Make your plans to attend
Vaccination required
>
This conference aims to provide a forum for discussion of fundamentals, methods, and techniques in laser materials processing and their relation to the applications and manufacturing of micro- and nanoscale electronic, photonic, optical, mechanical, fluidic, energy, and hybrid devices. Topics cover process development and applications in technology and for photonics, consumer electronics and medical devices.

Papers are solicited on, but not limited to, the following topics within the broad area of microelectronics, photonic devices, and optoelectronics manufacturing. Papers will be solicited on the utility of lasers enabled advanced manufacturing.

DYNAMICS OF LASER-MATTER INTERACTION
LASER PROCESSES IN MANUFACTURING
PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES
JOINT SESSIONS are planned with:
BEST STUDENT PRESENTATION AWARD
Supported by the conference cosponsors, we will offer awards for the best oral and poster presentations given by students (honored with a cash prize of $500 for each). Student contributions will be judged based on scientific content and quality of presentation. To be eligible for the awards, you must:
  • be a graduate or undergraduate full-time student;
  • have conducted the majority of the work to be presented;
  • submit your abstract online by the deadline;
  • be the primary author;
  • select “Yes” when asked if you are a full-time student;
  • select yourself as the speaker;
  • under TOPIC selection, choose “Consider for Best Student Paper Award”;
  • be accepted to present at conference LA301;
  • submit your manuscript online by the deadline;
  • make the oral/poster presentation.
Note that prior prize holders will not be eligible.
;
In progress – view active session
Conference 11988

Laser Applications in Microelectronic and Optoelectronic Manufacturing (LAMOM) XXVII

25 - 26 January 2022 | Room 205 (Level 2 South)
All sponsors
Show conference sponsors + Hide conference sponsors
View Session ∨
  • LASE Plenary and Hot Topics
  • 1: Ultrafast Laser-based Fabrication of Glass
  • 2: GHz Laser Material Processing and Diagnostics
  • 3: Laser Processing of Semiconductor Materials
  • 4: Excimer and CO2 Laser-based Material Processing and Laser-induced Forward Transfer
  • Posters-Tuesday
  • 5: Ultrafast Laser-enabled Photonics, Sources, and Integration
  • 6: Laser Beam Shaping, Control, and Parallel Processing
  • 7: Additive and Nanoscale Material Processing
  • LAMOM Best Student Paper Award
Information

Check the conference schedule frequently for updates | Presentation times are subject to change

  • Presenters: Please inform SPIE of any changes by 7 January
  • Presentation times will be finalized on 19 January
LASE Plenary and Hot Topics
24 January 2022 • 3:30 PM - 6:00 PM PST | Room 207/215 (Level 2 South)
3:30 PM - 3:35 PM: Welcome and Opening Remarks
Craig B. Arnold, Princeton Univ. (United States)

3:35 PM - 3:40 PM: Special Announcement from SPIE
11994-501
Author(s): Tammy Ma, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
24 January 2022 • 3:45 PM - 4:25 PM PST | Room 207/215 (Level 2 South)
Show Abstract + Hide Abstract
This past August, a record-breaking shot with 1.3 megajoules of fusion yield was achieved on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This experimental result, decades in the making, is a significant breakthrough for laser-driven inertial fusion. This talk will review the experimental results, the photonics advancements and many more technologies that made this breakthrough possible, and the implications for future research. Furthermore, these recent game-changing results on the NIF now lay the groundwork to explore laser inertial fusion as a path for clean energy and energy security.
11985-601
Author(s): Clara J. Saraceno, Ruhr-Univ. Bochum (Germany)
24 January 2022 • 4:20 PM - 4:40 PM PST | Room 207/215 (Level 2 South)
Show Abstract + Hide Abstract
High-power ultrafast laser technology has seen extremely fast-paced progress in the last decades, giving momentum to many fields. Nowadays, laser systems delivering hundreds of watts to kilowatts of average power with pulse energies ranging from microjoules to hundreds of millijoules become increasingly available, based on fiber, slabs and disk laser geometries. In this talk, we will discuss a recent hot topic enabled by progress in high-power ultrafast laser sources, that is the demonstration of table-top sources of few-cycle THz radiation with extremely high average power – reaching a performance level which was so far restricted to accelerator facilities. We will discuss new possibilities opened by these unique sources both in research and applied fields.
