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The bidirectional reflectance of black silicon used in space and Earth remote sensing applications
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Paper Abstract

Space-based astrophysical and remote sensing observations often require the detection and measurement of light originating from distant and relatively faint objects. These observations are highly susceptible to scattered light which may introduce imaging artifacts, obscure object details, and increase measurement noise. This paper describes the initial work of characterizing representative black materials used in coronagraph instruments and other spaceborne instruments. Measurements of “blackness” and the achieved reflectance of black silicon are provided in the spectral range from 400nm to 2500nm using 8o directional hemispherical measurements. The bidirectional reflectance of black silicon was also measured at discrete wavelengths, 633nm, and 1064nm, using the optical scatterometer located at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center’s Diffuser Calibration Laboratory (DCL). A 100mm diameter black silicon sample was fabricated and optically characterized. The BRDF of other well-known black materials such as Z306 and Fractal Black are also presented and discussed.

Paper Details

Date Published: 10 October 2019
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 11151, Sensors, Systems, and Next-Generation Satellites XXIII, 111511E (10 October 2019); doi: 10.1117/12.2534799
Show Author Affiliations
Georgi T. Georgiev, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
James J. Butler, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Ron Shiri, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Christine A. Jhabvala, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Edward J. Wollack, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Elena M. Georgieva, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 11151:
Sensors, Systems, and Next-Generation Satellites XXIII
Steven P. Neeck; Philippe Martimort; Toshiyoshi Kimura, Editor(s)

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