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Proceedings Paper

Selective spin-on deposition of polymers on heterogeneous surfaces
Author(s): Yuanyi Zhang; Colton D'Ambra; Reika Katsumata; Rachel A. Segalman; Craig J. Hawker; Christopher M. Bates
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Paper Abstract

Selective deposition holds promise to simplify next-generation device fabrication and bring down economic cost. In this work, selectively depositing polymers on metal/dielectric patterns was achieved by spin dewetting, a phenomenon that refers to the dewetting of polymers during spin coating. Our strategy utilizes self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) to induce dewetting of polymers over some areas. Line patterns of Cu/SiO2 were investigated. A hydrophobic SAM, octyltrichlorosilane (OTS, Cl3Si–C8H17), was selectively formed on SiO2 in the presence of Cu to render SiO2 non-wettable. During a subsequent spin coating step, polymers dewet from OTS-functionalized SiO2 and coat Cu exclusively. The spin dewetting process is strongly dictated by the spin coating kinetics. A systematic study of the processing conditions revealed strong dependence of polymer film coverage on spin speed, solution concentration, polymer molecular weight, casting solvent, and SAM hydrophobicity.

Paper Details

Date Published: 25 March 2019
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 10960, Advances in Patterning Materials and Processes XXXVI, 109600Q (25 March 2019); doi: 10.1117/12.2515666
Show Author Affiliations
Yuanyi Zhang, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara (United States)
Colton D'Ambra, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara (United States)
Reika Katsumata, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara (United States)
Rachel A. Segalman, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara (United States)
Craig J. Hawker, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara (United States)
Christopher M. Bates, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10960:
Advances in Patterning Materials and Processes XXXVI
Roel Gronheid; Daniel P. Sanders, Editor(s)

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