11990-502
Author(s): Michael Kues, Leibniz Univ. Hannover (Germany)
24 January 2022 • 4:40 PM - 5:20 PM PST | Room 207/215 (Level 2 South)
Show Abstract + Hide Abstract
Today’s quantum technology relies on the realization of large-scale non-classical systems in practical formats to enable quantum-accelerated computing, secure communications and enhanced sensing. Optical on-chip quantum frequency combs, characterized by many equidistantly spaced frequency modes, allow the storage of large amounts of quantum information. The combination with control techniques, using accessible state-of-the-art telecommunications infrastructure, can constitute a powerful frequency-domain quantum circuit with new functionalities and represents an approach towards realizing practical large-scale controllable quantum systems. In this presentation, we will review approaches for the efficient realization of quantum frequency combs in on-chip waveguide structures and micro-resonators. We will show their applicability for the realization of quantum systems with considerably enhanced complexity, particularly generating and manipulating on-chip multi-photon and high-dimensional quantum states as well as discrete high-dimensional cluster states, laying at the basis of measurement based-quantum computing. Building on this, the realization of frequency-domain Hong-Ou-Mandel interference of independent photons, fundamental to quantum information processing, as well as an outlook on frequency-domain circuits will be discussed.
11991-602
Author(s): Jennifer A. Dionne, Stanford Univ. (United States)
24 January 2022 • 5:20 PM - 5:40 PM PST | Room 207/215 (Level 2 South)
Show Abstract + Hide Abstract
We present a new platform for sensitive molecular detection and control spanning 1) multiplexed genetic and proteomic screening, 2) single-cellular bacterial identification and drug susceptibility testing, and 3) chiral molecular synthesis and separation, based on high-quality-factor phase gradient metasurfaces. The high-quality factor of our metasurfaces produces a large amplification of the electromagnetic field, increasing the response to targeted binding of biomarkers. Simultaneously, the optical signal is beam-steered for multiplexed detection. We develop these metasurfaces for a new respiratory panel of SARS-CoV-2, RSV, and influenza; Raman-based identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing of pathogens; and sensitive identification and purification of chiral molecules including amino acids and small-molecule pharmaceuticals and agrochemicals.
11988-603
Author(s): Andrés Fabián Lasagni, TU Dresden (Germany), Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoff- und Strahltechnik IWS (Germany)
24 January 2022 • 5:40 PM - 6:00 PM PST | Room 207/215 (Level 2 South)
Show Abstract + Hide Abstract
Laser-microtextured surfaces have gained an increasing interest due to their enormous spectrum of applications and industrial scalability. In this frame, several research studies have demonstrated how laser-based fabrication methods can be used to produce functional surfaces. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated is many cases, that the combination of structures with feature sizes in different ranges (e.g., microelements decorated with nanostructures) can not only further enhanced specific functions but also to provide surfaces with several functionalities. In this context, this talk shows how Direct Laser Interference Patterning (DLIP), Direct Laser Writing (DLW) and Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS) can be combined, reaching advanced functionalities on technological relevant materials.
Break
Coffee Break 7:30 AM - 9:30 AM
Session 1: Ultrafast Laser-based Fabrication of Glass
25 January 2022 • 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM PST | Room 205 (Level 2 South)
Session Chair: Laura Gemini, ALPhANOV (France)
11988-1
Author(s): Martynas Beresna, Qi Sun, Przemyslaw Falak, Univ. of Southampton (United Kingdom); David Phillips, Univ. of Exeter (United Kingdom); Tom Vettenburg, Univ. of Dundee (United Kingdom); Ali Masoudi, Gilberto Brambilla, Univ. of Southampton (United Kingdom)
25 January 2022 • 10:00 AM - 10:30 AM PST | Room 205 (Level 2 South)
Show Abstract + Hide Abstract
Scattering often results in unwanted losses and noise in any optical system, becoming a key limiting factor. Therefore, considerable attention is paid to minimise scattering in many manufacturing processes and laser writing is no exception. However, in certain situations, optical scattering can become the basis for the operation of an optical system. This paper will discuss two applications of optical scattering: spectrometry and reflectometry. In both cases, optical scattering is introduced into the system by means of a femtosecond laser, which allows precise control and positioning of the scattering centers, and ensures long-term stability of the treated material.
