LASE Plenary and Hot Topics | 3:45 PM
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SPECIAL ABSTRACT REQUIREMENTS
Submissions to this conference include the following:
  • 100-word text abstract (for online program) (REQUIRED)
  • 250-word text abstract (for abstract digest) (REQUIRED)
  • OPTIONAL: one figure and caption with preliminary results. This must be submitted as a separate PDF document.
All submissions will be reviewed by the Program Committee to determine acceptance. Abstracts and figures will be used only for the purpose of review, and will not be published.


Quantitative phase imaging (QPI) refers to measuring at each point in the field of view the optical path length shift introduced by a specimen. This measurement allows for label-free and quantitative assessment of cells and tissues. The quantitative phase images of specimens are related to their refractive index distribution, an intrinsic optical property, which plays an important role in the study of pathophysiology of many diseases. This rapidly emerging field enables the investigation of cells and tissues in terms of morphology and dynamics with nanoscale sensitivity over temporal scales from milliseconds to days. Accurate determination of intrinsic properties, optical, chemical, and mechanical, is likely to help with both basic understanding of cell function and interpretation of pathological states. Employing the principles of interferometry and holography, QPI provides unique capabilities not only for imaging, but for propagation of optical fields as well. As a result, QPI can be used to improve image quality of instruments affected by aberrations, i.e., QPI provides opportunities for non-iterative adaptive optics. With reliable phase information, an imaging instrument becomes also a powerful device for measuring light scattering. Thus, quantitative phase imaging has recently bridged the gap between the imaging and scattering disciplines. This approach is called Fourier transform light scattering, as it represents the spatial analog to Fourier transform spectroscopy. Using QPI, one can easily measure angular scattering from a single cell, which offers opportunities for label-free cell sorting.

This conference is a forum for disseminating the development of methodologies of QPI and their applications to studying specimens. The multidisciplinary nature of QPI will see this conference bring together technology and application experts in electrical and bioengineering, physics and biophysics, cell biology, analytical chemistry, clinical sciences, medical imaging, optics and photonics, and tissue engineering. We will contribute to the development of interdisciplinary bonds in supporting scientists, engineers, biologists and physicians interested in the broad field of label-free quantitative phase imaging.

Papers are solicited on biomedical optics, biophotonics methodologies and applications in the broad area of QPI. Technology development activities are expected to advance the current state of the art in, for example: spatial phase sensitivity, temporal phase sensitivity, acquisition rate, resolution, tomographic reconstruction, spectroscopic content, throughput, phase reconstruction, phase unwrapping, image processing algorithms, user friendliness, etc. Application activities are expected to target specific biological questions, including: quantifying, monitoring, and functionally assessing the normal and pathological states in live cells and tissues from subcellular to organ scales.

Relevant topics include, but are not limited to:

QPI methodologies Algorithms and Imaging Processing in QPI Deep learning and AI techniques for QPI QPI of Cell & Tissues Clinical applications of QPI ;
In progress – view active session
Conference 12389

Quantitative Phase Imaging IX

28 - 30 January 2023 | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
View Session ∨
  • 1: Memorial Session for Gabi Popescu
  • 2: QPI Algorithm I
  • 3: QPI Algorithm II
  • 4: QPI Algorithm III
  • BiOS Hot Topics
  • 5: QPI Methodologies I
  • 6: QPI Methodologies II
  • 7: QPI Algorithm IV
  • 8: QPI Methodologies III
  • Biophotonics Focus: AI/ML/DL Plenary
  • 9: QPI of Cells and Tissues I
  • 10: QPI of Cells and Tissues II
  • Posters-Monday
Session 1: Memorial Session for Gabi Popescu
28 January 2023 • 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
Session Chair: YongKeun Park, KAIST (Korea, Republic of)
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Memories of Gabi (Invited Paper)
Author(s): Yang Liu, Univ. of Pittsburgh (United States)
28 January 2023 • 9:00 AM - 9:15 AM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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Memories of Gabi (Invited Paper)
Author(s): Adam P. Wax, Duke Univ. (United States)
28 January 2023 • 9:15 AM - 9:30 AM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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Soccer and QPI with Gabi (Invited Paper)
Author(s): Keisuke Goda, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)
28 January 2023 • 9:30 AM - 9:45 AM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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I cherish my time with Gabi when we both were at MIT. He was a postdoc in the George R. Harrison Spectroscopy Laboratory led by Prof. Michael S. Feld and I was a graduate student in the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Laboratory (LIGO) led by Rainer Weiss (Nobel laureate in physics). We got to know each other, not through research meetings, but through weekly soccer activity in the physics department. Every week after soccer practice sessions, we exchanged research ideas and brainstormed how to combine our expertise, which led to the publication of an excellent joint paper on nanometer-resolved surface vibrometry of cells in Physical Review Letters. Through this process, we both learned the importance of open-mindedness for impactful collaborative research. In this talk, I will share this memory with the audience.
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Author(s): Renjie Zhou, The Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong, China)
28 January 2023 • 9:45 AM - 10:00 AM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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I will share my personal interactions with Prof. Gabriel Popescu (known as Gabi), who was a pioneer in Quantitative Phase Imaging (QPI). I will reflect my PhD years, learning QPI with Gabi. I will also share his wisdom and his passion in scientific research.
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Author(s): Pietro Ferraro, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Scienze Applicate e Sistemi Intelligenti "Eduardo Caianiello" (Italy)
28 January 2023 • 10:00 AM - 10:15 AM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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New perspectives opened by recent achievements about intracellular specificity will be presented in QPI Tomographic Cell Flow Cytometry. The possible applications in biomedical sciences will be illustrated and discussed.
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Author(s): YongKeun Park, KAIST (Korea, Republic of)
28 January 2023 • 10:15 AM - 10:30 AM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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If I had not met Gabi as my tensor, I would not have continued my research career. I was fortunate to start my graduate research projects with Gabi. In 2005, Gabi was a postdoc and I was a fresh graduate student in George R. Harrison Spectroscopy Laboratory led by Prof. Michael S. Feld. My very first research project was the combination of QPI and fluorescence imaging, which was supervised by Gabi. I have learned physics, optics, and more importantly attitude towards research and life, from Gabi. We have discussed numerous interesting ideas over beer, which shaped my current research fields. In this talk, I will share the early research results I have worked with Gabi 15 years ago, and the latest research progress which was inspired and influenced from Gabi.
Break
Coffee Break 10:30 AM - 11:00 AM
Session 2: QPI Algorithm I
28 January 2023 • 10:50 AM - 12:20 PM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
Session Chair: Peter T. C. So, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
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Author(s): Lei Tian, Boston Univ. (United States)
28 January 2023 • 10:50 AM - 11:20 AM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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I will discuss our efforts of pushing the limit of computational phase tomography. I will discuss Intensity Diffraction Tomography (IDT) for quantitative 3D phase imaging. IDT can be easily implemented in a standard microscope equipped with a programmable light source, making it easily accessible to the biological research community. I will present both physical model and deep learning strategies for improving the imaging capabilities of IDT for handling complex 3D biological samples. Finally, I will present a novel technique of combining IDT and mid-infrared photothermal imaging to enable Bond-selective phase tomography.
