The advancements in biophotonics and imaging have led to many of the step change discoveries in medicine and biosciences. Innovations in instrumentation, methodologies and analytical methods drive the evolution of this discipline enabling deeper insights into life sciences. Topical challenges in imaging include improving resolution, speed, information, throughput and depth which are required to improve fundamental biological understanding, diagnostic accuracy, early detection and prognostic capability for timely interventions and improving health and well-being. New imaging modalities, advances in optical hardware, the ongoing evolution of improvements in algorithms and the introduction of AI/ML in data collection and analysis all combine to provide exciting new capabilities to overcome the above challenges and to provide solutions in biomedicine and health. This conference provides a forum for the international research community in academic, industry and government labs to disseminate and discuss the latest findings on research frontiers and emerging biophotonics technologies. Authors are encouraged to submit original papers related to all aspects of biophotonics and imaging with the following topics being of particular interest for inclusion in this conference:

The conference will be comprised of sessions consisting of contributed talks, invited presentations and a poster session to encourage networking, discussion and sharing of information. Two poster awards, one voted on by the conference program chairs and committee members and another voted on by conference delegates, will be given to student authors at the conclusion of the conference.;
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Conference 11879

Frontiers in Biophotonics and Imaging

In person: 29 - 30 September 2021 | Alsh 2
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  • Wednesday Plenary Session
  • 1: Label-free Microscopy
  • 2: Deep Tissue, Non-linear, and Volumetric Imaging
  • 3: Optical Manipulation and Computation
  • Thursday Plenary Session
Wednesday Plenary Session
In person: 29 September 2021 • 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM BST | Lomond Auditorium
09:00: Welcome, Introduction, and Special Announcement
David Andrews, SPIE President, Univ. of East Anglia (United Kingdom)

09:20: Understanding the Role of Photonics in a Changing World

Carol Monaghan, Member of the Science and Technology Select Committee, Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology (board member), Industry and Parliament Trust (board member), Chair of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Photonics and Quantum, Vice Chair All Party Parliamentary Group on Space (United Kingdom)

For decades, the photonics industry has been at the forefront of global innovation and research. Developments such as advanced LIDAR systems for autonomous vehicles, secure quantum computers and 5G communications, ensure that this sector remains as relevant as ever with the potential for major growth across multiple technologies. However increased threats to national security mean that the importance of this industry goes beyond basic economics. Set against a backdrop of a challenging funding landscape, can governments really afford not to invest in photonics and quantum?

Carol Monaghan graduated from the University of Strathclyde in 1993 with a BSc (Hons) in Laser Physics and Optoelectronics before training as a physics teacher. Her 20-year teaching career included 14 years as Head of Physics and Science at Hyndland Secondary. Carol was first elected as the MP for Glasgow North West in 2015 and re-elected in 2017 and 2019. She is the SNP’s Westminster Spokesperson for Education, Armed Forces and Veterans.