11988-3
Author(s): Jan Vanda, Institute of Physics of the CAS (Czech Republic); Mihai-George Muresan, Pavel Cech, Martin Mydlar, Katerina Pilna, Institute of Physics of the CAS, v.v.i. (Czech Republic); Martin Smrz, Michal Chyla, Jiri Muzik, Denisa Stepankova, Institute of Physics of the CAS (Czech Republic); Jan Brajer, Tomas Mocek, HiLASE Ctr. (Czech Republic); Bohumil Stoklasa, Stepan Venos, Jiri Kucharik, Meopta - optika, s.r.o. (Czech Republic)
25 January 2022 • 10:30 AM - 10:50 AM PST | Room 205 (Level 2 South)
Show Abstract + Hide Abstract
Glass sheets with ~ 0.1 mm thickness are a promising material from which interposers for high density chip packaging can be produced due to its electrical and mechanical properties. For successful application in microelectronics, it is necessary to develop a way of efficient, high-speed production of interconnecting holes through such glass substrate, so-called through glass vias (TGVs). One of the most promising technique is Laser-Induced Deep Etching (LIDE), where picosecond laser is used to modified particular areas on the glass substrate. Then, using wet etching process, the area exposed to the laser will be etched more quickly than unexposed area. However, effective and large-scale glass modification often requires use of high-energy pulsed UV laser source, which unnecessary complicates the whole application. Here we present effective preparation of treated glass substrate using Yb:YAG laser at its fundamental wavelength 1030 nm, which is capable to overcome such disadvantage. We induced 5-15 m diameter regular affected areas on ~100 m substrate at various pitch, enabling scaled-up production of precise TGVs.
11988-43
Author(s): Maximilian Brosda, Phong Nguyen, Alexander Olowinsky, Arnold Gillner, Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik (Germany)
25 January 2022 • 10:50 AM - 11:10 AM PST | Room 205 (Level 2 South)
Show Abstract + Hide Abstract
Organic photovoltaic (OPV) modules can be manufactured using photonic laser based processes (drying, scribing, edge deletion) in a roll to roll process. The fabricated flexible OPV modules must be encapsulated on all sides with multilayer thermoplastic ultra high barrier films to protect them from the environment. With an adapted laser wavelength and suitable beam shaping, the intrinsic absorption bands of the individual layers can be addressed, locally melted and thus welded. For efficient roll-to-roll production, suitable irradiation strategies and clamping technology are required. These are determined, compared and classified on the basis of weld quality investigations and discussed comprehensively.
11988-5
Author(s): Rene Liebers, Christopher Mauer, 3D-Micromac AG (Germany); Matthias Jotz, SCHOTT AG (Germany), SCHOTT AG (Germany); Jana Nissel, 3D-Micromac AG (Germany); Fabian Wagner, SCHOTT AG (Germany)
25 January 2022 • 11:10 AM - 11:30 AM PST | Room 205 (Level 2 South)
Show Abstract + Hide Abstract
The fast growing market for consumer-devices based on Augmented Reality (AR) technology requires optical waveguides. These components used for image projection are made of high index glass or other transparent materials. Cutting eyeglasses out of the bare, or preprocessed material has complex requirements to available processes. For some years now, laser cutting processes of transparent materials with ultrashort pulse (USP) lasers have been increasingly adopted in those industrial applications. The ability of a fully automated process flow is of critical importance especially for AR products, that target the mass production market. Laser cutting tools combine the good edge quality with fully automated process flows and free-form capability. This presentation covers the advantages of laser technology based on application examples for AR-waveguides.
Session 2: GHz Laser Material Processing and Diagnostics
25 January 2022 • 11:30 AM - 11:50 AM PST | Room 205 (Level 2 South)
Session Chair: Laura Gemini, ALPhANOV (France)
11988-9
Author(s): Tobias Steege, Adrian Belkin, Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoff- und Strahltechnik IWS (Germany); Andrés F. Lasagni, TU Dresden (Germany)
25 January 2022 • 11:30 AM - 11:50 AM PST | Room 205 (Level 2 South)
Show Abstract + Hide Abstract
Direct laser interference patterning (DLIP) has emerged as a versatile tool for producing well-defined microstructures that mimic natural surfaces with the aim of obtaining functionalized surfaces on relevant technological materials. On the other hand, the fabrication of surface patterns with micro- and submicron resolution features necessitates of advanced monitoring and setup strategies in order to ensure repeatability as well as quality control. In addition, the monitoring systems also allow inline capabilities to enable a closed-loop control approach. A possible strategy, that has been already applied to different laser processes, is the utilization of the sound pressure generated by the laser beam hitting the surface and producing ablation that can be detected and analyzed using commercially available microphones. In this frame, this work focuses on the analysis of the acoustic information extracted from the audio signal for determining process-inherent characteristics in DLIP, allowing the calculation of interference volume using stainless steel and titanium as reference materials. The results show that the acoustic emission measured at the ablation spot can be correlated to the interference volume shape and thus allowing to approximate the size of the interference spot. The possible utilization of this approach as an auto-focus and auto-setup method during DLIP is discussed.