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Author(s): Geon Kim, KAIST (Korea, Republic of); Daewoong Ahn, Tomocube, Inc. (Korea, Republic of); Minhee Kang, SAMSUNG Medical Ctr. (Korea, Republic of); Jinho Park, KAIST (Korea, Republic of); DongHun Ryu, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); YoungJu Jo, Stanford Univ. (United States); Jinyeop Song, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); Jea Sung Ryu, KAIST (Korea, Republic of); Gunho Choi, Hyun Jung Chung, Tomocube, Inc. (Korea, Republic of); Kyuseok Kim, CHA Bundang Medical Ctr. (Korea, Republic of); Doo Ryeon Chung, SAMSUNG Medical Ctr. (Korea, Republic of); In Young Yoo, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Hee Jae Huh, SAMSUNG Medical Ctr. (Korea, Republic of); Hyun-seok Min, Tomocube, Inc. (Korea, Republic of); Nam Yong Lee, SAMSUNG Medical Ctr. (Korea, Republic of); YongKeun Park, KAIST (Korea, Republic of)
28 January 2023 • 11:20 AM - 11:40 AM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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Rapid identification of infectious pathogens can save lives and mitigate healthcare expenses. Yet the current turnaround time for microbial identification typically exceeds 24 hours, as the common methods require the cultivation of millions or more bacteria to detect the collective signal. In this study, we propose a hybrid framework of quantitative phase imaging and artificial neural network to facilitate rapid identification at an individual-cell level. Specifically, three-dimensional images of refractive index were acquired for individual bacteria, and an optimized artificial neural network determined the species based on the three-dimensional morphologies, securing 82.5% blind test accuracy at an individual-cell level.
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Author(s): Eddie M. Gil, Texas A&M Univ. (United States); Zachary A. Steelman, Joel N. Bixler, Air Force Research Lab. (United States)
28 January 2023 • 12:00 PM - 12:20 PM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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Quantitative phase imaging is a useful tool for measuring mass-sensitive morphological changes and growth in neurons. Image segmentation is necessary to accurately measure such information. Neural networks are state of the art for this task but require thousands of images to generalize. Previously, we trained neural networks on low complexity neuron growth simulations to forgo a large experimentally acquired data set. Here, we generate training data from cells cropped from a 10-image sample. We observe an improved dice coefficient between the ground truth and network output, and a reduced dry mass error after training on these procedurally generated images.
Break
Lunch/Exhibition Break 12:20 PM - 1:30 PM
Session 3: QPI Algorithm II
28 January 2023 • 1:30 PM - 2:30 PM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
Session Chair: Renjie Zhou, The Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong, China)
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Author(s): Udith Haputhanthri, Kithmini Herath, Ramith Hettiarachchi, Hasindu Kariyawasam, Harvard Univ. (United States); Azeem Ahmad, Balpreet Singh . Ahluwalia, UiT The Arctic Univ. of Norway (Norway); Chamira U. S. Edussooriya, Univ. of Moratuwa (Sri Lanka); Dushan N. Wadduwage, Harvard Univ. (United States)
28 January 2023 • 1:30 PM - 1:50 PM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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With applications ranging from metabolomics to histopathology, quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) is a powerful label-free imaging modality. However, the speed of current QPM systems is limited by electronic hardware. To improve throughput further, here we propose differentiable optical-electronic quantitative phase microscopy (∂μ) that acquires images in a compressed form such that more information can be transferred beyond the electronic hardware bottleneck. The proposed microscopy uses optical feature extractors as image compressors. The resultant intensity distribution is then decompressed into QPM images by a reconstruction network. By optimizing optical-electronic parameters in an end-to-end manner, our method can improve the QPI throughput from Hours to Seconds (more than an order of magnitude).
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Author(s): Hyewon Cho, Nurbolat Aimakov, Inwoo Park, Myeonghoon Choi, Yerim Kim, Geosong Na, Sunghoon Lim, Woonggyu Jung, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)
28 January 2023 • 1:50 PM - 2:10 PM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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A novel multi-modal label-free imaging system is proposed for histopathology, which provides uniformly reconstructed virtual-stained brightfield images and corresponding QPI images. The system was tested on urinal histopathology, to detect and segment glomerulus. From each modality, over 90% of IoU scores were obtained and accelerated performance was obtained through multi-modal learning. Briefly, histopathology quantification with label-free samples is a feasible method via the proposed novel system.
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Author(s): Jiawei Sun, Nektarios Koukourakis, Juergen Czarske, TU Dresden (Germany)
28 January 2023 • 2:10 PM - 2:30 PM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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Quantitative phase imaging (QPI) is an emerging label-free biomedical imaging modality. However, achieving high-fidelity QPI through an optical multicore fiber remains challenging. We demonstrate a novel phase reconstruction algorithm tailored for QPI through a lens-free multicore fiber (MCF) with a diameter of less than half a millimeter. Furthermore, the resolution of the reconstructed image can reach 1 micron in the lateral direction and nanoscale sensitivity in the axial direction. Moreover, deep learning is implemented to boost the reconstruction process, enabling an ultra-fast imaging rate of 180 fps. This powerful ultra-thin QPI probe could open new perspectives for endoscopic imaging.
Session 4: QPI Algorithm III
28 January 2023 • 2:30 PM - 4:50 PM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
Session Chairs: YongKeun Park, KAIST (Korea, Republic of), Yang Liu, Univ. of Pittsburgh (United States)
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Author(s): Liangcai Cao, Yunhui Gao, Tsinghua Univ. (China)
28 January 2023 • 2:30 PM - 3:00 PM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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The imaging quality of in-line digital holography is challenged by the twin-image and aliasing effects because sensors only respond to intensity and pixels are of finite size. As a result, phase retrieval and pixel super-resolution techniques serve as the two essential ingredients for high-fidelity holographic imaging. In this work, we combine the two within a unified algorithmic framework. Pixel super-resolution phase retrieval is recast as an optimization problem and is solved via gradient descent-based algorithms. Regularization techniques and Nesterov's momentum are introduced to further speed up data acquisition and iterative reconstruction. The proposed algorithms are verified through a proof-of-concept lensless on-chip microscope. We demonstrate experimentally the capability of pixel super-resolution phase retrieval techniques in revealing the subpixel and quantitative phase information of complex biological samples.
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Author(s): Luzhe Huang, Xilin Yang, Tairan Liu, Aydogan Ozcan, UCLA Samueli School of Engineering (United States)
28 January 2023 • 3:00 PM - 3:20 PM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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We report a novel few-shot transfer learning scheme based on a convolutional recurrent neural network architecture, which was used for holographic image reconstruction. Without sacrificing the hologram reconstruction accuracy and quality, this few-shot transfer learning scheme effectively reduced the number of trainable parameters during the transfer learning process by ~90% and improved the convergence speed by 2.5-fold over baseline models. This method can be applied to other deep learning-based computational microscopy and holographic imaging tasks, and facilitates the transfer learning of models to new types of samples with minimal training time and data.
Coffee Break 3:20 PM - 3:50 PM
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Author(s): Hasindu Kariyawasam, Ramith Hettiarachchi, Harvard Univ. (United States), Univ. of Moratuwa (Sri Lanka); Quansan Yang, Massachusetts Insutitute of Technology (United States); Udith Haputhanthri, Kithmini Herath, Harvard Univ. (United States), Univ. of Moratuwa (Sri Lanka); Chamira U. S. Edussooriya, Univ. of Moratuwa (Sri Lanka); Edward Boyden, Peter T. C. So, Massachusetts Insutitute of Technology (United States); Dushan N. Wadduwage, Harvard Univ. (United States)
28 January 2023 • 3:50 PM - 4:10 PM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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Since its introduction, diffractive deep neural networks (D2NN) have been an emerging technology with many useful applications, such as 3D object recognition, saliency segmentation, and quantitative phase microscopy. However, fabricating D2NNs operating in the visible range has not been performed due to the complexities of fabricating nano-scale elements. Recent advancements such as Implosion Fabrication have made it possible to fabricate such networks using a discrete number of phase weights. We propose a quantization-aware training approach for D2NNs through modeling the quantization process in a differentiable manner using a sigmoid-based quantization function, facilitating the fabrication process. We also propose an efficient training schedule to guide the optimization process to converge to a better minima despite the limited number of quantization levels. Our method is simulated and validated for an all-optical quantitative phase microscopy task based on the phase D2NN.
