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Proceedings Paper

Optical frequency conversion at the nanoscale: metallic, dielectric, and semiconductor nanostructures (Conference Presentation)

Paper Abstract

Here we review our journey from metallic nanostructures to dielectric and semiconductor metasurfaces. We show how to employ metal non-linearity to stimulate a strongly anisotropic nonlinear response by symmetry breaking, despite their high Ohmic losses. Furthermore, we show how an ultra-thin surface of subwavelength dielectric nanostructures, e.g. silicon with negligible losses and multipolar characteristics, can enable enhanced light matter interaction for efficient third harmonic generation and ultra-fast light modulation. However, the centrosymmetric structure of silicon and the lack of quadratic nonlinearity, guided us towards exploiting semiconductor nanostructures, particularly III-V semiconductors. Subsequently, we demonstrate dielectric realization of AlGaAs nanoantennas for an efficient second harmonic generation, allowing the control of both directionality and polarization of nonlinear emission. This is enabled through the fabricated high-quality AlGaAs nanostructures embedded in an optically transparent low-index material. Our results open novel applications in ultra-thin light sources, light switches and modulators, ultra-fast displays, night-vision and other nonlinear optical metadevices based on resonant nanoparticles.

Paper Details

Date Published: 14 March 2018
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Proc. SPIE 10540, Quantum Sensing and Nano Electronics and Photonics XV, 1054018 (14 March 2018); doi: 10.1117/12.2281498
Show Author Affiliations
Lei Xu, The Australian National Univ. (Australia)
Mohsen Rahmani, The Australian National Univ. (Australia)
Dragomir N. Neshev, The Australian National Univ. (Australia)
Yuri S. Kivshar, The Australian National Univ. (Australia)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10540:
Quantum Sensing and Nano Electronics and Photonics XV
Manijeh Razeghi; Gail J. Brown; Jay S. Lewis; Giuseppe Leo, Editor(s)

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