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Proceedings Paper

100J-level nanosecond pulsed Yb:YAG cryo-cooled DPSSL amplifier
Author(s): J. M. Smith; T. J. Butcher; P. D. Mason; K. Ertel; P. J. Phillips; S. Banerjee; M. De Vido; O. Chekhlov; M. Divoky; J. Pilar; W. Shaikh; C. Hooker; A. Lucianetti; C. Hernandez Gomez; T. Mocek; C. Edwards; J. L. Collier
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Paper Abstract

We report on the successful demonstration of the world’s first kW average power, 100 Joule-class, high-energy, nanosecond pulsed diode-pumped solid-state laser (DPSSL), DiPOLE100. Results from the first long-term test for amplification will be presented; the system was operated for 1 hour with 10 ns duration pulses at 10 Hz pulse repetition rate and an average output energy of 105 J and RMS energy stability of approximately 1%. The laser system is based on scalable cryogenic gas-cooled multi-slab ceramic Yb:YAG amplifier technology. The DiPOLE100 system comprises three major sub-systems, a spatially and temporally shaped front end, a 10 J cryo-amplifier and a 100 J cryo-amplifier. The 10 J cryo-amplifier contain four Yb:YAG ceramic gain media slabs, which are diode pumped from both sides, while a multi-pass architecture configured for seven passes enables 10 J of energy to be extracted at 10 Hz. This seeds the 100 J cryo-amplifier, which contains six Yb:YAG ceramic gain media slabs with the multi-pass configured for four passes. Our future development plans for this architecture will be introduced including closed-loop pulse shaping, increased energy, higher repetition rates and picosecond operation. This laser architecture unlocks the potential for practical applications including new sources for industrial materials processing and high intensity laser matter studies as envisioned for ELI [1], HiLASE [2], and the European XFEL [3]. Alternatively, it can be used as a pump source for higher repetition rate PW-class amplifiers, which can themselves generate high-brightness secondary radiation and ion sources leading to new remote imaging and medical applications.

Paper Details

Date Published: 15 February 2018
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 10511, Solid State Lasers XXVII: Technology and Devices, 105110T (15 February 2018); doi: 10.1117/12.2289579
Show Author Affiliations
J. M. Smith, STFC Rutherford Appleton Lab. (United Kingdom)
T. J. Butcher, STFC Rutherford Appleton Lab. (United Kingdom)
P. D. Mason, STFC Rutherford Appleton Lab. (United Kingdom)
K. Ertel, STFC Rutherford Appleton Lab. (United Kingdom)
P. J. Phillips, STFC Rutherford Appleton Lab. (United Kingdom)
S. Banerjee, STFC Rutherford Appleton Lab. (United Kingdom)
M. De Vido, STFC Rutherford Appleton Lab. (United Kingdom)
O. Chekhlov, STFC Rutherford Appleton Lab. (United Kingdom)
M. Divoky, Institute of Physics of the ASCR v.v.i. (Czech Republic)
J. Pilar, Institute of Physics of the ASCR v.v.i. (Czech Republic)
W. Shaikh, STFC Rutherford Appleton Lab. (United Kingdom)
C. Hooker, STFC Rutherford Appleton Lab. (United Kingdom)
A. Lucianetti, Institute of Physics of the ASCR v.v.i. (Czech Republic)
C. Hernandez Gomez, STFC Rutherford Appleton Lab. (United Kingdom)
T. Mocek, Institute of Physics of the ASCR v.v.i. (Czech Republic)
C. Edwards, STFC Rutherford Appleton Lab. (United Kingdom)
J. L. Collier, STFC Rutherford Appleton Lab. (United Kingdom)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10511:
Solid State Lasers XXVII: Technology and Devices
W. Andrew Clarkson; Ramesh K. Shori, Editor(s)

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