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Author(s): Mohamed Haouat, Céline Larivière-Loiselle, Ctr. de Recherche CERVO (Canada), Univ. Laval (Canada); Maxime Moreaud, Ctr. de Recherche CERVO (Canada), IFP Energies Nouvelles (France), MINES ParisTech (France); Erik Bélanger, Pierre P. Marquet, Ctr. de Recherche CERVO (Canada), Univ. Laval (Canada)
28 January 2023 • 4:10 PM - 4:30 PM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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Polychromatic digital holographic microscopy (P-DHM) has proven its capacity to provide quasi-coherent noise-free quantitative-phase images, allowing a high-quality visualization of cell structure. In this work we propose a fully automated hologram reconstruction methodology, including a fast-numerical approach for the correction of the defocusing resulting from both the axial chromatic aberrations as well as the fluctuations of the optomechanical elements. This methodology able to reconstruct a large number of holograms paves the way to develop a time-resolved P-DHM capable of non-invasively visualizing both the fine cell structure and dynamics.
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Author(s): Johan Chaniot, Maxime Moreaud, Céline Larivière-Loiselle, Mohamed Haouat, Marie-Ève Crochetière, Erik Bélanger, Pierre P. Marquet, Ctr. de Recherche CERVO (Canada)
28 January 2023 • 4:30 PM - 4:50 PM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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Digital holographic microscopy (DHM), provides an extremely sensitive quantitative-phase signal (QPS), which is nevertheless affected by coherent noise. The recent development of polychromatic DHM (P-DHM) enables us to provide quasi-coherent-noise-free quantitative-phase images. The implementation of P-DHM remains, however, demanding. We propose a convolutional neural network architecture, using for the first time an experimental ground-truth dataset, performing the P-DHM denoising from conventional DHM images. The results highlight, a strong efficiency, fine subcellular structures are made visible without loss of QPS accuracy, an interest in comparison to state-of-the-art learning methods and the possibility of a more widespread use of the P-DHM.
BiOS Hot Topics
28 January 2023 • 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM PST | Moscone Center, Room 207/215 (Level 2 South)
Every year at BiOS the community gathers at Saturday Night Hot Topics to hear the latest innovations in the biophotonics field. Don't miss this year's fast-paced program of world-class speakers.

VIEW PROGRAM
Session 5: QPI Methodologies I
29 January 2023 • 8:30 AM - 10:20 AM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
Session Chair: Yang Liu, Univ. of Pittsburgh (United States)
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Author(s): Balpreet Singh Ahluwalia, Azeem Ahmad, Vishesh Kumar Dubey, Ankit Butola, UiT The Arctic Univ. of Norway (Norway)
29 January 2023 • 8:30 AM - 9:00 AM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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We report high-speed and highly sensitive quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) using dynamic speckle illumination (DSI). The DSI-QPM is used for real-time analyses of highly motile human spermatozoa. The DSI-QPM supports high-speed and high spatial phase sensitivity, that are crucial for imaging tail (nanoscale) of living spermatozoa during motion. The scalable FoV and high temporal coherence offered by DSI-QPM is harnessed for histopathology and marine biology. Further, by integrating the single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) with QPM, nanoscale imaging and quantification in lateral (via SMLM) and axial (via QPM) directions was achieved on liver cells.
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Author(s): Yuechuan Lin, Xiang Zhang, Rebecca E. Zubajlo, Zahid Yaqoob, Brian W. Anthony, Peter T. C. So, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
29 January 2023 • 9:00 AM - 9:20 AM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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We present an acoustic-driven quantitative phase microscope for quantifying cell biomechanics at sub-cellular level. Longitudinal acoustic standing wave is established as mechanical loadings to deform cells. A reflection quantitative phase microscopy with high axial and lateral resolution is used to quantify the cell deformations. We evaluate cancerous and normal cells undergoing standing wave modulation, where both the time-lapse cell membrane fluctuations and whole-cell volumetric shape changes are measured. Our technique can achieve high throughput, label-free and non-invasive quantification of cell mechanics with high mechanical sensitivity over broad mechanical frequency response range and can potentially be extended to study 3D tissue mechanics with sub-cellular resolution.
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Author(s): Paloma Casteleiro Costa, Zhe Guang, Nischita Kaza, Francisco E. Robles, Georgia Institute of Technology (United States)
29 January 2023 • 9:20 AM - 9:40 AM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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Quantitative oblique back illumination microscopy (qOBM) is a 3D quantitative phase imaging technique that yields cross-sectional phase information of thick scattering samples. Because qOBM is an epi-mode technology, it is well suited for in-vivo application; however, its potential utility is hindered by the speed of the system, which is limited by the number of captures required to reconstruct the quantitative phase. In this work, we introduce single capture qOBM (SC-qOBM) enabled by deep learning. SC-qOBM enables imaging speeds limited only by the camera frame rate (e.g., 1 kHz), providing access to motion-free in-vivo imaging and fast dynamic biological processes.
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Author(s): Osamu Yasuhiko, Kozo Takeuchi, Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. (Japan)
29 January 2023 • 9:40 AM - 10:00 AM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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Visualization of refractive index (RI) distribution of thick specimens is challenging due to multiple-scattering and sample-induced aberration caused by the inhomogeneity of the sample. Here, we propose a novel RI reconstruction method that overcoming these detrimental effects by partial reconstruction of RI distribution and computational wave backpropagation through the partial RI distribution. Exploiting this computational approach, we demonstrate the subcellular-resolution visualization of multicellular spheroid with a diameter of 140 µm. We further introduce the latest results on various cell-type spheroids with different morphology that demonstrate the generalizability of this approach, and discuss applicability to biomedical fields.
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Author(s): Maria Baczewska, Warsaw Univ. of Technology (Poland); Milena Królikowska, Univ. of Warsaw (Poland); Wojciech Krauze, Małgorzata Kujawińska, Warsaw Univ. of Technology (Poland)
29 January 2023 • 10:00 AM - 10:20 AM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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Yokukansan (SNY), chinese herbs, have wide-ranging effects at the cellular level, especially on brain cells. In order to expand our knowledge of the effects of SNY on neuronal cells, we used holographic tomography (HT) combined with Raman micro-spectroscopy to analyse influence of different doses of SNY on cells organelles quantitatively and chemically, based on SHSY-5Y neuroblastoma cells. The combination of these two techniques provides the opportunity to identify and characterise individual cells of the nervous system under label-free conditions, which is becoming a significant advantage in biomedical and clinical research where intact and unmodified cells are required.
Break
Coffee Break 10:20 AM - 10:50 AM
Session 6: QPI Methodologies II
29 January 2023 • 10:50 AM - 12:20 PM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
Session Chair: Pietro Ferraro, Istituto di Scienze Applicate e Sistemi Intelligenti "Eduardo Caianiello" (Italy)
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Author(s): Kyungwon Lee, Kyung Chul Lee, Jaewoo Jung, Hyesuk Chae, Seung Ah Lee, Yonsei Univ. (Korea, Republic of)
29 January 2023 • 10:50 AM - 11:20 AM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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Fourier ptychography (FP) utilizes angle-varied illumination to achieve resolution improvement and quantitative phase imaging. In this talk, we present a compact microscope using an OLED screen as a programmable illumination for FP reconstruction. We discuss multiplexed reconstruction strategy using multi-pixel illuminations, and a stand-alone smartphone implementation of portable FPM.