09:45: Question & Answer with Carol Monaghan

09:55: Welcome by Lord Provost of the City of Glasgow

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Author(s): Carol Monaghan, UK Parliament (United Kingdom)
In person: 29 September 2021 • 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM BST | Lomond Auditorium
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For decades, the photonics industry has been at the forefront of global innovation and research. Developments such as advanced LIDAR systems for autonomous vehicles, secure quantum computers and 5G communications, ensure that this sector remains as relevant as ever with the potential for major growth across multiple technologies. However increased threats to national security mean that the importance of this industry goes beyond basic economics. Set against a backdrop of a challenging funding landscape, can governments really afford not to invest in photonics and quantum?
Break
Coffee Break 10:00 AM - 10:30 AM
Session 1: Label-free Microscopy
In person: 29 September 2021 • 10:30 AM - 12:15 PM BST | Alsh 2
Session Chairs: Sumeet Mahajan, Univ. of Southampton (United Kingdom), Francesca Palombo, Univ. of Exeter (United Kingdom)
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Author(s): Christopher Bendkowski, University College London (United Kingdom); Bin Fu, University College London (United Kingdom), University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Petru Manescu, University College London (United Kingdom); Remy Claveau, University of Strasbourg (France); Delmiro Fernandez-Reyes, University College London (United Kingdom); Michael J. Shaw, National Physical Lab (United Kingdom), University College London (United Kingdom)
On demand | Presented Live 29 September 2021
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In this talk we present a simple, low-cost Fourier ptychographic microscope system developed for histological and cytological imaging. We explore the influence of the hardware configuration and sample properties on image quality and imaging throughput and describe image reconstruction strategies to minimise image artefacts. By evaluating imaging performance using a range of biomedical samples, including peripheral blood films and tissue sections, we find that FPM increases the information capture capacity of the optical microscope several fold, allowing improved label-free examination and quantification of features such as tissue and cell morphology and the detection of parasites.
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Author(s): Konstantinos N. Bourdakos, Duanyang Xu, Peter B. Johnson, Anna Crisford, Lin Xu, Sijing Liang, Jonathan H. V. Price, David J. Richardson, Sumeet Mahajan, Univ. of Southampton (United Kingdom)
On demand | Presented Live 29 September 2021
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A novel, low cost, synchronisation free Optical Parametric Amplifier (OPA) as a light source for multimodal Coherent Raman Scattering (CRS) microscopy is presented. The OPA uses a continuous wave (CW) laser as a seed removing the need for synchronisation while it is pumped by a picosecond laser at 1031 nm. We show that the OPA can be seeded by a variety of CW laser sources of different cost and tunability and that it can also be used in association with an Optical Parametric Oscillator or as a completely autonomous light source for multimodal CRS microscopy.
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Author(s): John J. Tomes, Simon Astley, Line Macaire, Aberystwyth Univ. (United Kingdom); Claire Reigate, Techion Ltd. (United Kingdom); Rachel Cross, Aberystwyth Univ. (United Kingdom)
On demand | Presented Live 29 September 2021
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Here we describe the evaluation and subsequent re-design of an optical, point of care parasite infection diagnostic instrument. The original optical system was resolution limited by the focusing objective which had an f5.6 optical aperture with an effective 3Mega pixel performance giving a minimum resolution of 3.73μm. Changing the objective to an f2.4 lens and employing 12Mega pixel sensor, combined with illumination modelling and re-design improved resolution to 1.46μm with a 3mm field of view. This presents a simple case for change which lead to benefits in both instrument sensitivity and improved parasite identification and speciation
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Author(s): Victor J. Ochoa-Gutierrez, Mauro Pazmino Betancourth, Julien Reboud, Andrew R. Harvey, Jonathan M. Cooper, Univ. of Glasgow (United Kingdom)
On demand | Presented Live 29 September 2021
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We are exploring different optical windows in the mid infrared that can be used to develop future point-in care tools and methodologies. We performed preliminary analysis on defibrinated horse blood, spectra regions 3000-3600, 2000-2100 and 1300 cm-1. Aimed for a better understanding of metha-haemoglobin poisoning presence.
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Author(s): Francesca Palombo, Univ of Exeter (United Kingdom)
On demand | Presented Live 29 September 2021
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A recent effort in advancing a well established technique in material science - Brillouin spectroscopy - is making it amenable to applications in biomedical science, e.g. to live cells and tissues. Brillouin scattering is the inelastic scattering of light from longitudinal acoustic phonons that propagate across matter, sensing its viscoelastic properties. As the technique is performed in the GHz range (and on a micro-scale), much attention has been focused on the biological relevance of elasticity and viscosity probed in this spatio-temporal regime. In this talk, I review the most recent advances in this emerging biophotonic technique and its potential in biomechanics and mechanobiology.
Break
Lunch Break/Exhibition 12:15 PM - 1:45 PM
Session 2: Deep Tissue, Non-linear, and Volumetric Imaging
In person: 29 September 2021 • 1:45 PM - 3:15 PM BST | Alsh 2
Session Chair: Ilias Tachtsidis, Univ. College London (United Kingdom)
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Author(s): Frédéric Lange, Univ College London (United Kingdom)
On demand | Presented Live 29 September 2021
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Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is an optical technique that can measure brain tissue oxygenation and haemodynamics in real time and at the patient bedside allowing medical doctors to access important physiological information. In particular, time-domain NIRS (or TD-NIRS) is the most advanced NIRS technique, collecting the biggest amount of information, increasing the accuracy of the measurements and enabling to extract detailed information of the absolute optical properties of the tissues. All these optical information allows to extract detailed physiological information about the brain, and also get some insights into to the tissue’s anatomy. In this talk, I will first present the basics of TD-NIRS and review the strengths and weaknesses of the technique in a clinical context. I will then review a few clinical applications that have benefited from the use of TD-NIRS, with a special focus on the use of TD-NIRS on people with multiple sclerosis.
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Author(s): Richard J. Colchester, Univ. College London (United Kingdom); John T. Moore, Terry M. Peters, Western Univ. (Canada); Malcolm C. Finlay, Adrien E. Desjardins, Univ. College London (United Kingdom)
On demand | Presented Live 29 September 2021
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All-optical ultrasound imaging is well-suited to minimally invasive surgical procedures. We present a device that can provide real-time M-mode ultrasound images, and demonstrate its use imaging a dynamic heart valve phantom. This device, comprising two optical fibres, one with a graphene-polydimethylsiloxane composite coating for ultrasound generation, and a second with a concave Fabry-Pérot cavity for ultrasound reception, was used to image mitral valve movements. Real-time M-mode imaging was possible at depths > 2 cm from the probe, with axial resolutions < 50 µm. This work demonstrates the potential for all-optical ultrasound imaging to be used for guidance of intracardiac interventions.
