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Proceedings Paper

The LUVOIR Extreme Coronagraph for Living Planetary Systems (ECLIPS) I: searching and characterizing exoplanetary gems
Author(s): L. Pueyo; C. Stark; R. Juanola-Parramon; N. Zimmerman; M. Bolcar; A. Roberge; G. Arney; G. Ruane; A. J. Riggs; R. Belikov; D. Sirbu; D. Redding; R. Soummer; I. Laginja; S. Will
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Paper Abstract

Detection and characterization of Earth-like planets around nearby stars using the direct imaging technique is a key scientific objective of future NASA astrophysics flagship missions. As a result, dedicated exoplanet instruments are being studied for the Large UV/Optical/Infrared Surveyor (LUVOIR) and the Habitable Exoplanet Imager (HabEx) mission concepts. In this paper we discuss the Extreme Coronagraph for Living Planetary Systems (ECLIPS) instrument of LUVOIR. ECLIPS will be capable of providing starlight suppression levels of ten orders of magnitude over a broad range of wavelengths in order to detect and characterize the light reflected from potentially Earth-like planets. It will also allow future astronomers to study in great detail the diversity of exoplanets. First, we review the main science drivers and emphasize those that are the most stressing on the instrument design. We then present the overall parameters of the instrument (general architecture and back-end camera). We delve into the details of the static coronagraph masks, which have a significant impact on the scientific productivity of the mission. We discuss the choices the LUVOIR team made in order to maximize the discovery yield of exoEarth candidates. We then present our work on the technological feasibility of such an instrument, focusing in particular on the image stability necessary to achieve ten orders of magnitude of starlight extinction over hours of exposure. We present our error budget and show that using a combination of instrument level (low and high order wavefront sensors) and observatory level telemetry can yield an overall architecture that meets these requirements. Finally, we discuss future technology development efforts that will mature these technologies.

Paper Details

Date Published: 9 September 2019
PDF: 29 pages
Proc. SPIE 11117, Techniques and Instrumentation for Detection of Exoplanets IX, 1111703 (9 September 2019);
Show Author Affiliations
L. Pueyo, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States)
C. Stark, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States)
R. Juanola-Parramon, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
N. Zimmerman, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
M. Bolcar, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
A. Roberge, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
G. Arney, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
G. Ruane, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
A. J. Riggs, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
R. Belikov, NASA Ames Research Ctr. (United States)
D. Sirbu, NASA Ames Research Ctr. (United States)
D. Redding, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
R. Soummer, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States)
I. Laginja, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States)
S. Will, The Institute of Optics, Univ. of Rochester (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 11117:
Techniques and Instrumentation for Detection of Exoplanets IX
Stuart B. Shaklan, Editor(s)

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