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Author(s): Michal Ziemczonok, Malgorzata Kujawinska, Warsaw Univ. of Technology (Poland)
29 January 2023 • 11:20 AM - 11:40 AM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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QPI in biomedical applications span a wide range of measurement challenges ranging from sub-µm features in monolayer of cells to cm^2 cell cultures, free-floating and three-dimensional cell clusters or even whole organisms. In this work we show how to create phantoms that strive to mimic all kinds of said specimens and their interaction with light. We use two-photon polymerization technique to adjust three-dimensional shape, size, refractive index modulation and scattering properties. Finally, we demonstrate how to utilize such phantoms to gain insight about the metrological performance of the QPI systems.
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Author(s): Zhe Guang, Georgia Institute of Technology (United States); Amunet Jacobs, Agnes Scott College (United States); Paloma Casteleiro Costa, Caroline Filan, Francisco E. Robles, Georgia Institute of Technology (United States)
29 January 2023 • 11:40 AM - 12:00 PM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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Quantitative oblique back-illumination microscopy (qOBM) enables quantitative phase imaging (QPI) in thick samples using epi-illumination. While qOBM offers unique access to refractive index information in-vivo, QPI-based pathology still suffers from low cell nuclear contrast, which is an invaluable for disease detection, including cancer. In this work, we use the acetowhitening effect of acetic acid to enhance the nuclear phase contrast of thick fresh tissue samples. Imaging results from brain and liver samples will be presented. Acetic acid phase staining may have important implications for in-vivo QPI-based disease detection.
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Author(s): Chungha Lee, Hugonnet Herve, Mahn Jae Lee, Weisun Park, YongKeun Park, KAIST (Korea, Republic of)
29 January 2023 • 12:00 PM - 12:20 PM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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Quantitative phase imaging (QPI) techniques require multiple measurements to obtain the refractive index (RI) distribution of a sample. Here, we present a single-shot RI imaging method using spectral multiplexing and optical transfer function reshaping. In the present method, we simultaneously measure three intensity images of a sample with three optimized illumination patterns. Deconvolution of the measured intensity images is then performed to obtain the RI distribution of the sample. As a proof-of-concept, we measured both microspheres and biological cells.
Break
Lunch/Exhibition Break 12:20 PM - 1:20 PM
Session 7: QPI Algorithm IV
29 January 2023 • 1:20 PM - 3:10 PM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
Session Chairs: Yang Liu, Univ. of Pittsburgh (United States), YongKeun Park, KAIST (Korea, Republic of)
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Author(s): Shwetadwip Chowdhury, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
29 January 2023 • 1:20 PM - 1:50 PM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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Optical imaging is a major tool in the basic sciences, and provides both morphological and molecular-specific imaging capabilities. Unfortunately, optical scattering is a major obstacle for high-resolution imaging because scattering scrambles object-specific information. I present some of our recent developments that utilize concepts from computational phase-retrieval and physics-based iterative solvers to image through scattering samples. The two main application spaces we target is 1) using optical-scattering to enable large space-bandwidth imaging, and 2) computationally decoding 3D tissue scattering.
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Author(s): Deniz Mengu, Aydogan Ozcan, UCLA Samueli School of Engineering (United States)
29 January 2023 • 1:50 PM - 2:10 PM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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We report diffractive optical networks to replace the digital image reconstruction schemes in quantitative phase imaging (QPI) systems with a series of passive diffractive surfaces that perform phase recovery all-optically, completing the reconstruction of the QPI signal as the light is diffracted through thin structured layers. A diffractive QPI network all-optically maps the input phase information into an intensity distribution that reveals the QPI signal at the speed of light. With their compact footprint, diffractive QPI networks offer ultra-fast all-optical computation and low-power operation, demonstrating a new phase imaging concept that can be especially transformative for on-chip microscopy and sensing.
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Author(s): Carlos Trujillo, Univ. EAFIT (Colombia); Ana Doblas, Raul Castañeda, The Univ. of Memphis (United States)
29 January 2023 • 2:10 PM - 2:30 PM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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This contribution presents a joint phase compensation and autofocusing method for telecentric off-axis Digital Holographic Microscopy (DHM). Current challenges of off-axis DHM systems ap-plied to in-vivo imaging are the automatic reconstruction of phase images without phase distor-tions while the specimens under research move within the volume, generating out-of-focus holo-grams. Although different proposals to tackle these challenges individually have been reported for static samples, in this proposal, both issues are solved concurrently with no additional user inter-vention. As a result, in-focus compensated phase images of the out-of-focus studied samples are obtained. The proposal has been validated using simulated and experimental data.
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Author(s): Brian Bogue-Jimenez, The Univ. of Memphis (United States); Carlos Trujillo, Univ. EAFIT (Colombia); Ana Doblas, The Univ. of Memphis (United States)
29 January 2023 • 2:30 PM - 2:50 PM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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Digital Holographic Microscopy (DHM) is a quantitative phase imaging method with many applications. Most DHM systems operate in the non-telecentric regime, needing to compensate physically or computationally for a spherical wavefront to provide ac-curate quantitative phase measurements. In this work, we outline the steps for the au-tomatic reconstruction of phase images without distortions from a hologram recorded in a non-telecentric DHM system. Our reconstruction method has been validated ex-perimentally using different DHM systems. In each step of the method, we have identi-fied the relevant metrics, compared multiple approaches, and selected the one with higher performance for all our experimental holograms.
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29 January 2023 • 2:50 PM - 3:10 PM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
Break
Coffee Break 3:10 PM - 3:40 PM
Session 8: QPI Methodologies III
29 January 2023 • 3:40 PM - 5:30 PM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
Session Chair: Shwetadwip Chowdhury, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
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Author(s): Shikhar Uttam, Univ. of Pittsburgh (United States)
29 January 2023 • 3:40 PM - 4:10 PM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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Nanoscale nuclear architecture mapping (nanoNAM) is a label free imaging method based on the Fourier phase of Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography. It is capable of capturing, with nanoscale sensitivity, preneoplastic alterations in nuclear architecture of normal appearing cells undergoing malignant transformation both in animal models of carcinogenesis and human patients. In this talk I will present its theory and implementation from first principles and demonstrate its utility in a range of cancer settings. I will further present our recent results on testing the hypothesis that the ability of nanoNAM to capture early-stage malignant transformation is due to its sensitivity to the underlying aberrant structural alterations associated with chromatin remodeling during early stages of carcinogenesis. I will conclude by discussing its potential for use in the clinic.
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Author(s): Hanlong Chen, Luzhe Huang, Tairan Liu, Aydogan Ozcan, Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States)
29 January 2023 • 4:10 PM - 4:30 PM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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We demonstrate a deep learning-based framework, called Fourier Imager Network (FIN), which achieves unparalleled generalization in end-to-end phase-recovery and hologram reconstruction. We used Fourier transform modules in FIN architecture, which process the spatial frequencies of the input images in a global receptive field and bring strong regularization and robustness to the hologram reconstruction task. We validated FIN by training it on human lung tissue samples and blindly testing it on human prostate, salivary gland, and Pap smear samples. FIN exhibits superior internal and external generalization compared with existing hologram reconstruction models, also achieving a ~50-fold acceleration in image inference speed.
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Author(s): Yunhui Gao, Liangcai Cao, Tsinghua Univ. (China)
29 January 2023 • 4:30 PM - 4:50 PM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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Existing quantitative phase imaging (QPI) techniques are faced with an inherent trade-off between phase imaging fidelity and temporal resolution. Here, we propose a general algorithmic framework for QPI reconstruction that enables frame-rate-limited holographic imaging. It takes an inverse problem approach by formulating phase retrieval as a nonsmooth nonconvex optimization problem. Efficient solvers for the problem are derived whose algorithmic behaviors have been studied from both theoretical and experimental perspectives. The proposed framework is applicable to various existing holographic imaging configurations, and makes it possible to incorporate advanced image priors for quality enhancement.
