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Proceedings Paper

TEMPO Green Paper: Chemistry, physics, and meteorology experiments with the Tropospheric Emissions: monitoring of pollution instrument
Author(s): K. Chance; X. Liu; C. Chan Miller; G. González Abad; G. Huang; C. Nowlan; A. Souri; R. Suleiman; K. Sun; H. Wang; L. Zhu; P. Zoogman; J. Al-Saadi; J. -C. Antuña-Marrero; J. Carr; R. Chatfield; M. Chin; R. Cohen; D. Edwards; J. Fishman; D. Flittner; J. Geddes; M. Grutter; J. R. Herman; D. J. Jacob; S. Janz; J. Joiner; J. Kim; N. A. Krotkov; B. Lefer; R. V. Martin; O. L. Mayol-Bracero; A. Naeger; M. Newchurch; G. G. Pfister; K. Pickering; R. B. Pierce; C. Rivera Cárdenas; A. Saiz-Lopez; W. Simpson; E. Spinei; R. J. D. Spurr; J. J. Szykman; O. Torres; J. Wang
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Paper Abstract

The NASA/Smithsonian Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO; tempo.si.edu) satellite instrument will measure atmospheric pollution and much more over Greater North America at high temporal resolution (hourly or better in daylight, with selected observations at 10 minute or better sampling) and high spatial resolution (10 km2 at the center of the field of regard). It will measure ozone (O3) profiles (including boundary layer O3), and columns of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), nitrous acid (HNO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), formaldehyde (H2CO), glyoxal (C2H2O2), water vapor (H2O), bromine oxide (BrO), iodine oxide (IO), chlorine dioxide (OClO), as well as clouds and aerosols, foliage properties, and ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation. The instrument has been delivered and is awaiting spacecraft integration and launch in 2022. This talk describes a selection of TEMPO applications based on the TEMPO Green Paper living document (http://tempo.si.edu/publications.html).

Applications to air quality and health will be summarized. Other applications presented include: biomass burning and O3 production; aerosol products including synergy with GOES infrared measurements; lightning NOx; soil NOx and fertilizer application; crop and forest damage from O3; chlorophyll and primary productivity; foliage studies; halogens in coastal and lake regions; ship tracks and drilling platform plumes; water vapor studies including atmospheric rivers, hurricanes, and corn sweat; volcanic emissions; air pollution and economic evolution; high-resolution pollution versus traffic patterns; tidal effects on estuarine circulation and outflow plumes; air quality response to power blackouts and other exceptional events.

Paper Details

Date Published: 10 October 2019
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 11151, Sensors, Systems, and Next-Generation Satellites XXIII, 111510B (10 October 2019); doi: 10.1117/12.2534883
Show Author Affiliations
K. Chance, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
X. Liu, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
C. Chan Miller, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
G. González Abad, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
G. Huang, Spelman College (United States)
C. Nowlan, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
A. Souri, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
R. Suleiman, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
K. Sun, Univ. at Buffalo (United States)
H. Wang, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
L. Zhu, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
P. Zoogman, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
J. Al-Saadi, NASA Langley Research Ctr. (United States)
J. -C. Antuña-Marrero, Univ. de Valladolid (Spain)
J. Carr, Carr Astronautics, Inc. (United States)
R. Chatfield, NASA Ames Research Ctr. (United States)
M. Chin, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
R. Cohen, Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)
D. Edwards, National Ctr. for Atmospheric Research (United States)
J. Fishman, St. Louis Univ. (United States)
D. Flittner, NASA Langley Research Ctr. (United States)
J. Geddes, Boston Univ. (United States)
M. Grutter, Univ. Nacional Autónoma de México (Mexico)
J. R. Herman, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
D. J. Jacob, Harvard Univ. (United States)
S. Janz, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
J. Joiner, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
J. Kim, Yonsei Univ. (Korea, Republic of)
N. A. Krotkov, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
B. Lefer, NASA Headquarters (United States)
R. V. Martin, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
Washington Univ. in St. Louis (United States)
Dalhousie Univ. (Canada)
O. L. Mayol-Bracero, Univ. of Puerto Rico (United States)
A. Naeger, Univ. of Alabama in Huntsville (United States)
M. Newchurch, The Univ. of Alabama in Huntsville (United States)
G. G. Pfister, National Ctr. for Atmospheric Research (United States)
K. Pickering, Univ. of Maryland (United States)
R. B. Pierce, Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison (United States)
C. Rivera Cárdenas, Univ. Nacional Autónoma de México (Mexico)
A. Saiz-Lopez, Institute of Physical Chemistry Rocasolano (Spain)
W. Simpson, Univ. of Alaska Fairbanks (United States)
E. Spinei, Viriginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ. (United States)
R. J. D. Spurr, RT Solutions, Inc. (United States)
J. J. Szykman, Environmental Protection Agency (United States)
O. Torres, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
J. Wang, The Univ. of Iowa (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 11151:
Sensors, Systems, and Next-Generation Satellites XXIII
Steven P. Neeck; Philippe Martimort; Toshiyoshi Kimura, Editor(s)

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