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Proceedings Paper

Lens-free microscopy of cerebrospinal fluid for the laboratory diagnosis of meningitis
Author(s): Robin Delacroix; Sophie Nhu An Morel; Lionel Hervé; Thomas Bordy; Pierre Blandin; Jean-Marc Dinten; Michel Drancourt; Cédric Allier
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Paper Abstract

The cytology of the cerebrospinal fluid is traditionally performed by an operator (physician, biologist) by means of a conventional light microscope. The operator visually counts the leukocytes (white blood cells) present in a sample of cerebrospinal fluid (10 μl). It is a tedious job and the result is operator-dependent. Here in order to circumvent the limitations of manual counting, we approach the question of numeration of erythrocytes and leukocytes for the cytological diagnosis of meningitis by means of lens-free microscopy. In a first step, a prospective counts of leukocytes was performed by five different operators using conventional optical microscopy. The visual counting yielded an overall 16.7% misclassification of 72 cerebrospinal fluid specimens in meningitis/non-meningitis categories using a 10 leukocyte/μL cut-off. In a second step, the lens-free microscopy algorithm was adapted step-by-step for counting cerebrospinal fluid cells and discriminating leukocytes from erythrocytes. The optimization of the automatic lens-free counting was based on the prospective analysis of 215 cerebrospinal fluid specimens. The optimized algorithm yielded a 100% sensitivity and a 86% specificity compared to confirmed diagnostics. In a third step, a blind lens-free microscopic analysis of 116 cerebrospinal fluid specimens, including six cases of microbiology confirmed infectious meningitis, yielded a 100% sensitivity and a 79% specificity. Adapted lens-free microscopy is thus emerging as an operator-independent technique for the rapid numeration of leukocytes and erythrocytes in cerebrospinal fluid. In particular, this technique is well suited to the rapid diagnosis of meningitis at point-of-care laboratories.

Paper Details

Date Published: 20 February 2018
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 10510, Frontiers in Biological Detection: From Nanosensors to Systems X, 105100K (20 February 2018); doi: 10.1117/12.2289539
Show Author Affiliations
Robin Delacroix, Aix-Marseille Univ., INSERM, CNRS, IRD, URMITE (France)
Sophie Nhu An Morel, Univ. de Grenoble Alpes, CEA-LETI (France)
Lionel Hervé, Univ. de Grenoble Alpes, CEA-LETI (France)
Thomas Bordy, Univ. de Grenoble Alpes, CEA-LETI (France)
Pierre Blandin, Univ. de Grenoble Alpes, CEA-LETI (France)
Jean-Marc Dinten, Univ. de Grenoble Alpes, CEA-LETI (France)
Michel Drancourt, Aix-Marseille Univ., INSERM, CNRS, IRD, URMITE (France)
Cédric Allier, Univ. de Grenoble Alpes, CEA-LETI (France)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10510:
Frontiers in Biological Detection: From Nanosensors to Systems X
Amos Danielli; Benjamin L. Miller; Sharon M. Weiss, Editor(s)

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