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Author(s): Juheon Lee, KAIST (Korea, Republic of); Seungwoo Shin, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara (United States); Herve Hugonnet, KAIST (Korea, Republic of); YongKeun Park, KAIST (Korea, Republic of), Tomocube, Inc. (Korea, Republic of)
29 January 2023 • 4:50 PM - 5:10 PM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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The dielectric tensor is a physical quantity which characterizes birefringent materials with principal refractive indices and orientations of optic axes. Recently, three-dimensional dielectric tensor distribution was directly measured using dielectric tensor tomography (DTT). However, since the original DTT uses two cameras to acquire polarization-sensitive fields, position disagreement between the two fields deteriorates reconstruction quality. Here, we present multiplexed DTT using only one camera. To avoid the position disagreement, we exploit holographic multiplexing, interfering two orthogonally polarized reference beams with a sample beam on the camera. We validate the present method via measurement of anisotropic structures in liquid crystal particles.
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Author(s): Alex C. Matlock, Yuhao Qiang, Ming Dao, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); John Higgins, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States); Zahid Yaqoob, Peter T. C. So, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
29 January 2023 • 5:10 PM - 5:30 PM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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We present the interferometric phase and absorption microscope (iPAM) platform for studying the biomechanics and fitness of sickle red blood cells (sRBCs). iPAM combines diffraction phase microscopy, tailored imaging media with customized optical properties, and extinction-based models to extract sRBC hemoglobin concentration and 3D structure from hundreds of cells in a single snapshot. Coupled with a customized microfluidic platform controlling cell deformation and oxygenation, we show that iPAM can provide a fitness index evaluating sRBC health that could act as an indicator detecting vaso-occlusive crisis risk and determine sickle cell disease treatment effectiveness.
Biophotonics Focus: AI/ML/DL Plenary
29 January 2023 • 7:00 PM - 8:35 PM PST | Moscone Center, Room 207/215 (Level 2 South)
View plenary session details.
Session 9: QPI of Cells and Tissues I
30 January 2023 • 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
Session Chair: YongKeun Park, KAIST (Korea, Republic of)
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Author(s): Thomas A. Zangle, The Univ. of Utah (United States)
30 January 2023 • 8:30 AM - 9:00 AM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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Measuring cancer cell response to therapy is an essential component of developing new therapies or determining the optimal treatment for a particular patient. In this talk I will discuss the use of quantitative phase imaging (QPI) to measure the distribution of mass within single cells, and how this distribution changes over time. Based on this approach, my lab has developed new approaches to quantify the time-dependence and intracellular spatial distribution of cell response to small-molecule inhibitors. These data can be used to study basic cell physiology, as well as how cancer cells respond to therapies.
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Author(s): Mahn Jae Lee, Geon Kim, Moosung Lee, Jeongwon Shin, KAIST (Korea, Republic of); Jung Ho Lee, School of Medicine, CHA Univ. (Korea, Republic of); DongHun Ryu, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); Young Seo Kim, Yoonjae Chung, KAIST (Korea, Republic of); Kyuseok Kim, School of Medicine, CHA Univ. (Korea, Republic of); YongKeun Park, KAIST (Korea, Republic of)
30 January 2023 • 9:00 AM - 9:20 AM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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Accurate and rapid evaluation of dynamic immune status is critical to determine therapeutic modalities for sepsis patients, which is impeded by the limitations of conventional diagnostic tools. Here, we employ refractive index tomography to quantitatively assess the immune status of human monocytes in a label-free manner. Measurement of refractive index tomograms enabled quantifications of three-dimensional morphological parameters, which revealed a clear increment in lipid droplets content and intracellular inhomogeneities as the septic stage progresses. We leveraged these observations to engineer a deep-learning-based algorithm that predicts the immune status of monocytes, showing over 99 % blind test accuracy.
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Author(s): David R. Steike, Michael Hessler, Burkhard Greve, Björn Kemper, Westfälische Wilhelms-Univ. Münster (Germany)
30 January 2023 • 9:20 AM - 9:40 AM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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In a prospective observational pilot study, we evaluated label-free quantitative phase imaging (QPI) with digital holographic microscopy (DHM) as a tool to describe changes in biophysical properties of lymphocytes and monocytes after cardiac surgery. The results of our study show the capability of DHM to quantify perioperative lymphocyte and monocyte alternations in cardiac surgery patients. The patterns of biophysical DHM data correlated with laboratory parameters, flow cytometric cell markers, and postoperative course. This exemplifies DHM as a promising tool to characterize and assess inflammatory processes and course of disease.
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Author(s): David G. Grier, New York University (United States)
30 January 2023 • 9:40 AM - 10:10 AM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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Holographic particle characterization uses in-line holographic microscopy as a platform to measure the three-dimensional positions, diameters and refractive indexes of individual micrometer-scale colloidal particles dispersed in their native fluid media. This wealth of information is extracted by treating hologram analysis as an inverse problem whose solution is guided by a generative model for the image formation process. A recently released machine-learning implementation can track an individual particle with nanometer precision over a range of 100 micrometers, can distinguish particles by composition with part-per-thousand precision and yields the diameter of individual colloidal spheres with nanometer precision. Holographic characterization therefore can monitor probe beads growing as molecules bind to their surfaces. We use this technique to demonstrate label-free bead-based holographic assays for antibodies and for antigenic proteins from pathogenic viruses, including SARS-CoV-2 and H1N1 influenza virus. These studies not only introduce holographic binding assays as a new platform for rapid and cost-effective diagnostic testing, but also quantitatively validate the effective-medium analysis of molecular-scale coatings on colloidal probe beads. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation through Award Number DMR-2027013 and by the National Institutes of Health through Award Number R44TR001590.
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Author(s): Anne Marzi, Kai Moritz Eder, Biomedizinisches Technologiezentrum, Westfälische Wilhelms-Univ. Münster (Germany); Álvaro Barroso, Biomedizinisches Technologiezentrum (BMTZ) der Medizinischen Fakultät (Germany); Ane Marit Wågbø, Torkild Visnes, Ruth B. Schmid, Geir Klinkenberg, SINTEF Industry (Norway); Björn Kemper, Jürgen Schnekenburger, Biomedizinisches Technologiezentrum (BMTZ) der Medizinischen Fakultät (Germany)
30 January 2023 • 10:10 AM - 10:30 AM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) has proven to be a suitable label-free and non-invasive quantitative phase imaging (QPI) tool in risk assessment by evaluating the cytotoxic potential of engineered nanoparticles and organic nanocarriers. In a further step, robustness of DHM-based assays needs to be demonstrated towards DHM standardization in risk assessment. Thus, we performed an interlaboratory comparison on the transferability and reproducibility of a DHM-based assay. The cytotoxic potential of organic nanoparticles on A549 lung epithelial cells was analyzed in two european laboratories using identically constructed DHM systems. Our results demonstrate a solid and accurate performance of the DHM-based cytotoxicity assay.
Break
Coffee Break 10:30 AM - 11:00 AM
Session 10: QPI of Cells and Tissues II
30 January 2023 • 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
Session Chair: Yang Liu, Univ. of Pittsburgh (United States)
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Author(s): Ljiljana Durdevic, Guillaume Baffou, Institut Fresnel (France)
30 January 2023 • 11:00 AM - 11:20 AM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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Cross-grating phase microscopy (CGM) is a wavefront imaging technique that can map the intensity and phase of a light beam with high sensitivity and spatial resolution. CGM is based on the association of a 2D-grating with a camera, separated by a millimetric distance. In this contribution, we will show how CGM can measure the dry mass of single neurites of neural cells in culture, and how it can highlight the subtle dynamics and mass transport within neurites, in a label-free manner.
