94 μm) is close to the absorption peak of water (3 μm) thus this wavelength can be used in medicine or spectroscopy.

Paper Details

Date Published: 21 February 2020
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 11259, Solid State Lasers XXIX: Technology and Devices, 112591Q (21 February 2020); doi: 10.1117/12.2541965
Show Author Affiliations
Richard Švejkar, Czech Technical Univ. in Prague (Czech Republic)
Jan Šulc, Czech Technical Univ. in Prague (Czech Republic)
Pavel Boháček, Institute of Physics of the CAS, v.v.i. (Czech Republic)
Michal Němec, Czech Technical Univ. in Prague (Czech Republic)
Jan Kratochvíl, Czech Technical Univ. in Prague (Czech Republic)
Helena Jelínková, Czech Technical Univ. in Prague (Czech Republic)
Bohumil Trunda, Institute of Physics of the CAS, v.v.i. (Czech Republic)
Lubomír Havlák, Institute of Physics of the CAS, v.v.i. (Czech Republic)
Martin Nikl, Institute of Physics of the CAS, v.v.i. (Czech Republic)
Karel Jurek, Institute of Physics of the CAS, v.v.i. (Czech Republic)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 11259:
Solid State Lasers XXIX: Technology and Devices
W. Andrew Clarkson; Ramesh K. Shori, Editor(s)

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