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Proceedings Paper

Use of material decomposition in the context of neurovascular intervention using standard flat panel and a high-resolution CMOS detector
Author(s): A. R. Podgorsak; A. C. Venkataraman; S. V. Setlur Nagesh; D. R. Bednarek; S. Rudin; A. Siddiqui; C. N. Ionita
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Paper Abstract

The imaging of endovascular devices during neurovascular procedures such as the coiling of aneurysms guided with CBCT imaging may be challenging due to the presence of highly attenuating materials such as platinum in the coil and stent marker, nickel-titanium in the stent, iodine in the contrast agent, and tantalum in the embolization agent. The use of dual-energy imaging followed by a basis material decomposition image processing-scheme may improve the feature separation and recognition. Two sets of testing were performed to validate this concept. The first trial was the acquisition of dual-energy micro-CBCT data of a 3D-printed simple aneurysm model using a 49.5 μm pixel size CMOS detector (Teledyne DALSA, Waterloo, ON.). Two sets of projection data were acquired using beam energies of 35 kVp and 70 kVp. Axial slices were reconstructed and used to carry out the material decomposition processing. The second trial was the acquisition of dual-energy CBCT images of a RS-240T angiographic head phantom (Radiology Support Devices Inc., CA.) with an iodine vascular insert using a Toshiba Infinix BiPlane C-arm system coupled to a flat panel detector. Two sets of image data were acquired using beam energies of 80 kVp and 120 kVp. Following image reconstruction, slices of the phantom were decomposed using the same processing as previously. The resulting image data over both trials indicate that the decomposition process was successful in separating the kinds of materials commonly used during a neurovascular intervention, such as platinum, cobalt-chromium, and iodine. The normalized root mean square error metric was used to quantitatively assess this. This indicates a basis for future more clinically relevant testing of our methods.

Paper Details

Date Published: 12 March 2018
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 10578, Medical Imaging 2018: Biomedical Applications in Molecular, Structural, and Functional Imaging, 105780L (12 March 2018); doi: 10.1117/12.2292564
Show Author Affiliations
A. R. Podgorsak, Univ. at Buffalo (United States)
Toshiba Stroke and Vascular Research Ctr. (United States)
A. C. Venkataraman, Toshiba Stroke and Vascular Research Ctr. (United States)
S. V. Setlur Nagesh, Toshiba Stroke and Vascular Research Ctr. (United States)
D. R. Bednarek, Toshiba Stroke and Vascular Research Ctr. (United States)
Univ. at Buffalo (United States)
S. Rudin, Univ. at Buffalo (United States)
Toshiba Stroke and Vascular Research Ctr. (United States)
A. Siddiqui, Toshiba Stroke and Vascular Research Ctr. (United States)
Univ. at Buffalo (United States)
C. N. Ionita, Univ. at Buffalo (United States)
Toshiba Stroke and Vascular Research Ctr. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10578:
Medical Imaging 2018: Biomedical Applications in Molecular, Structural, and Functional Imaging
Barjor Gimi; Andrzej Krol, Editor(s)

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