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Author(s): Dickson Siu, Victor M.L. Wong, Sum Lau, Bei Wang, Alan S.L. Wong, Kenneth K.Y. Wong, Kevin K. Tsia, The Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong, China)
30 January 2023 • 11:20 AM - 11:40 AM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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We developed a large-scale single-cell intrinsic morphological profiling strategy using ultrahigh-throughput quantitative phase imaging (QPI) combined with a novel spinning on-the-fly cell-based assay platform. This integrated system demonstrates the unprecedented functional assay capability of QPI in not only scaling up the assay throughput, but also empowering new cytometric power to perform multiplexed live-cell drug screening (96 conditions in a single run) and genetic perturbation assay (by CRISPR). This platform thus allows generation of large cellular QPI datasets (4.85 TByte in this study) that could spearhead cost-effective label-free solutions for identifying disease-or gene-related cellular morphological phenotypes in therapeutics screening.
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Author(s): Caroline Filan, Hannah Song, Manu Platt, Francisco E. Robles, Georgia Institute of Technology (United States)
30 January 2023 • 11:40 AM - 12:00 PM PST | Moscone Center, Room 155 (Upper Mezzanine South)
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Quantitative Oblique Back-Illumination microscopy is a label-free imaging technique that enables three-dimensional phase imaging of thick samples with epi-illumination. Here, we present a preliminary study using qOBM to monitor sickle cell disease in mice. We have used qOBM to image the brains of recently sacrificed PBS-perfused mice with sickle cell disease. Through the quantitative phase images obtained, we observe morphological differences in the blood vessel structure coupled with blockages of cortex vessels where potential strokes occurred. We demonstrate that qOBM enables visualizing these differences with future applications in the in-vivo monitoring of sickle cell blood flow.
Posters-Monday
30 January 2023 • 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM PST | Moscone Center, Level 2 West
Conference attendees are invited to attend the Monday BiOS poster session. Come view the posters, enjoy light refreshments, ask questions, and network with colleagues in your field.

Poster Setup: Monday10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
View poster presentation guidelines and set-up instructions at:
https://spie.org/PW/Poster-Guidelines
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Author(s): Xiantao Jiang, Nansen Zhou, Yijin Wang, Renjie Zhou, The Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong, China)
On demand | Presenting live 30 January 2023
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Recently, speckle illumination has been used for resolution improvement with different optical sketches. However, the imaging process and the manipulation of speckle generation remain elusive. Here, we proposed a speckle generation model by using diffraction theory in the k-space to optimize the speckle particle size that regulates the imaging resolution. Angular information encoded speckles have been generated and optimized using perfect optical vortex (POV) beams to improve the imaging resolution up to 1.5 folds. Label-free three-dimension (3D) high-resolution imaging and quantitative phase imaging are demonstrated on different cell types.
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Author(s): Akanshu Chauhan, Nedup Sherpa, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati (India); Nagendra Kumar, Byers Eye Institute, Stanford Univ. (United States); Pranjal Choudhury, Bosanta R. Boruah, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati (India); Satya Siddharta Goutam Buddha, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (India)
30 January 2023 • 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM PST | Moscone Center, Level 2 West
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Zernike aberration modes when expressed as discrete functions are not perfectly orthogonal. This becomes more prominent in reconstructed phases employing various phase retrieval methods. In this paper, we use Zonal Wavefront sensor (ZWFS) and Transport of Intensity Equation (TIE) to reconstruct the phase and determine the orthogonality between the reconstructed Zernike modes. We further investigate how the discrete representation of these modes and changes in the number of zones in ZWFS affect their orthogonality. Finally, we compare the orthogonality results between the ZWFS and TIE approaches.
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Author(s): Jeongsoo Kim, Seungri Song, Hongseong Kim, Yonsei Univ. (Korea, Republic of); Daesuk Kim, Jeonbuk National Univ. (Korea, Republic of); Chulmin Joo, Yonsei Univ. (Korea, Republic of)
30 January 2023 • 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM PST | Moscone Center, Level 2 West
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We present a novel form of polarization-sensitive microscopy, which allows for scanner-free, large-area, high-resolution birefringence imaging without any lenses. Our method, termed polarization-sensitive ptychographic lens-less microscope (PS-PtychoLM), adopts the high-resolution, large field of view (FoV) imaging capability of a mask-modulated ptychographic lens-less imager with a single-input-state illumination and polarization-diverse imaging system. Using a camera with a pixel resolution of 3.45 μm, our method achieves birefringence imaging with a half-pitch resolution of 2.46 μm over 59.74 mm^2 FoV. We demonstrate high-resolution, large-area birefringence imaging capability of our method by presenting the birefringence images of various anisotropic objects including birefringent resolution target, liquid crystal polymer depolarizer, and monosodium urate crystal.
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Author(s): Xin Shu, Yi Zhang, Mengxuan Niu, Renjie Zhou, Hongfei Zhu, The Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong, China)
On demand | Presenting live 30 January 2023
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Deep learning has been applied to phase retrieval to simplify post-processing procedures in quantitative phase imaging. Based on Neural Architecture Search (NAS), we present a new NAS generated Phase Retrieval Net, termed NAS-PRNet, which can achieve fast and accurate phase retrieval in off-axis QPI. NAS-PRNet does not need a calibration phase map and separated phase unwrapping step, thus greatly simplifying the imaging procedures. After training, the identified NAS-PRNet obtained a Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio (PSNR) of 36.7 dB and a Structural SIMilarity (SSIM) of 0.866, which are comparable with U-Net, while the phase map inference time is 12 times less than that of U-Net, making it a promising method for real-time phase retrieval in off-axis QPI.
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Author(s): Yi Zhang, Yujie Nie, Xin Shu, The Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong, China); Chengsong Ye, Xin Yu, Xiamen Univ. (China); Renjie Zhou, The Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong, China)
On demand | Presenting live 30 January 2023
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Bacterial viability assessment is critical in determining the microbial risk to the public health, yet current methods are either time-consuming or exogenous labeled. Here, we propose an end-to-end bacteria viability assay on unlabeled cells using quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) with deep learning. With the implementation of a segmentation algorithm and a deep learning model, the proposed method achieves 95% accuracy when classifying the unlabeled live and dead bacterial cells. The rapid, label-free, cost-effective and accurate assessment capabilities may broaden the applications in the fields of environmental ecology and microbiology.
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Author(s): Siqi Yang, Shwetadwip Chowdhury, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
30 January 2023 • 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM PST | Moscone Center, Level 2 West
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Optical diffraction tomography (ODT) provides intrinsic and high-resolution structural information of biological samples with 3D refractive-index contrast. To do so, ODT captures multiple scattering measurements of the sample at different illumination angles, and then utilizes computational algorithms to reconstruct 3D refractive-index. We previously built a non-interferometric ODT system with a scanning mirror to rotate the beam. However, the mechanical scanning setup greatly limited acquisition speeds. Here, we introduce a new system that enables fast angle-scanning using a digital micromirror device (DMD) and microlens array. Key novelties in our work include angle-scanning with kilohertz speeds, no requirement for time-averaging, and ability to multiplex various high-angle illumination angles.
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Author(s): Katherine C. Davidson, Vincent M. Rossi, Washburn Univ. (United States)
30 January 2023 • 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM PST | Moscone Center, Level 2 West
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Due to the increased resolution afforded by phase, Quantitative Phase Imaging (QPI) is a developing, advanced holographic imaging modality for understanding cellular dynamics. Changes in morphologies and dynamics of living cells are measurable non-invasively via QPI. Cells were imaged in vitro via Phase Shifted Digital Holography in order to observe changes in nuclear phase over prolonged periods of time while in an Arduino-based imaging incubator. QPI images were captured in order to monitor changes in nuclear phase during mitosis, while damaging DNA via UV irradiance and while undergoing transfection.
