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Proceedings Paper • Open Access

Athermal fiber laser for the SWARM absolute scalar magnetometer
Author(s): W. Fourcault; J.-M. Léger; V. Costes; I. Fratter; L. Mondin

Paper Abstract

The Absolute Scalar Magnetometer (ASM) developed by CEA-LETI/CNES is an optically pumped 4He magnetic field sensor based on the Zeeman effect and an electronic magnetic resonance whose effects are amplified by a laser pumping process [1-2]. Consequently, the role of the laser is to pump the 4He atoms at the D0 transition as well as to allow the magnetic resonance signal detection.

The ASM will be the scalar magnetic reference instrument of the three ESA Swarm satellites to be launched in 2012 in order to carry out the best ever survey of the Earth magnetic field and its temporal evolution. The sensitivity and accuracy of this magnetometer based on 4He optical pumping depend directly on the characteristics of its light source, which is the key sub-system of the sensor.

We describe in this paper the selected fiber laser architecture and its wavelength stabilization scheme. Its main performance in terms of spectral emission, optical power at 1083 nm and intensity noise characteristics in the frequency bands used for the operation of the magnetometer, are then presented. Environmental testing results (thermal vacuum cycling, vibrations, shocks and ageing) are also reported at the end of this paper.

Paper Details

Date Published: 20 November 2017
PDF: 5 pages
Proc. SPIE 10565, International Conference on Space Optics — ICSO 2010, 105650P (20 November 2017); doi: 10.1117/12.2309215
Show Author Affiliations
W. Fourcault, CEA-LETI, MINATEC (France)
J.-M. Léger, CEA-LETI, MINATEC (France)
V. Costes, Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales (France)
I. Fratter, Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales (France)
L. Mondin, Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales (France)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10565:
International Conference on Space Optics — ICSO 2010
Errico Armandillo; Bruno Cugny; Nikos Karafolas, Editor(s)

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