Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Non-invasive neural stimulation
Author(s): William J. Tyler; Joseph L. Sanguinetti; Maria Fini; Nicholas Hool
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $17.00 $21.00

Paper Abstract

Neurotechnologies for non-invasively interfacing with neural circuits have been evolving from those capable of sensing neural activity to those capable of restoring and enhancing human brain function. Generally referred to as non-invasive neural stimulation (NINS) methods, these neuromodulation approaches rely on electrical, magnetic, photonic, and acoustic or ultrasonic energy to influence nervous system activity, brain function, and behavior. Evidence that has been surmounting for decades shows that advanced neural engineering of NINS technologies will indeed transform the way humans treat diseases, interact with information, communicate, and learn. The physics underlying the ability of various NINS methods to modulate nervous system activity can be quite different from one another depending on the energy modality used as we briefly discuss. For members of commercial and defense industry sectors that have not traditionally engaged in neuroscience research and development, the science, engineering and technology required to advance NINS methods beyond the state-of-the-art presents tremendous opportunities. Within the past few years alone there have been large increases in global investments made by federal agencies, foundations, private investors and multinational corporations to develop advanced applications of NINS technologies. Driven by these efforts NINS methods and devices have recently been introduced to mass markets via the consumer electronics industry. Further, NINS continues to be explored in a growing number of defense applications focused on enhancing human dimensions. The present paper provides a brief introduction to the field of non-invasive neural stimulation by highlighting some of the more common methods in use or under current development today.

Paper Details

Date Published: 18 May 2017
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 10194, Micro- and Nanotechnology Sensors, Systems, and Applications IX, 101941L (18 May 2017); doi: 10.1117/12.2263175
Show Author Affiliations
William J. Tyler, Arizona State Univ. (United States)
Joseph L. Sanguinetti, Univ. of New Mexico (United States)
U.S. Army Research Lab. (United States)
Maria Fini, Arizona State Univ. (United States)
Nicholas Hool, Arizona State Univ. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10194:
Micro- and Nanotechnology Sensors, Systems, and Applications IX
Thomas George; Achyut K. Dutta; M. Saif Islam, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top
PREMIUM CONTENT
Sign in to read the full article
Create a free SPIE account to get access to
premium articles and original research
Forgot your username?
close_icon_gray