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Proceedings Paper

Configuration of readout electronics and data acquisition for the HiPERCAM instrument
Author(s): Naidu Bezawada; Xiaofeng Gao; David Henry; Martin Black; Chris Miller; David Lunney; Vik Dhillon; Stuart Littlefair; Paul Kerry; Trevor Gamble; Simon Dixon; Steven Parsons; Tom Marsh; Leander Mehrgan; Joerg Stegmeier; Derek Ives
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Paper Abstract

HiPERCAM is a five channel fast photometer to study high temporal variability of the universe, covering from 0.3 to 1.0 microns in five wavebands. HiPERCAM uses custom-made 2Kx1K split-frame transfer CCDs mounted in separate compact camera heads and cooled by thermoelectric coolers to 180K. The demands on the readout system are very unique to this instrument in that all five CCDs are operated in a pseudo drift window mode along with the normal windowing, binning and full-frame modes. The pseudo drift mode involves reading out small window regions from 2 quadrants of each CCD, with the possibility to exceed 1 kHz window rates per output channel. The CCDs are custom manufactured by Teledyne e2v to allow independent serial clock controls for each output. The devices are manufactured in standard and deep-depletion processes with appropriate anti-reflection coatings to achieve high quantum efficiencies in each of the five wavebands. An ESO NGC controller has been configured to control and readout all five CCDs. The data acquisition software has been modified to provide GPS timestamping of the data and access to the acquired data in real time for the data reduction software. The instrument has had its first light and first science observations on the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope, La Palma during a commissioning run in October 2017 and subsequently on the 10.4m Gran Telescopio Canarias in February 2018 and science observations in April 2018. This paper will present the details of the preamplifier electronics, configuration of the readout electronics and the data acquisition software to support the unique readout modes along with the overall performance of the instrument.

Paper Details

Date Published: 12 July 2018
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 10709, High Energy, Optical, and Infrared Detectors for Astronomy VIII, 1070924 (12 July 2018); doi: 10.1117/12.2313291
Show Author Affiliations
Naidu Bezawada, European Southern Observatory (United Kingdom)
Xiaofeng Gao, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr., Royal Observatory (United Kingdom)
David Henry, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr., Royal Observatory (United Kingdom)
Martin Black, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr., Royal Observatory (United Kingdom)
Chris Miller, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr., Royal Observatory (United Kingdom)
David Lunney, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr., Royal Observatory (United Kingdom)
Vik Dhillon, The Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom)
Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (Spain)
Stuart Littlefair, The Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom)
Paul Kerry, The Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom)
Trevor Gamble, The Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom)
Simon Dixon, The Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom)
Steven Parsons, The Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom)
Tom Marsh, The Univ. of Warwick (United Kingdom)
Leander Mehrgan, European Southern Observatory (Germany)
Joerg Stegmeier, European Southern Observatory (Germany)
Derek Ives, European Southern Observatory (Germany)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10709:
High Energy, Optical, and Infrared Detectors for Astronomy VIII
Andrew D. Holland; James Beletic, Editor(s)

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