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Author(s): James Read, Konstantinos N. Bourdakos, Sumeet Mahajan, Univ. of Southampton (United Kingdom)
In person: 29 September 2021 • 2:30 PM - 2:45 PM BST | Alsh 2
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A novel coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) methodology was developed that uses electronic resonance enhancement. Pre-resonance detuning was chosen because it enhances the signal without massively increasing the noise. This methodology was shown for Rhodamine 800 (Rh800) to have a limit of detection of low mircomolar concentration (µM) which is a couple orders of magnitude than non-enhanced CARS. The characteristics of the technique such as photobleaching and concentration dependence were analysed. The resonance CARS methodology also allowed cellular detection of Rh800 specific to mitochondria and determine the distribution of free and bound water within cells.
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Author(s): Andrew R. Harvey, Jonathan Taylor, Yongzhuang Zhou, Vytatus Zickus, Paul Zammit, Univ of Glasgow (United Kingdom)
In person: 29 September 2021 • 2:45 PM - 3:15 PM BST | Alsh 2
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The localization of point sources in optical microscopy enables nm-precision imaging of single molecules and biological dynamics. We report new methods of localization microscopy using Airy beams that yield precise 3D localization with the key advantages of extended depth range, higher optical throughput, and potential for imaging higher emitter densities than are possible using other techniques. The presentation will describe illustrative applications to extended-depth-range imaging of blood-flow imaging in a live zebrafish and for traction-force microscopy.
Break
Coffee Break/Poster Session 3:15 PM - 4:00 PM
Session 3: Optical Manipulation and Computation
In person: 29 September 2021 • 4:00 PM - 6:25 PM BST | Alsh 2
Session Chairs: Michael J. Shaw, National Physical Lab. (United Kingdom), Lynn Paterson, Heriot-Watt Univ. (United Kingdom), Stefanie Reichelt, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (United Kingdom)
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Author(s): Shuailong Zhang, Beijing Institute of Technology (China); Aaron Wheeler, Univ of Toronto (Canada)
In person: 29 September 2021 • 4:00 PM - 4:30 PM BST | Alsh 2
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In this work, we introduce a microrobotic system that can be driven by light. Using optoelectronic tweezers, gear-shaped microrobots can be programmed and controlled by light patterns to carry out sophisticated, multi-axis operations. One particularly useful program is a serial combination of “load,” “transport,” and “deliver,” which can be applied to manipulate cells for applications in the life sciences and beyond.
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Author(s): Lynn Paterson, Heriot-Watt Univ. (United Kingdom); Tania Mendonca, University of Nottingham (United Kingdom); Manlio Tassieri, University of Glasgow (United Kingdom); Amanda J. Wright, University of Nottingham (United Kingdom); Paul A. Dalgarno, Heriot Watt University (United Kingdom)
In person: 29 September 2021 • 4:30 PM - 5:00 PM BST | Alsh 2
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I will discuss a 3D microrheology system that combines Optical Tweezers with Integrated Multiplane Microscopy. 3D tracking of an optically trapped bead, is achieved with ~ 20 nm accuracy along the optical axis. We have developed a straightforward image sharpness spatial calibration method using images of a trapped particle that have been captured simultaneously from multiple planes. The viscosity of water has been measured simultaneously in three dimensions, showing the effectiveness of the technique. I will also discuss some future prospects for the system to measure the mechanical properties of biological material.
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Author(s): Robert Archibald, Graham M. Gibson, Univ. of Glasgow (United Kingdom); Samuel T. Westlake, Cranfield Univ. (United Kingdom); Akhil Kallepalli, Univ. of Glasgow (United Kingdom)
On demand | Presented Live 29 September 2021
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Open source and open access technologies and solutions have paved the way for making science accessible the world over. We adopt the 3D printed OpenFlexure Delta Stage microscope to image biological samples and classify them using machine learning algorithms. The contributions include a complete workflow for microscopic imaging and the OPEN-BIOset dataset for future research within and beyond the machine learning community. We achieved a categorical accuracy of 99.9% and 99.59% for the training and the testing sets. Our research shows evidence of the efficacy of open source tools and other possible modalities of microscopy with the OpenFlexure microscope.
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Author(s): Ysanne Pritchard, Aikta Sharma, Claire Clarkin, Helen Ogden, Sumeet Mahajan, Ruben J. Sanchez-Garcia, Univ. of Southampton (United Kingdom)
In person: 29 September 2021 • 5:15 PM - 5:30 PM BST | Alsh 2
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We present an automated topological method to analyse the porosity of cortical bone, including number, size, distribution, and crowding within and across samples. Our method uses persistent homology with a signed Euclidean distance transform filtration, summarised with persistence statistics. This provides structural analysis on second harmonic generation and two photon excitation fluorescence images, which capture the collagen and autofluorescence of cells in the bone tissue. Despite the small sample size, we show classification of transgenic mice bone tissue of males (females) into genetically modified and control categories. Our results highlight the potential of topological methods in biological research.
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Author(s): Dmitrii A. Poletaev, Bogdan V. Sokolenko, V.I. Vernadsky Crimean Federal Univ. (Russian Federation)
On demand | Presented Live 29 September 2021
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Nanoantennas are nanostructures that are widely used for receiving and transmitting electromagnetic waves. The aim of the work is a theoretical calculation of the proposed nanostructure for DNA detection. The proposed DNA detector consists of a monopole nanoantenna; primer - a short fragment of a nucleotide sequence complementary to the detected DNA region, which binds to the detected DNA sequence, conventionally indicated in the figure by a cylinder with height d. The DNA detector works as follows. Geometrical dimensions, type of material, dielectric elements surrounding a monopole nanoantenna affect its resonance frequency - the frequency of absorption of an incident electromagnetic wave. In the initial state, the primer is not connected to the DNA strand, while a small primer with the corresponding value of the relative permittivity insignificantly changes the resonance frequency of the monopole nanoantenna.
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Author(s): Martin J. Booth, Univ of Oxford (United Kingdom)
In person: 29 September 2021 • 5:45 PM - 6:25 PM BST | Alsh 2
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Adaptive optics (AO) have been widely used for the measurement and correction of aberrations in microscopes, particularly to overcome the problems caused when focussing deep into specimens. Over the past couple of decades, a range of AO methods have been developed for many different microscopes and applications, spanning from large volume imaging for neuroscience to super-resolution microscopy for cell biology. We review the history of these developments and assess the current status of the field. The future challenges in transforming AO microscopy into a widely used technology will also be discussed
Thursday Plenary Session
In person: 30 September 2021 • 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM BST | Lomond Auditorium
09:00: Welcome and Introduction
David Andrews, SPIE President, Univ. of East Anglia (United Kingdom)