Break
Lunch/Exhibition Break 11:50 AM - 2:00 PM
Session 3: Laser Processing of Semiconductor Materials
25 January 2022 • 2:00 PM - 3:10 PM PST | Room 205 (Level 2 South)
Session Chair: Laura Gemini, ALPhANOV (France)
11988-11
Author(s): Onur Tokel, Bilkent Univ. (Turkey)
25 January 2022 • 2:00 PM - 2:30 PM PST | Room 205 (Level 2 South)
Show Abstract + Hide Abstract
Here, we demonstrate the first controlled nano-fabrication capability deep inside silicon wafers. We exploit a spatially-structured laser beam and novel fabrication approaches, in order to achieve multi-dimensional nano-confinement inside the bulk. We demonstrate the formation of 100-nm-sized buried structures. We further showcase this new capability with the first fully buried nano-photonic element inside silicon, a Bragg grating. To the best of our knowledge this constitutes the first controlled nano-fabrication capability, as well as the first functional nano-photonic device, created deep inside silicon without any surface alteration.
11988-12
Author(s): Ruobing Song, Jayoung Park, Nikita Lisenko, Bonan Shen, Alexander Killips, Adithya P. Nair, Columbia Univ. (United States); Joshua E. Schoenly, Manuel Leonardo, IPG Photonics Corp. (United States); Roger Dowd, IPG Medical Corp. (United States); James S. Im, Columbia Univ. (United States)
25 January 2022 • 2:30 PM - 2:50 PM PST | Room 205 (Level 2 South)
Show Abstract + Hide Abstract
In this paper, we report on the findings that pertain to evaluating the immediate viability of an UV-fiber-laser- based Si crystallization method referred to as spot-beam annealing (SBA). The SBA method leverages ultra-high frequency/low-energy pulses in order to flexibly create optimal conditions for executing various crystallization and annealing techniques for display and semiconductor applications. Specifically, we present recent experimental results that were obtained using a newly constructed SBA system that definitively show that SBA is capable of providing a highly ordered polycrystalline material, which is equivalent to the material generated using state-of-the-art ELA manufacturing systems. We discuss the implication of the results on the effectiveness of the polygon-scanner-based beam delivery schemes, and additional future variations and applications of the SBA method.
11988-13
Author(s): Ruobing Song, Bonan Shen, Nikita Lisenko, Jayoung Park, Wenkai Pan, Columbia Univ. (United States); Joshua E. Schoenly, Manuel Leonardo, Roger Dowd, IPG Photonics Corp. (United States); James S. Im, Columbia Univ. (United States)
25 January 2022 • 2:50 PM - 3:10 PM PST | Room 205 (Level 2 South)
Show Abstract + Hide Abstract
In this paper, we show via transient thermal analysis that the use of ultra-high-frequency high-power fiber lasers as implemented in the spot-beam annealing method makes it possible to (1) flexibly induce and mimic the overall annealing conditions that were accomplished previously using various other types of lasers, and (2) engineer and leverage the periodic and highly transient thermal spikes that arise due to the individual laser pulses. We point out and discuss how such annealing characteristics may be well-suited for optimally inducing structural/topological relaxation, and compositional short-range ordering of amorphous thin films, as for instance are presumably involved in annealing of amorphous IGZO films on high-temperature-processing- intolerant glass/plastic substrates for fabricating stable oxide TFTs for AMOLED displays.