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Author(s): Fiona Xu, Dan Fu, Univ. of Washington (United States)
On demand | Presenting live 30 January 2023
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In this study, we report a quantitative phase microscopy-based imaging and analysis pipeline for drug response measurements for different types of cancer cell lines and drug-resistance cell lines treated with drugs of varying mechanisms of action. Our system accurately quantifies cell growth, cell count, and morphological features at the population and single-cell levels. The single-cell sensitivity of the method allows us to explore the heterogeneity of cell exposure and response.
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Author(s): Huai-Ching Hsieh, Kung-Bin Sung, National Taiwan Univ. (Taiwan)
On demand | Presenting live 30 January 2023
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Based on conventional spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM), two additional display patterns of a twisted-nematic liquid-crystal spatial light modulator are added to estimate the phase of high-scattering intracellular structures such as dense cell granules. Preliminary quantitative phase images of the rat insulinoma cell line, INS-1832/13, with glucose treatments show more distinguishable insulin secretory vesicles compared to the original SLIM images. Selective imaging of cellular granules could be achieved by optimizing the width of the phase ring displayed on the spatial light modulator, and the proposed method might be applied to label-free quantitative analysis of secretory cells.
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Author(s): Benoit Wattellier, Asif Rakib, Charan Godavarthi, PHASICS S.A. (France); Julien Savatier, Serge Monneret, Institut Fresnel (France)
30 January 2023 • 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM PST | Moscone Center, Level 2 West
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Interaction between intracellular compartments is based on complex vesicular transport processes. Fluorescence based techniques now reach single molecule resolution in living cells. We show that, in certain conditions, tracking vesicles with quantitative phase imaging has advantages over fluorescence. We derive figures of merit which help the scientist to find when QPI improves biological outcomes for tracking experiments.
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Author(s): Azeem Ahmad, Vishesh Kumar Dubey, Nikhil Jayakumar, Mona Nystad, Balpreet Singh Ahluwalia, UiT The Arctic Univ. of Norway (Norway)
30 January 2023 • 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM PST | Moscone Center, Level 2 West
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Dynamic speckle illumination (DSI) enables high spatio-temporal bandwidth product with high spatial phase sensitivity in the interference microscopy (IM) systems unlike conventional light sources like lasers, light emitting diodes, and white light. The present work provides a basic understanding of DSI and demonstrates the required conditions for the interference fringe formation in IM systems through both simulations and experiments. Contrary to low coherent light sources, DSI also facilitates scalable field of view and resolution possibility in IM. We demonstrated the effectiveness and applicability of the DSI-based IM system in the domain of various biomedical imaging applications such as in vitro fertilization, antimicrobial resistance diagnostics, histopathology, marine biology, and nanoscale imaging of biological specimens.
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Author(s): Bagath Chandraprasad T., Indian Institute of Technology Madras (India); Pramitha Vayalamkuzhi, Central Scientific Instruments Organisation (CSIO) (India); Shanti Bhattacharya, Indian Institute of Technology Madras (India)
On demand | Presenting live 30 January 2023
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The Hilbert transform (HT) method is an optical phase retrieval method from a single off-axis interference pattern, and is suitable for dynamic quantitative phase imaging applications. However, one of the significant issues with the HT method is the error generated due to noise in the recorded interference pattern, which can be avoided using a proper pre-filtering step. This study focuses on different aspects of pre-filtering of HT method and its effect on the retrieved phase. The observations are verified experimentally by performing quantitative phase imaging of human blood cells using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer configuration.
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Author(s): Nansen Zhou, Renjie Zhou, Hongfei Zhu, The Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong, China)
On demand | Presenting live 30 January 2023
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In quantitative phase imaging, spatial resolution and its influencing factors have not been fully explored. Here, we propose to define phase resolution based on the Sparrow limit. The phase inequivalence between adjacent object points will be considered. To study the phase resolution, the analytical solution to the complex scattered field from a phase object is first obtained by solving the inhomogeneous wave equation in the wavevector space. We have found that the phase resolution is not only related to the illumination wavelength and the numerical aperture of the imaging system, but also the object size and the phase detection signal-to-noise ratio. We have validated our findings by simulating phase imaging of various resolution features, including point arrays and periodic arrays.
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Author(s): Mariia Aleksandrovych, The Graduate Ctr., The City Univ. of New York (United States), Hunter College, The City Univ. of New York (United States); Mark Strassberg, Chelsea Yu, Min Xu, Hunter College, The City Univ. of New York (United States)
30 January 2023 • 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM PST | Moscone Center, Level 2 West
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We presented an application of a deep Plug-and-Play denoiser for high-quality phase recovery in polarization differential interference contrast (PDIC) microscopy. The PDIC microscope records the unfiltered Stokes vector for the differential interference fringe pattern using a polarization camera in a single snapshot without filtering. The denoiser, as one additional penalty term in a total variance (TV) regularized physics model for quantitative phase reconstruction, significantly improves the quality of the recovered phase images. We demonstrate the performance of this approach for hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained and unstained biological tissue sections.
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Author(s): Kyung Chul Lee, Duke Univ. (United States), Yonsei Univ. (Korea, Republic of); Hyesuk Chae, Yonsei Univ. (Korea, Republic of); Lucas Kreiss, Shiqi Xu, Amey Chaware, Kanghyun Kim, Duke Univ. (United States); Hyeongyu Kim, Kyoungwon Kim, Dosik Hwang, Seung Ah Lee, Yonsei Univ. (Korea, Republic of); Roarke Horstmeyer, Duke Univ. (United States)
30 January 2023 • 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM PST | Moscone Center, Level 2 West
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We propose a high-throughput phase-guided digital histological staining based on Fourier ptychographic microscopy using a deep neural network. Since the phase information includes the refractive index distribution of the specimen, we can digitally stain the unstained tissue slides from the quantitative phase images, which present the same color features that can be observed under a conventional microscope with the staining process. Here, we utilize Fourier Ptychographic Microscope which enables wide field and high-resolution QPI which utilizes the multiple measurements varying illumination angle. By jointly optimizing the illumination pattern, phase reconstruction, and digital staining network in an end to end ways, we realize the efficient and effective digital staining process using FPM. We will report on the digital stained result from phase images, the performance comparison with joint optimization, and discuss the future direction of our approach.
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Author(s): Yerim Kim, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of); Unbeom Shin, Ctr. for Genomic Integrity, Institute of Basic Sciences, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of); Inwoo Park, Nurbolat Aimakov, Sangjin Lee, Myeonghoon Choi, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of); Yoonsung Lee, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee Univ. (Korea, Republic of); Woonggyu Jung, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)
30 January 2023 • 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM PST | Moscone Center, Level 2 West
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Zebrafish are an emerging specimen due to their genetic similarity to humans, fast development, and transparency. To date, 3D imaging with fluorescence and clearing is actively utilized, but it has some limitations in terms of invasive, and time-consuming protocol. Here, we provide a novel label-free optical phase projection tomography using near-infrared and quantitative phase imaging (QPI). Our results demonstrated that QPI has enough contrast to identify phenotypes, and volumetric information of wild-type and atad5 mutant in several development stages presented the possibility of applying our imaging system to the screening of volumetric morphological alterations by genetic modification or drug treatment.
