Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Accurate optical constants for liquids in the near-infrared:Improved methods for obtaining the n and k constants from 1 to 4 µm
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $17.00 $21.00

Paper Abstract

Other than open bodies of water, bulk liquids are rarely encountered in the environment. Rather, liquids are typically found as aerosols, liquid droplets, or liquid layers on sundry substrates: glass, concrete, metals, etc. The layers can be of varying thicknesses, from micron-level to millimeter thick deposits. The infrared (IR) reflectance spectra of such deposits vary greatly, approximating the bulk reflectance for thicker deposits and for thinner layers on reflective surfaces, producing “transflectance” spectra that more closely replicate simple transmission of the IR light twice traversing the absorptive medium. Rather than recording large numbers of such spectra to serve as endmembers of a spectral reflectance library, we have recognized that the spectra can be modeled so long as the complex optical constants n(ν) and k(ν) are known as a function of frequency, ν. Here n is the real (dispersion) part and k is the imaginary (absorption) component of the complex index of refraction. However, in many cases the bands in the longwave IR (7 to 13 μm) can become saturated, and better signal-to-noise and specificity can be realized at shorter wavelengths. In earlier studies, we obtained the n/k values from 1.28 to 25 μm for a series of liquids, but are now expanding those measurements to include additional liquid species and extending the spectral range to lower wavelengths. In this paper we describe the methodologies for compiling and fusing the two data sets collected to provide better and more complete spectral coverage from 1 to 25 μm (10,000 to 400 cm-1 ). The broad spectral range means that one needs to account for both strong and weak spectral features, all of which can be useful for detection, depending on the scenario. To account for the large dynamic range, both long and short path length transmission cells are required for accurate measurements.

Paper Details

Date Published: 17 May 2019
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 11010, Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosives (CBRNE) Sensing XX, 110100O (17 May 2019); doi: 10.1117/12.2519499
Show Author Affiliations
Tanya L. Myers, Pacific Northwest National Lab. (United States)
Russell G. Tonkyn, Pacific Northwest National Lab. (United States)
John S. Loring, Pacific Northwest National Lab. (United States)
Ashley M. Oeck, Pacific Northwest National Lab. (United States)
Catherine A. Banach, Pacific Northwest National Lab. (United States)
Ryan M. Francis, Pacific Northwest National Lab. (United States)
Yin-Fong Su, Pacific Northwest National Lab. (United States)
Timothy J. Johnson, Pacific Northwest National Lab. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 11010:
Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosives (CBRNE) Sensing XX
Jason A. Guicheteau; Chris R. Howle, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top
PREMIUM CONTENT
Sign in to read the full article
Create a free SPIE account to get access to
premium articles and original research
Forgot your username?
close_icon_gray