Break
Coffee Break 3:10 PM - 3:40 PM
Session 4: Excimer and CO2 Laser-based Material Processing and Laser-induced Forward Transfer
25 January 2022 • 3:40 PM - 4:20 PM PST | Room 205 (Level 2 South)
Session Chair: Laura Gemini, ALPhANOV (France)
11988-17
Author(s): Xinghua Li, Corning Incorporated (United States)
25 January 2022 • 3:40 PM - 4:00 PM PST | Room 205 (Level 2 South)
Show Abstract + Hide Abstract
We present controlled fracture propagation technique for cutting of ultrathin glass. The fracture is generated by tensile stress generated by a CO2 or a CO laser heating process. The technique enables free-shape cutting of ultrathin glass with small local radius of curvature.
11988-20
Author(s): Axel Fehrenbacher, Marc Sailer, Benjamin Fuehra, Stephan Haefner, Dirk H. Sutter, TRUMPF Laser GmbH (Germany); Kian Janami, TRUMPF Laser- und Systemtechnik GmbH (Germany); Steffen Ruebling, TRUMPF Laser GmbH (Germany); Ulf Quentin, Daniel Flamm, TRUMPF Laser- und Systemtechnik GmbH (Germany)
25 January 2022 • 4:00 PM - 4:20 PM PST | Room 205 (Level 2 South)
Show Abstract + Hide Abstract
Ultrafast deep UV (DUV) at 257.5 nm through fourth harmonic generation of established industrial lasers has shown to be beneficial for cutting thin multi-layer polymers as well as µLED debonding from sapphire wafers for next generation displays. The primary goal of utilizing DUV vs. longer wavelengths is achieving superior quality by minimizing the heat affected zone (HAZ) through better absorption, shorter penetration depths and tighter focusing with small spot sizes < 15 µm. In this work we demonstrate cutting of thin polymer foils using UV and DUV for which the energy efficiency, cutting edge quality and productivity is analyzed.
Posters-Tuesday
25 January 2022 • 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM PST | Moscone West, Lobby (Level 3)
Conference attendees are invited to attend the LASE poster session on Tuesday evening. Come view the posters, enjoy light refreshments, ask questions, and network with colleagues in your field.

Poster Setup: Tuesday 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
View poster presentation guidelines and set-up instructions at
https://spie.org/PW/Poster-Guidelines
11988-39
Author(s): Daeyeon Kim, Yonsei Univ. (Korea, Republic of); Chang-Hyun Park, Univ. de Bordeaux (France); Sang-Min Lee, Yonsei Univ. (Korea, Republic of); Yannick Petit, Lionel Canioni, Univ. de Bordeaux (France); Seung-Han Park, Yonsei Univ. (Korea, Republic of)
25 January 2022 • 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM PST | Moscone West, Lobby (Level 3)
Show Abstract + Hide Abstract
Type Argentum Direct Laser Writing (Type A DLW) is a type of direct laser writing in silver containing zinc phosphate glasses by using femtosecond(fs) pulse laser. When glasses is irradiated with fs laser pulses, ring-shaped silver cluster is formed because of nonlinear absorption. And the refractive index changes. We fabricate Y-shaped junctions, which is general 2D structure waveguide. A symmetric and asymmetric Y-junctions gives various splitting ratio between two branches. Consequently, Type A DLW in silver containing glasses can be employed the useful way of making an optical device.
Session 5: Ultrafast Laser-enabled Photonics, Sources, and Integration
26 January 2022 • 9:10 AM - 10:00 AM PST | Room 205 (Level 2 South)
Session Chair: Laura Gemini, ALPhANOV (France)
11988-23
Author(s): Jerome Lapointe, Albert Dupont, Samuel Pouliot, Théo Guérineau, Jonathan Lafreniere-Greig, Younes Messaddeq, Réal Vallée, Ctr. d'optique, photonique et laser (Canada)
26 January 2022 • 9:10 AM - 9:40 AM PST | Room 205 (Level 2 South)
Show Abstract + Hide Abstract
Multiphoton absorption via ultrafast laser focusing is the only technology that allows a three-dimensional structural modification of transparent materials. This ultra-simple single-step fabrication tool allows the fast prototyping of photonics circuits in virtually any transparent material. In this communication, we present our recent progress on two topics of interest: the challenge of increasing smooth type I laser-induced refractive index change and the photoinscription of waveguides and sensors in mid- and long-wave infrared materials. We particularly demonstrate waveguide bend radii down to <400 µm and depress-cladding waveguide with single-mode operation at 10.6 µm with propagation loss of <0.63 dB/cm.