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Author(s): Dalip Singh Mehta, Shilpa Tayal, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (India); Azeem Ahmad, UiT The Arctic Univ. of Norway (Norway); Sunil Bhatt, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (India); Vishesh Kumar Dubey, Ankit Butola, Balpreet Singh Ahluwalia, UiT The Arctic Univ. of Norway (Norway)
30 January 2023 • 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM PST | Moscone Center, Level 2 West
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We have demonstrated quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) which is free from speckle noise and spurious fringes using partially spatially coherent monochromatic (PSCM) light. Using QPM with PSCM light we demonstrated an order of magnitude improved spatial phase sensitivity, space-bandwidth product, and high accuracy in measurement of phase, compared to QPM with coherent light. Experimental results of the 1951 UASF resolution chart and MG63 Osteosarcoma cells are presented. We observe the fine features and accurate morphology of the biological specimen that can be obtained with high spatial phase sensitivity. Hence, the proposed system can be used in the industrial as well as in the diagnostic field for high-resolution QPM.
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Author(s): Baptiste Marthy, Guillaume Baffou, Institut Fresnel (France)
30 January 2023 • 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM PST | Moscone Center, Level 2 West
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Cross-grating phase microscopy (CGM) is a wavefront imaging technique that can map the intensity and phase of a light beam with high sensitivity and spatial resolution. CGM is based on the association of a 2D-grating with a camera, separated by a millimetric distance. In this contribution, we will describe the working principle of CGM, briefly review the applications we developed in biology and nanophotonics, and focus on the accuracy of the technique: what precision and trueness can be expected in CGM as a function of the particular device settings. A comparison will be made with other quantitative phase microscopies.
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Author(s): Maëlle Bénéfice, Institut Fresnel (France); Céline Molinaro, Insitut Fresnel (France); Aurore Gorlas, Violette Da Cunha, Patrick Forterre, Institut de Biologie Integrative de la Cellule (France); Guillaume Baffou, Insitut Fresnel (France)
30 January 2023 • 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM PST | Moscone Center, Level 2 West
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Thermophilic microorganisms can thrive at temperatures higher than 100°C. Understanding how life can sustain such harsh conditions is of utmost interest. However, it remains hard to observe thermophilic micro-organisms living under a microscope. We show how laser heating of gold nanoparticle can successfully activate thermophilic bacteria. Thermophilic bacteria are cultured on gold nanoparticles, which are heated with a laser to create a temperature field. The temperature distribution and the thermophiles are imaged quantitatively using cross-grating phase microscopy. This work paves the way for the easy study of thermophiles and a better understanding of their metabolism and interaction.
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Author(s): Maria Josef Lopera Acosta, Carlos Trujillo, Univ. EAFIT (Colombia)
On demand | Presenting live 30 January 2023
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In this contribution, we present a study of the spatial resolution and QPI performance of digital lensless holographic microscopy (DLHM) when holographic optical elements (HOEs) are employed as the illumination source. The HOE employed in this study is a transmission hologram of a 3um pinhole-based illumination system. We have quantified the imaging performance of the studied DLHM implementation by using a tailor-made phase USAF test target. After the results, we have validated the dependance of the resolution from the geometrical setup and the phase sensitivity of the same.
12389-67
Author(s): Jeongwon Shin, Jinho Park, KAIST (Korea, Republic of); Geon Kim, Moosung Lee, KAIST (Korea, Republic of), Smart Healthcare Device Research Ctr. (Korea, Republic of); Yongkeun Park, KAIST (Korea, Republic of), Tomocube, Inc. (Korea, Republic of), Smart Healthcare Device Research Ctr. (Korea, Republic of)
30 January 2023 • 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM PST | Moscone Center, Level 2 West
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Long-term monitoring of bacteria is vital for healthcare and biological sciences, but time-consuming microbial culture for sufficient signals highlighted the importance of the investigation of individual bacteria. Recently optical diffraction tomography (ODT) enabled label-free quantitative tomographic image measurement at the single-cell level. However, individual cell measurement of ODT images is accompanied by experimental difficulties. One is the Brownian motion and motility of bacteria in a liquid medium, which hinders cell tracking and generates motion artifacts. Several existing immobilization methods produce noisy images and or even physiologically alter the sample. Here, we propose an experimental method that utilizes a hydrogel to enable long-term high-quality ODT images. We demonstrated enhanced image quality and immobilization compared to other environments. Our method also enables the analysis of long-term cellular quantitative features and response to antibiotics.
12389-68
Author(s): Zoya Alam, Abhishek Banerjee, Birla Institute of Technology Mesra (India); Robert J. Zawadzki, Univ. of California, Davis (United States); Raju Poddar, Birla Institute of Technology Mesra (India)
On demand | Presenting live 30 January 2023
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We present a non-invasive study of the zebrafish brain to understand the vasculature and changing cellular dynamics in the cerebral stroke model using swept-source optical coherence tomography/angiography (SSOCT/A). An ischemic stroke is caused by reduced or obstructed blood supply in the brain, eventually leading to cell death due to insufficient oxygen and nutrient levels. The aberrant/anomalous blood flow characteristics in ischemic stroke are analyzed by phase variance and doppler method using SSOCT. The subsequent cellular activity is monitored using the speckle-contrast technique of SSOCT. The SSOCT technique for disease surveillance provides fast acquisition time, reduced motion artefacts, label-free visualization and non-invasive examination.
12389-69
Author(s): Malith Ranathunga, Chulmin Joo, Seongri Song, Taegyun Moon, Yonsei Univ. (Korea, Republic of)
30 January 2023 • 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM PST | Moscone Center, Level 2 West
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Fourier ptychography (FP) is a computational imaging technique that enables large-area, high-resolution imaging of a thin specimen. The main limitation of FP is that it requires a large number of image acquisitions, making it unsuitable for imaging dynamic samples. Here we propose a video-rate FP method with novel illumination multiplexing scheme that significantly reduces the acquisition time. We use asymmetric illumination to estimate the complex information of the object and dark-field spectral- and state-multiplexed illumination to achieve large-area, high-resolution quantitative phase imaging. Our prototype can provide a resolution of 4 times that is achievable with the objective NA with only three measurements.
12389-70
Author(s): Mahn Jae Lee, Herve Hugonnet, YongKeun Park, KAIST (Korea, Republic of)
30 January 2023 • 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM PST | Moscone Center, Level 2 West
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Deconvolution phase microscopy enables quantitative imaging of transparent samples by measuring their refractive index. Due to the use of incoherent light and non-interferometric measurements, the optical setup is both robust to noise and cost effective. However, the imaging of thick samples has until now required scanning of the focus plane through the sample. Here we developed a new illumination scheme maximizing axial sectioning and allowing to directly obtain the refractive index information of the sample at the current focus plane without scanning.
12389-71
Author(s): Woonsoo Lee, Hansol Yoon, Sangchan Na, Sumin Lee, Taehong Kim, Tomocube, Inc. (Korea, Republic of); Herve J. Hugonnet, KAIST (Korea, Republic of); Yongkeun Park, Tomocube, Inc. (Korea, Republic of), KAIST (Korea, Republic of)
30 January 2023 • 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM PST | Moscone Center, Level 2 West
Conference Chair
Univ. of Pittsburgh (United States)
Conference Chair
KAIST (Korea, Republic of)
Conference Co-Chair
Univ. of Chicago (United States)
Program Committee
Univ. Complutense de Madrid (Spain)
Program Committee
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
Program Committee
The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
Program Committee
Istituto di Scienze Applicate e Sistemi Intelligenti "Eduardo Caianiello" (Italy)
Program Committee
Westfälische Wilhelms-Univ. Münster (Germany)
Program Committee
Univ. of South Florida (United States)
Program Committee
Boston Univ. (United States)
Program Committee
Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States)
Program Committee
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (Switzerland)
Program Committee
Medizinische Univ. Innsbruck (Austria)
Program Committee
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
Program Committee
Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)
Program Committee
The Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong, China)
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