09:20: Strengthening Our Superpowers: Technology, Missions, and the UK Innovation Strategy


Simone Boekelaar, Innovate UK (United Kingdom)

What does HMG’s new Innovation Strategy tell us about how this government will intervene to promote emerging tech, and what it wants to achieve by doing so? What might this look like from the photonics’ sector’s perspective? A chance to hear about the evolution and objectives of the governments’ new innovation strategy, along with potential plans for implementation and industry engagement.

Simone Boekelaar is the Head of Horizon Scanning at Innovate UK, the UK government’s innovation agency. With a background in economics and engineering, Simone leads a team that scans for the emerging technologies and trends that will be most impactful on UK industry in 2030 and beyond. From health diagnostics to entertainment, from space travel to manufacturing glass bottles, Simone and her team scour the academic and industrial worlds to seek out the under-supported and overlooked technologies and trends likely to be critical to all our futures.

09:45: Question & Answer with Simone Boekelaar
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Author(s): Simone Boekelaar, Innovate UK (United Kingdom)
In person: 30 September 2021 • 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM BST | Lomond Auditorium
Show Abstract + Hide Abstract
What does HMG’s new Innovation Strategy tell us about how this government will intervene to promote emerging tech, and what it wants to achieve by doing so? What might this look like from the photonics’ sector’s perspective? A chance to hear about the evolution and objectives of the governments’ new innovation strategy, along with potential plans for implementation and industry engagement.
Conference Chair
Sumeet Mahajan
Univ. of Southampton (United Kingdom)
Conference Chair
Stefanie Reichelt
Human Cell Atlas, Wellcome Sanger Institute (United Kingdom)
Program Committee
UiT The Arctic Univ. of Norway (Norway)
Program Committee
King's College London (United Kingdom)
Program Committee
Univ. of Exeter (United Kingdom)
Program Committee
Heriot-Watt Univ. (United Kingdom)
Program Committee
National Physical Lab. (United Kingdom)
Program Committee
Ilias Tachtsidis
Univ. College London (United Kingdom)