11988-42
Author(s): Elias H. Penilla, Javier E. Garay, Univ. of California, San Diego (United States)
26 January 2022 • 9:40 AM - 10:00 AM PST | Room 205 (Level 2 South)
Show Abstract + Hide Abstract
Laser welding can make ceramics integral components in devices for harsh environments as well as in optoelectronic and/or electronic packages needing visible-radio frequency transparency. We will discuss an ultrafast pulsed laser welding approach that relies on focusing light on interfaces to ensure an optical interaction volume in ceramics to stimulate nonlinear absorption processes, causing localized melting rather than ablation. We will begin by comparing laser joining of glasses and ceramics. We will then introduce various methods for controlling the absorption and scattering properties for ceramics because the key to the technique is the interplay between linear and nonlinear optical properties and laser energy–material coupling. Finally, we will discuss results of laser material interaction on various oxide ceramics.
Break
Coffee Break 10:00 AM - 10:30 AM
Session 6: Laser Beam Shaping, Control, and Parallel Processing
26 January 2022 • 10:30 AM - 12:10 PM PST | Room 205 (Level 2 South)
Session Chair: Laura Gemini, ALPhANOV (France)
11988-25
Author(s): Beat Neuenschwander, Michalina W. Chaja, Berner Fachhochschule Technik und Informatik (Switzerland); Andreas Oehler, Lumentum (Switzerland); Markus Gafner, Berner Fachhochschule Technik und Informatik (Switzerland)
26 January 2022 • 10:30 AM - 10:50 AM PST | Room 205 (Level 2 South)
Show Abstract + Hide Abstract
Machining of stainless steel with ultrashort laser pulses is often a challenging task due to heat accumulation problems leading to bumpy surfaces or due to the formation of cavities or cone-like protrusions (CLP) at high pulse energies. With a specific diffractive optical element (DOE) leading to a special beam shape and synchronized scanning a removal rate of 16 mm3/min was achieved on steel AISI 304 with an average power of 180 W and a repetition rate of 1 MHz. Flat and shiny surfaces without CLP's and bumps having a surface roughness of sa < 500 nm were achieved. In case of copper the maximum removal rate amounted 17 mm3/min with a surface roughness of sa < 400 nm at a repetition rate of 400 kHz and an average power of about 150 W. The experiments clearly show, that with beam forming high average powers can be used for high quality laser micromachining with ultrashort laser pulses and single beams at average powers exceeding 100 W.
11988-26
Author(s): Emmanuel Stratakis, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (Greece)
26 January 2022 • 10:50 AM - 11:10 AM PST | Room 205 (Level 2 South)
Show Abstract + Hide Abstract
Nature has provided a plethora of functional surfaces exhibiting unique, complex hierarchical morphologies with dimensions of features ranging from the macroscale to the nanoscale. Such morphologies are behind the superior properties exhibited by the natural surfaces, including extreme wetting, antireflection, floatation, adhesion, friction and mechanical strength [Mat. Sci Eng. R, Reports, 141, 100562, (2020)]. Femtosecond (fs) laser surface structuring has been employed to produce numerous biomimetic structures for a range of applications, including microfluidics, tribology, tissue engineering and advanced optics. In this paper, we provide an overview of our recent research activities towards fs laser fabrication of biomimetic self-organised surface structures of variable shape and periodicity on different types of materials, including metals, semiconductors and dielectrics. Such structures were produced upon line and large area processing with multiple femtosecond laser beams of tailored shape and polarization. The primary research objective is to perform a systematic investigation of the laser conditions that lead to structures with specific application-based properties such as, drag reduction, omnidirectional diffraction and anti-reflection. The capability of fabrication of a plethora of complex structures, realised upon variation of the laser beam polarization, brings about a new concept in biomimetic structuring and it can be considered as an emerging laser based fabrication approach. The structure formation mechanism is explained through a detailed investigation of the fundamental processes that characterize laser-matter interaction.
11988-27
Author(s): Anthony Nakhoul, Lab. Hubert Curien (France); Claire Maurice, École des Mines de Saint-Étienne (France); Stéphanie Reynaud, Florence Garrelie, Florent Pigeon, Jean-Philippe Colombier, Lab. Hubert Curien (France)
26 January 2022 • 11:10 AM - 11:30 AM PST | Room 205 (Level 2 South)
Show Abstract + Hide Abstract
Ultrafast-laser irradiated surface is a typical paragon of a self-organizing system, which emerge and organize complex micropatterns and even nanopatterns. An astounding exhibition of dissipative structures consists of various types of randomly and periodically generated nanostructures that originate from a homogeneous metal surface. The formation of nanopeaks, nanobumps, nanohumps and nanocavities patterns with 20–80 nm transverse size unit and up to 100 nm height are reported under femtosecond laser irradiation with a regulated energy dose. We shed the light on the originality of the nanopeaks, having an exceptional aspect ratio on the nanoscale. They are primarily generated on the crests grown between the convective cells formed on the very first pulses. The production of these distinct nanostructures can enable unique surface functionalizations toward the control of mechanical, biomedical, optical, or chemical surface properties on a nanometric scale.
