Share Email Print

Spie Press Book

Field Guide to Optical Biosensing
Format Member Price Non-Member Price

Book Description

This Field Guide provides a concise, self-contained, and rigorous overview of the different processes, techniques, and configurations used to develop optical biosensors. Several representative applications in many different fields are provided. Other practical aspects, such as commonly used biorecognition elements and common methods of bioreceptor immobilization, are also presented.

Book Details

Date Published: 21 January 2021
Pages: 122
ISBN: 9781510638594
Volume: FG48

Table of Contents
SHOW Table of Contents | HIDE Table of Contents

Glossary

Introduction and Definitions
Motivation
What Is a Biosensor?
Elements of a Biosensor
Example: Immunochromatographic Assays

Types of Biosensors
Non-optical Biosensors
Optical Biosensors

Background
History of Biosensors
Early Milestones in the Development of Biosensors
Later Milestones in the Development of Biosensors

Surface Functionalization and Immobilization of Bioreceptors
Immobilization of Bioreceptors
From Surface Functionalization to Analyte Capture
Common Bioreceptors
More Bioreceptors
Usual Methods of Immobilization

Performance Parameters
Precision and Accuracy
Repeatability, Reproducibility, and Selectivity
Sensitivity
Measurand, Full-Scale, and Dynamic Ranges
Signal-to-Noise Ratio
Minimum Detectable Signal and Saturation
Time Factors and Stability

Practical Aspects
Resolution, Threshold, Calibration, and Hysteresis
Linearity, Offset, and Overload
Deviations from Ideality (Errors)
The Ideal Biosensor

Fundamental Optical Sensing Mechanisms
Fundamental Optical Processes
Transmission, Absorption, and Scattering
Optical Phase Difference and Optical Path Difference
Polarization
Surface Plasmon Resonance
Luminescence
Photoluminescence
Fluorescence
Phosphorescence
Fluorescence Polarization

Detection Methods, Techniques, and Configurations
Absorbance Biosensors
Infrared Spectroscopy
Infrared Vibrational Modes
Scattering Detection
Resonance Rayleigh Scattering
Transduction Based on Reflectance and Transmittance
Interferometric Biosensors
Colorimetric Bioassays
Biosensing Using Ellipsometry
Photonic Crystals
Fluorescence-Based Biosensing
Fluorescence Polarization Detection
Phosphorescence-Based Biosensing
Chemiluminescence
Bioluminescence
Time-Resolved Fluorescence
Evanescent Wave Biosensing
Attenuated Total Reflection Spectroscopy
Fiber-Optic Biosensors
Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy
Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensors
Real-Time SPR Sensing
Phase-Sensitive Biosensing
Optical Heterodyne Detection
Polarimetry
Photoacoustic Spectroscopy
Raman Spectroscopy
Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Detection
Planar Optical Waveguides and Integrated Optical Sensors
Waveguide Interferometer Architectures
Mach-Zehnder Interferometer
Young Interferometer
Hartmann Interferometer
Dual Polarization Interferometry
Bimodal Waveguide Interferometers
Resonant Waveguide Grating
Antiresonant Reflecting Optical Waveguides
Hollow Waveguides
Photonic Crystal Cavity Biosensors
Resonant Optical Microcavities
Beyond the Visible and Infrared Ranges
Integrated Microfluidic Biosensors
Lab-on-a-Chip Devices
Bioimaging

Applications
Medicine
Infections Caused by Pathogens
Airborne Diseases
Point-of-Care Testing Techniques
Home Monitoring
Optical Biosensors for Therapeutic Drug Monitoring
Food Safety
Common Foodborne Pathogens
Food Industry
Biosensors for the Detection of Foodborne Pathogens
Defense
Important Biological Warfare Agents
Some Optical Biosensors for Biological Warfare Agents
Homeland Security
Environmental Applications
Wearable and Implantable Biosensors
Challenges in Biosensor Commercialization

Equation Summary

References

Index


The main aim of this Field Guide is to provide a concise, self-contained, but rigorous overview of the different processes, techniques, and configurations used to develop optical biosensors. Several representative applications in many different fields are provided. Other practical aspects, such as commonly used biorecognition elements and common methods of bioreceptor immobilization, are also presented.

In spite of the strong interdisciplinary character intrinsic to the field of optical biosensing, the book is written to be accessible to scientists and engineers with very diverse backgrounds. But this Field Guide is also intended to interest undergraduate and doctoral students seeking a broad overview of this complex field in a short amount of time.

In order to accomplish these objectives, an extensive collection of figures and tables is included. Also, given its introductory nature, a large number of references to authoritative reviews are provided for readers who want to deepen their understanding of specific topics.

Raul Martin-Palma
October 2020


© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top
PREMIUM CONTENT
Sign in to read the full article
Create a free SPIE account to get access to
premium articles and original research
Forgot your username?
close_icon_gray