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Proceedings Paper

Fully automatic color print inspection by digital image processing systems
Author(s): Bryan Hayes
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Paper Abstract

This paper discusses print inspection systems based on digital image processing technology. The basic print inspection task is comparing a reference image to a current image. Upon this technology a number of different applications are based: Print quality check, print process control, order mix-up detection/prevention and (label-based) sorting. The main process parameters are position/orientation of the print, the number of colors printed, the complexity of the print and the set-up of the print inspection system (inline/inline with process control/offline). Important reasons for using print inspection system are: 100% quality control, operator-independent quality standard, yield increase, reduced need for manpower. Print inspection systems consist of a sensor unit containing the illumination and camera and the control computer system equipped with the image processing computer (a frame grabber with dedicated image processing hardware and optionally a CPU), the process computer (controlling the complete system and the I/O) and various I/O facilities (screen, keyboard, operator interface, digital I/O). Three examples of advanced print inspection systems are presented (all of which have been developed, implemented and installed by Basler GmbH): CD label inspection featuring a 3-chip color camera, CD paperwork inspection for detecting order mix-ups, and a mileage indicator inspection system with a line scan camera based sensor unit.

Paper Details

Date Published: 9 November 1994
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 2247, Sensors and Control for Automation, (9 November 1994); doi: 10.1117/12.193931
Show Author Affiliations
Bryan Hayes, Basler Image Processing GmbH (Germany)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2247:
Sensors and Control for Automation
Markus Becker; R. W. Daniel; Otmar Loffeld, Editor(s)

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