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The NASA Plankton, Aerosol, Cloud, ocean Ecosystem (PACE) mission: an emerging era of global, hyperspectral Earth system remote sensing
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Paper Abstract

The Plankton, Aerosol, Cloud, ocean Ecosystem (PACE) mission represents NASA’s next investment in satellite ocean color and the study of Earth’s ocean-atmosphere system, enabling new insights into oceanographic and atmospheric responses to Earth's changing climate. PACE objectives include extending systematic cloud, aerosol, ocean biological and biogeochemical data records, making essential ocean color measurements to further understand marine carbon cycles and ecosystem responses to a changing climate, as well as improving knowledge of how aerosols influence ocean ecosystems and, conversely, how ocean ecosystems and photochemical processes affect the atmosphere. PACE objectives also encompass management of fisheries, large freshwater bodies, and water quality and reducing uncertainties in climate and radiative forcing models of the Earth system. PACE observations will also provide information on radiative properties of land surfaces and characterization of the vegetation and soils that dominate their reflectance. The primary PACE instrument – the Ocean Color Instrument (OCI) – is a hyperspectral imaging radiometer that spans the ultraviolet to shortwave infrared, with a ground sample distance of 1-km at nadir. This includes continuous collection of spectra from 340 nm to 890 nm in 5 nm steps. The PACE payload is complemented by two multi-angle polarimeters with spectral ranges that span the visible to near-infrared region. Scheduled for launch in late 2022-to-early 2023, the PACE observatory will enable significant advances in the study of Earth’s biogeochemistry, carbon cycle, clouds, hydrosols, and aerosols in the ocean-atmosphere system. We present a brief overview of the PACE mission, followed by a discussion of the capabilities and design concept of OCI.

Paper Details

Date Published: 10 October 2019
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 11151, Sensors, Systems, and Next-Generation Satellites XXIII, 111510G (10 October 2019); doi: 10.1117/12.2537146
Show Author Affiliations
Eric T. Gorman, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
David A Kubalak, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Deepak Patel, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Andre' Dress, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
David B. Mott, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Gerhard Meister, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
P. Jeremy Werdell, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 11151:
Sensors, Systems, and Next-Generation Satellites XXIII
Steven P. Neeck; Philippe Martimort; Toshiyoshi Kimura, Editor(s)

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