11988-28
Author(s): Gwenn Pallier, CAILabs (France); Mathieu Dijoux, Lasea France (France); Ivan Gusachenko, CAILabs (France); Sebastien Estival, Paul Etienne Martin, Lasea France (France); Pu Jian, Guillaume Labroille, CAILabs (France)
26 January 2022 • 11:30 AM - 11:50 AM PST | Room 205 (Level 2 South)
Show Abstract + Hide Abstract
Laser microprocessing using Ultra-Short Pulse lasers has developed thanks to the achieved process quality. The main challenge of those processes is the yield improvement. This study will focus on yield improvement of applications such as such as probe card manufacturing for electronic applications with a green USP laser using beam splitting. We present here a fully reflective beam splitter compatible with 500fs green lasers. The compatibility with an industrial machine is demonstrated through a F-theta lens, as well as through a precession head. We show here the process results including the repeatability of the pattern, and the achievable ablation rate.
11988-29
Author(s): Xiaohan Du, Camilo Florian, Craig B. Arnold, Princeton Univ. (United States)
26 January 2022 • 11:50 AM - 12:10 PM PST | Room 205 (Level 2 South)
Show Abstract + Hide Abstract
Multi-focal beam shaping can enhance laser processing throughput by increasing the number of processing sites and lowering processing time. This paper implements multi-focal beam shaping by adopting a tunable acoustic gradient of index (TAG) lens, which scans the focal position in the axial direction at 140 kHz. When the laser is synced with the corresponding phases of the TAG lens, multiple focal spots can be selected, allowing for ultrafast and flexible multi-focal modulation without physically moving any optics. We further characterize the tuning parameters of the TAG lens, such as its frequency, amplitude, and phase, and demonstrate the dual-focal marking on both sides of a glass slide in a single lateral scan.
Break
Lunch/Exhibition Break 12:10 PM - 1:40 PM
Session 7: Additive and Nanoscale Material Processing
26 January 2022 • 1:40 PM - 2:50 PM PST | Room 205 (Level 2 South)
Session Chair: Laura Gemini, ALPhANOV (France)
11988-30
Author(s): Nicholas E. Cappe, Univ. of Notre Dame (United States); Jonathon T. Goldstein, Air Force Research Lab. (United States); Edward C. Kinzel, Univ. of Notre Dame (United States)
26 January 2022 • 1:40 PM - 2:10 PM PST | Room 205 (Level 2 South)
Show Abstract + Hide Abstract
This presentation describes printing optical fiber using the digital glass forming (DGF). In this process, a CO2 laser locally heats single-mode fiber as it is continuously fed onto a moving substrate. The laser heating precisely controls the temperature and viscosity of the glass. The substrate is positioned by four-axis computer controlled stages which allows deposition of complex patterns including drawing free-standing structures, as well as isolated beads on a substrate and arbitrary forms The process parameters also affect coupling to/from cladding modes in the fiber. This facilitates coupling between adjacent fibers and the fabrication of different integrated devices.
11988-31
Author(s): Erik Waller, Fraunhofer-Institut für Techno- und Wirtschaftsmathematik ITWM (Germany); Georg von Freymann, Fraunhofer-Institut für Techno- und Wirtschaftsmathematik ITWM (Germany), Technische Univ. Kaiserslautern (Germany)
26 January 2022 • 2:10 PM - 2:30 PM PST | Room 205 (Level 2 South)
Show Abstract + Hide Abstract
A method to directly fabricate silver topographies with high fabrication throughput on arbitrary substrates is presented. The method is based on a laser induced photoreduction of a silver precursor and assisted by nucleation seeds, substrate functionalization and a multi-exposure fabrication scheme. In total, the novel photo-sensitive material and the novel fabrication scheme enable effective fabrication speeds of up to a centimeter per second. With this fabrication speed, the fabrication of silver topographies extending over several millimeters – e.g., components working in the THz frequency range - is now feasible and sample applications presented.
