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Proceedings Paper

A spherical mirror-based illumination system for fluorescence excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging
Author(s): Samantha Gunn Mayes; Samuel A. Mayes; Craig Browning; Marina Parker; Thomas C. Rich; Silas J. Leavesley
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Paper Abstract

Many hardware approaches have been developed for implementing hyperspectral imaging on fluorescence microscope systems; each with tradeoffs in spectral sensitivity and spectral, spatial, and temporal sampling. For example, tunable filter-based systems typically have limited wavelength switching speeds and sensitivities that preclude high-speed spectral imaging. Here, we present a novel approach combining multiple illumination wavelengths using solid state LEDs in a 2-mirror configuration similar to a Cassegrain reflector assembly. This approach provides spectral discrimination by scanning a range of fluorescence excitation wavelengths, which we have previously shown can improve spectral image acquisition time compared to traditional fluorescence emission-scanning hyperspectral imaging. In this work, the geometry of the LED and other optical components was optimized. A model of the spectral illuminator was designed using TracePro ray tracing software (Lambda Research Corp.) that included an emitter, lens, Spherical mirror, flat mirror, and liquid light guide input. A parametric sensitivity study was performed to optimize the optical throughput varying the LED viewing angle, properties of the Spherical reflectors, the lens configuration, focal length, and position. The following factors significantly affected the optical throughput: LED viewing angle, lens position, and lens focal length. Several types of configurations were evaluated, and an optimized lens and LED position were determined. Initial optimization results indicate that a 10% optical transmission can be achieved for either a 16 or 32 wavelength system. Future work will include continuing to optimize the ray trace model, prototyping, and experimental testing of the optimized configuration.

Paper Details

Date Published: 4 March 2019
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 10881, Imaging, Manipulation, and Analysis of Biomolecules, Cells, and Tissues XVII, 108810N (4 March 2019); doi: 10.1117/12.2510553
Show Author Affiliations
Samantha Gunn Mayes, Univ. of South Alabama (United States)
Samuel A. Mayes, Univ. of South Alabama (United States)
Craig Browning, Univ. of South Alabama (United States)
Marina Parker, Univ. of South Alabama (United States)
Thomas C. Rich, Univ. of South Alabama (United States)
Silas J. Leavesley, Univ. of South Alabama (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10881:
Imaging, Manipulation, and Analysis of Biomolecules, Cells, and Tissues XVII
Daniel L. Farkas; Attila Tárnok; James F. Leary, Editor(s)

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