11988-32
Author(s): Ming-Tsang Lee, National Tsing Hua Univ. (Taiwan)
26 January 2022 • 2:30 PM - 2:50 PM PST | Room 205 (Level 2 South)
Show Abstract + Hide Abstract
Liquid precursor-based laser-induced reductive patterning techniques enable fast and economical fabrication of flexible electronics. An eco-friendly and particle-free copper ionic solutions for laser-induced reductive patterning of conductive microlines on a low glass transition temperature and transparent flexible substrate are successfully developed and demonstrated. An economic continuous wave laser at the visible wavelength was used as the guided heat source to define the conductive micropatterns. A remarkably low electrical resistivity of the copper microlines fabricated with optimized laser parameters was achieved at 4.7×10-8 Ω-m, nearly compatible to the bulk metals. Furthermore, laser reheating was used in the postprocessing of the fabricated flexible circuitry to enhance the metal-polymer interfacial adhesion strength. Up to 39% reduction of electrical resistance and up to 77% enhancement of mechanical durability after a 1000 cycle bending test could be achieved by laser postprocessing. In addition, laser drilling and via filling of the same flexible substrate were conducted by using the same laser to realize the fabrication of a multilayer interconnected flexible circuitry with single laser machining system. Thermocapillary effect, as one of the most important mechanism that affects the crater formation at the hole surface, was included in a multiphysics analysis for the laser micro-drilling process of the polymer substrate. The developed simulation model predicts the surface morphology of the microholes with reasonable accuracy. This presentation aims to provide insights to the hybrid laser additive and ablative microfabrication of polymer substrate in liquid environment, with the potential application towards a more economic and green manufacturing of flexible and 3D electronics.
LAMOM Best Student Paper Award
A cash prize will be awarded to the best student oral and poster presentation in this conference. Throughout the conference, qualifying student presentations will be evaluated by the conference committee, and the results will be announced in March. Student presentations (both oral and poster) will be judged based on scientific merit of the work, and clarity of the presentation. While the award is not judged by the manuscript, a manuscript must be submitted.

Award sponsored by:
Conference Chair
Rochester Institute of Technology (United States)
Conference Chair
National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (Japan)
Conference Chair
ALPhANOV (France)
Program Committee
Princeton Univ. (United States)
Program Committee
Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)
Program Committee
Matthias Domke
FH Vorarlberg (Austria)
Program Committee
Univ. of California, San Diego (United States)
Program Committee
Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)
Program Committee
Bos Photonics (United States)
Program Committee
The Univ. of New Mexico (United States)
Program Committee
Daetwyler Graphics AG (Switzerland)
Program Committee
Hochschule für Angewandte Wissenschaften München (Germany)
Program Committee
The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)
Program Committee
The Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries (Japan)
Program Committee
Timothy Lee
Optoelectronics Research Ctr. (United Kingdom)
Program Committee
Univ. of Nebraska-Lincoln (United States)
Program Committee
Univ. of Tsukuba (Japan)
Program Committee
Tokyo Univ. of Agriculture and Technology (Japan)
Program Committee
Univ. Politécnica de Madrid (Spain)
Program Committee
Univ. Politécnica de Madrid (Spain)
Program Committee
Osaka Univ. (Japan)
Program Committee
Berner Fachhochschule Technik und Informatik (Switzerland)
Program Committee
U.S. Naval Research Lab. (United States)
Program Committee
Ctr. for Physical Sciences and Technology (Lithuania)
Program Committee
The Australian National Univ. (Australia)
Program Committee
BLZ Bayerisches Laserzentrum GmbH (Germany)
Program Committee
Lab. Hubert Curien (France)
Program Committee
RIKEN Ctr. for Advanced Photonics (Japan)
Program Committee
Keio Univ. (Japan)
Program Committee
Purdue Univ. (United States)
Additional Information

LAMOM Best Student Paper Award



A cash prize will be awarded to the best student oral and poster presentation in this conference. Throughout the conference, qualifying student presentations will be evaluated by the conference committee, and the results will be announced in March. Student presentations (both oral and poster) will be judged based on scientific merit of the work, and clarity of the presentation. While the award is not judged by the manuscript, a manuscript must be submitted.

Award sponsored by: