Thank you for attending Photonics West 2022
SPECIAL ABSTRACT REQUIREMENTS: PEER REVIEW
Submissions to this conference are due no later than 25 August 2021 (later than the main BIOS due date) and must include the following:
  • 100-word text abstract (for online program)
  • 250-word text abstract (for abstract digest)
  • 3-page PDF summary (for committee review). Expanded content is not necessary and will not be considered; please limit your summary to 3 pages.


Optical coherence tomography and other optical methods and instruments based on coherent light interactions with tissues and detection methods are promising for noninvasive medical diagnostics and monitoring a wide spectrum of pathologies as well as fundamental biomedical research. The focus of this conference will be on the physical and mathematical basis of coherence domain methods, new instrumentation and techniques and their applications in biomedical science and clinical practice. Directions of research and development in areas such as optical coherence tomography (OCT), low-coherence interferometry, speckle and speckle interferometry measurement and imaging technologies, polarized light diagnostic methods, coherent light microscopy, and coherence technologies for flow and functional imaging will be considered. Applications of coherence domain optical methods for biological studies and clinical applications will also be discussed.

Papers are solicited on the following and related topics: ;
In progress – view active session
Conference 11948

Optical Coherence Tomography and Coherence Domain Optical Methods in Biomedicine XXVI

24 - 26 January 2022 | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
View Session ∨
  • 1: Blood Flow
  • 2: Neural and Endoscopic/Catheter
  • 3: Ophthalmic New Technology
  • 4: Novel Light Sources and System Technologies
  • 5: New Clinical Applications
  • 6: In Vitro/Small Animal
  • 7: OCT New Technology
  • 8: Novel Contrast
  • 9: PSOCT
  • 10: Signal/Image Processing
  • Posters-Monday
Information

Presentation times are finalized; please adhere to the schedule

Session 1: Blood Flow
24 January 2022 • 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
Session Chair: Ryan P. McNabb, Duke Univ. School of Medicine (United States)
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Author(s): Dawid Borycki, Institute of Physical Chemistry (Poland), International Ctr. for Translational Eye Research (Poland); Egidijus Auksorius, International Ctr. for Translational Eye Research (Poland), Ctr. for Physical Sciences and Technology (Lithuania); Piotr Franciszek Wegrzyn, International Ctr. for Translational Eye Research (Poland); Kamil Lizewski, Slawomir Tomczewski, International Ctr. for Translational Eye Research (Poland), Institute of Physical Chemistry (Poland); Ieva Žickiene, Karolis Adomavicius, Ctr. for Physical Sciences and Technology (Lithuania); Maciej Wojtkowski, International Ctr. for Translational Eye Research (Poland), Institute of Physical Chemistry (Poland)
24 January 2022 • 9:00 AM - 9:15 AM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
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We recently demonstrated high-speed, high-resolution structural imaging of the human eye in vivo by spatiotemporal optical coherence tomography (STOC-T). STOC-T extends the Fourier-Domain Full-Field Optical Coherence Tomography (FD-FF-OCT) by the spatial phase modulation to improve the imaging depth and suppress coherent noises. Here, we show that the dataset produced by STOC-T can be processed differently to reveal blood flow in the superficial and deep retina layers. Our method, denoted as multiwavelength LDH (MLDH) enables noninvasive visualization and quantification of the blood flow deep into the human retina at high speeds and high transverse resolution in vivo.
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Author(s): Sabina Stefan, Konrad Walek, Jang-Hoon Lee, Pooja Puttigampala, Anna Kim, Seong-Wook Park, Jonghwan Lee, Brown Univ. (United States)
24 January 2022 • 9:15 AM - 9:30 AM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
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We present methods based on Optical Coherence Tomography to quantify longitudinal changes in murine cortical vasculature. To demonstrate our methods, we tracked age-related changes in vascular structure and function of 3xTg Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and age-matched wild-type (WT) mice over the course of 7 months. In total, we measured 27 longitudinal parameters related to the morphology, topology, and function of the cortical vasculature across all scales: large pial vessels, penetrating vessels, and capillaries. Ten of these parameters showed different time-courses between AD and WT mice, with significant alterations preceding the onset of cognitive decline.
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Author(s): Xiang Wei, Tristan T. Hormel, Shaohua Pi, Bingjie Wang, Yali Jia, Oregon Health & Science Univ. (United States)
24 January 2022 • 9:30 AM - 9:45 AM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
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In this study, we present the development of sensorless adaptive optics swept-source optical coherence tomographic angiography (sAO-SS-OCTA) imaging system for mice. GPU-based real-time OCTA image acquisition and processing software was applied to guide wavefront correction using a deformable mirror. High-resolution OCTA images with high capillary resolution and contrast have been successfully acquired. 45-degree field of view high-resolution montaged OCTA image was also acquired.
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Author(s): Arash Dadkhah, Dhruba Paudel, Shuliang Jiao, Florida International Univ. (United States)
24 January 2022 • 9:45 AM - 10:00 AM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
Break
Coffee Break 10:00 AM - 10:30 AM
Session 2: Neural and Endoscopic/Catheter
24 January 2022 • 10:30 AM - 11:45 AM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
Session Chair: Dawid Borycki, Institute of Physical Chemistry PAS (Poland)
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Author(s): Rishyashring R. Iyer, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology (United States), Univ. of Illinois (United States); Yuan-Zhi Liu, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology (United States); Honggu Choi, Carlos A. Renteria, Brian E. Tibble, Stephen A. Boppart, Univ. of Illinois (United States)
24 January 2022 • 10:30 AM - 10:45 AM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
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We present Superfast Polarization-sensitive Off-axis Full-field Optical Coherence Microscopy (SPoOF OCM) as a novel all-optical technique for neurophysiology. Both the optical path length and birefringence induced by the millisecond-scale electrical activity of neurons are captured by SPoOF OCM at 4000 frames per second and with a field-of-view of 200×200 µm sq., 1 µm transverse resolution, 4.5 µm axial resolution, and 300 pm phase sensitivity. With an ability to capture responses spanning three orders of magnitude in both space and time, SPoOF OCM meets the exacting needs of a comprehensive neurophysiology tool and overcomes the existing limitations of traditional electrophysiology and fluorescence microscopy.
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Author(s): Shuying Li, Hongbo Luo, Yifeng Zeng, Washington Univ. in St. Louis (United States); Hassam Cheema, Ebunoluwa Otegbeye, William C. Chapman, Matthew Mutch, Chao Zhou, Washington Univ. School of Medicine in St. Louis (United States); Quing Zhu, Washington Univ. in St. Louis (United States)
24 January 2022 • 10:45 AM - 11:00 AM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
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In this study, we propose to combine miniaturized optical coherence tomography (OCT) catheter with a residual neural network (ResNet)-based deep learning model for differentiation of normal from cancerous colorectal tissue in fresh ex vivo specimens. The OCT catheter has an outer diameter of 3.8 mm, a lateral resolution of ~10 um, and an axial resolution of 6 um. A customized ResNet-based neural network structure was trained on both benchtop and catheter images. An AUC of 0.97 was achieved to distinguish between normal and cancerous colorectal tissue when testing on the rest of catheter images.
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Author(s): Slawomir Tomczewski, Institute of Physical Chemistry (Poland), International Ctr. for Translational Eye Research (Poland); Piotr Franciszek Wegrzyn, International Ctr. for Translational Eye Research (Poland), Institute of Physical Chemistry (Poland), Univ. of Warsaw (Poland); Andrea Curatolo, Dawid Borycki, International Ctr. for Translational Eye Research (Poland), Institute of Physical Chemistry (Poland); Egidijus Auksorius, International Ctr. for Translational Eye Research (Poland), Institute of Physical Chemistry (Poland), Ctr. for Physical Sciences and Technology (Lithuania); Maciej Wojtkowski, International Ctr. for Translational Eye Research (Poland), Institute of Physical Chemistry (Poland)
24 January 2022 • 11:00 AM - 11:15 AM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
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We report results from in-vivo measurements of a human retina photoreceptors layer response to a flicker stimulus. We performed our experiments with the Spatio-Temporal Optical Coherence-Tomography (STOC-T) setup. We show that the phase analysis facilitates spatially resolved detection of the retina's response to different stimulus frequencies.
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Author(s): Hongbo Luo, Shuying Li, Sitai Kou, Quing Zhu, Washington Univ. in St. Louis (United States)
24 January 2022 • 11:15 AM - 11:30 AM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
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We present initial results of OCT images of human fallopian tubes obtained from miniature OCT catheters. Two OCT catheters were fabricated to image from the outside and inside of the fallopian tube. The OCT catheter used to image from outside has an outer diameter of 3.8 mm, a lateral resolution of ~10 um, and an axial resolution of 6 um. Special attention was paid to the fimbriated end. The smaller OCT catheter used to image inner mucosa layer has an outer diameter of 1.5 mm. 3D structures of the normal and malignant human fallopian tubes were revealed.
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Author(s): Rachel Tan, Kaicheng Liang, Whitney Loh, A*STAR Agency for Science, Technology and Research (Singapore)
24 January 2022 • 11:30 AM - 11:45 AM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
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Endoscopic forward viewing optical coherence tomography is analogous to conventional endoscopic views and can be achieved by resonant scanning of an optical fiber. Multi-beam endoscopic resonant scanning is demonstrated by a set of optical fibers mounted to a piezoelectric bender actuator and depth-multiplexed using a long coherence length swept laser at 200 kHz sweep rate and 8 mm imaging range. A compact translation mechanism adjusting the distance between the imaging fibers and lenses enabled the precise tuning of optical magnification. Scalable fields of view between 1.3 mm and 2.8 mm were demonstrated.
Break
Lunch Break 11:45 AM - 2:00 PM
Session 3: Ophthalmic New Technology
24 January 2022 • 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
Session Chair: Robert J. Zawadzki, Univ. of California, Davis (United States)
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Author(s): Piotr Franciszek Wegrzyn, International Ctr. for Translational Eye Research (Poland), Univ. of Warsaw (Poland), Institute of Physical Chemistry (Poland); Egidijus Auksorius, International Ctr. for Translational Eye Research (Poland), Ctr. for Physical Sciences and Technology (Lithuania), Institute of Physical Chemistry (Poland); Dawid Borycki, International Ctr. for Translational Eye Research (Poland), Institute of Physical Chemistry (Poland); Bartosz Sikorski, Oculomedica Eye Research and Development Ctr. (Poland), Nicolaus Copernicus Univ. (Poland); Ieva Žickiene, Ctr. for Physical Sciences and Technology (Lithuania); Kamil Lizewski, International Ctr. for Translational Eye Research (Poland), Institute of Physical Chemistry (Poland); Karolis Adomavicius, Ctr. for Physical Sciences and Technology (Lithuania); Slawomir Tomczewski, International Ctr. for Translational Eye Research (Poland), Institute of Physical Chemistry (Poland); Maciej Wojtkowski, International Ctr. for Translational Eye Research (Poland), Institute of Physical Chemistry (Poland), Nicolaus Copernicus Univ. (Poland)
24 January 2022 • 2:00 PM - 2:15 PM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
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In this contribution, we report on in vivo retinal and choroid tissue imaging with Spatio-Temporal Optical Coherence Tomography (STOC-T) with a large field of view (9 x 4.6 mm2). We present en-face images of the retina's microstructure and choroid of the human eye with resolution enabling observation of single photoreceptors and choriocapillaris.
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Author(s): William Newberry, Laura Vargas, Marinko V. Sarunic, Simon Fraser Univ. (Canada)
24 January 2022 • 2:15 PM - 2:30 PM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
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We present our progress on multi-modal imaging in the mouse retina using OCT and Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence (TPEF). In order to progress this modality towards a clinical setting, the power incident on the retina must be reduced. With a significantly dimmer TPEF signal, motion corrected registration and averaging becomes difficult. We have developed an approach to utilize multi-modal simultaneous acquisition to non-rigidly register both datasets solely using the OCT signal. Image quality is further enhanced by correcting wavefront aberrations introduced from the high NA configuration through a sensorless image-based hill-climbing algorithm.
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Author(s): Shanjida Khan, Shuibin Ni, Thanh-Tin P. Nguyen, Oregon Health & Science Univ. (United States); Ringo Ng, Simon Fraser Univ. (Canada); Brandon J. Lujan, Ou Tan, David Huang, Yifan Jian, Oregon Health & Science Univ. (United States)
24 January 2022 • 2:30 PM - 2:45 PM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
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Thinning of the outer nuclear layer (ONL) can represent photoreceptor loss. Standard OCT systems cannot accurately measure the ONL and Henle’s fiber layer (HFL) thickness due to the insufficient demarcation between the two layers. In this work, we built a novel volumetric D-OCT prototype that incorporates two optical scanners in the OCT sample arm to synchronously scan the imaging beam on both the pupil and retina. This allows us to precisely control the OCT beam entry position and maintain an optimum beam incident angle on the retina that generates sufficient optical contrast for the HFL over the entire macular volume.
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Author(s): Eric M. Tang, Mohamed T. El-Haddad, Vanderbilt Univ. (United States); Shriji N. Patel, Vanderbilt Univ. Medical Ctr. (United States); Yuankai K. Tao, Vanderbilt Univ. (United States)
24 January 2022 • 2:45 PM - 3:00 PM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
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Intraoperative OCT (iOCT) provides real-time imaging data that can be used to aid clinical decision-making and verify completion of surgical goals. However, video-rate 4D iOCT imaging of surgical dynamics is limited by the need to manually align the OCT field-of-view (FOV) to the region-of-interest, thus significantly impacting surgical workflow. Here, we demonstrate automated instrument-tracking at over 120 Hz. We present video-rate 4D imaging and tracking of 25G internal limiting membrane forceps at 16 volumes/second. The proposed method and improvements will facilitate the broad adoption of iOCT technology by providing real-time volumetric feedback on surgical dynamics and instrument-tissue interactions.
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Author(s): David Veysset, Yueming Zhuo, Tong Ling, Stanford Univ. (United States); Vimal P. Pandiyan, Ramkumar Sabesan, University of Washington (United States); Daniel Palanker, Stanford Univ. (United States)
24 January 2022 • 3:00 PM - 3:15 PM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
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We present a method for determining the optical and thermal properties of layered materials, applicable to retinal laser therapy, using phase-resolved OCT. Transient heating of a tissue phantom is achieved by focusing a laser pulse onto a buried absorbing layer. Optical path length changes between the top of the phantom and the scattering absorbing layer induced by material expansion are extracted from the sequential B-scans. The absorption coefficient, heat conductivity and thermal expansion coefficient of the polymer are determined by matching the experimental data to a thermomechanical model of the tissue, yielding a temperature precision <2%, well below damage threshold.
Break
Coffee Break 3:15 PM - 3:45 PM
Session 4: Novel Light Sources and System Technologies
24 January 2022 • 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
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Author(s): Tae Shik Kim, Boy Braaf, Yongjoo Kim, Danielle J. Harper, Benjamin J. Vakoc, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)
24 January 2022 • 3:45 PM - 4:00 PM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
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Intraoperative OCT can markedly enhance visualization in both posterior and anterior eye procedures. In these applications, imaging speed is paramount, as slower systems interfere with surgical workflow. We have previously introduced a circular-ranging (CR) OCT architecture optimized for high-speed intraoperative applications. Here, we demonstrate retinal imaging by CR-OCT for the first time. We achieved a 13.5 MHz A-line rate and performed high-quality wide-field and video-rate normal-field imaging in human subjects. The compressive properties of CR allow each of these imaging modes to operate with reduced data capture, easing acquisition and processing requirements that are critical to achieving continuous and low-latency imaging.
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Author(s): Xihan Ma, Worcester Polytechnic Institute (United States); Mousa Moradi, Haithem Mustafa, Martin Hunter, Yu Chen, Univ. of Massachusetts Amherst (United States); Haichong K. Zhang, Worcester Polytechnic Institute (United States)
24 January 2022 • 4:00 PM - 4:15 PM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
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Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a medical imaging modality that can be used to quantify microstructural parameters of human kidneys in the cross-sectional view for kidney transplant surgeries to identify the organ’s health status. Existing desktop OCT devices suffer from limited scan area; therefore, it is difficult to evaluate the entire kidney. We explore the feasibility of combining the OCT system with a 7 degree-of-freedom robotic manipulator to leverage the robot’s large workspace and high localization accuracy for wider scan area and precise tracking of the OCT probe. With the proposed robotic-OCT procedure, the tissue sample can be detected using an RGB-depth camera for OCT scan path generation and scanned with online probe height optimization. A feasibility study was carried out by scanning an ex-vivo porcine kidney with the robotic-OCT system. Results show that over 38% of the tissue can be scanned. The tissue surface anatomy can be correctly reflected in 3D OCT image stitching; The online probe height optimization is able to maintain a constant distance between the probe and the tissue surface.
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Author(s): Jong Yoon Joo, KAIST (Korea, Republic of); Benjamin J. Vakoc, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine (United States); Wang-Yuhl Oh, KAIST (Korea, Republic of)
24 January 2022 • 4:15 PM - 4:30 PM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
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We present stretched-pulse mode-locked (SPML) wavelength-swept laser using intra- and extra-cavity chirped fiber Bragg grating (CFBG) for the ultrahigh-speed optical coherence tomography (OCT). We investigated the performance of the SPML laser as a light source for the ultrahigh-speed OCT by utilizing a combination of intra and extra-cavity stretching. We present that the noise performance and the coherence length performance of the laser can be adjusted and optimized through a proper combination of the intra and the extra cavity stretching in the SPML laser.
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Author(s): Ruizhi Zuo, Yaning Wang, Kristina Irsch, Jin U. Kang, Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States)
24 January 2022 • 4:30 PM - 4:45 PM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
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Optical coherence tomography (OCT) enables high-resolution volumetric (3D) imaging of biological tissues in vivo. However, 3D-image acquisition is often prone to motion artifacts from involuntary tissue movement. Here, we propose an OCT system and a higher-order regression-based algorithm capable of correcting tissue motion in 3D and with micron-scale accuracy as well as millisecond-scale time consumption. The system first scans three reference B-mode images along the C-axis before acquiring a standard C-mode image. The algorithm recognizes the tissue surface, then uses the segmentation result and short-axis references to align the B-scans laterally and axially respectively, resulting in a motion-free volumetric image.
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Author(s): Ashish Gupta, Daniel Ruminski, Grzegorz Gondek, Ireneusz Grulkowski, Nicolaus Copernicus Univ. (Poland)
24 January 2022 • 4:45 PM - 5:00 PM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
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A high speed motion detection technique using SS-OCT system is demonstrated. Acquired OCT signal from high speed reflector result in producing artifacts like axial position shifts and broadening of the OCT signal in final processed images. A methodology using forward and backward wavelength sweeps of swept source laser to correct these artifacts is proposed. Analysis of phase changes of interferograms recorded with bi-directional laser sweeps at high sweep rates can be used to determine the true trajectory of the fast moving object. This technique also helps in monitoring velocity of the object exceeding the velocity range set by the acquisition speed of the OCT system.
Session 5: New Clinical Applications
25 January 2022 • 9:15 AM - 10:00 AM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
Session Chair: Alexa R. Heaton, Morgridge Institute for Research (United States), Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison (United States)
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Author(s): Jonas Ogien, DAMAE Medical (France); Léna Waszczuk, DAMAE Medical (France), Univ. Paris-Saclay (France); Mariano Suppa, Véronique Del Marmol, Hôpital Erasme (Belgium); Josep Malvehy, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona (Spain); Elisa Cinotti, Ctr. Hospitalier Univ. de Saint-Étienne (Italy); Pietro Rubegni, Univ. degli Studi di Siena (Italy); Jean-Luc Perrot, Ctr. Hospitalier Univ. de Saint-Étienne (France); Arnaud Dubois, Univ. Paris-Saclay (France), DAMAE Medical (France)
25 January 2022 • 9:15 AM - 9:30 AM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
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Line-field confocal optical coherence tomography (LC-OCT) is an imaging technique based on a combination of confocal microscopy and OCT, allowing three-dimensional cellular-resolution imaging of skin in vivo. We present the latest advances in LC-OCT to facilitate the use of the technique by dermatologists and to improve the diagnosis and analysis of skin lesions. A video camera was incorporated into a handheld probe to acquire dermoscopy images in parallel with LC-OCT images. A confocal Raman spectrometer was coupled to a LC-OCT device to record morphological images of skin in which points of interest can be subjected to molecular characterization.
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Author(s): Derek Liu, Wihan Kim, Keck School of Medicine of USC (United States); Sangmin Kim, Texas A&M Univ. (United States); Kumara Ratnayake, Keck School of Medicine of USC (United States); Scott Mattison, Texas A&M Univ. (United States); John S. Oghalai, Brian E. Applegate, Keck School of Medicine of USC (United States)
25 January 2022 • 9:30 AM - 9:45 AM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
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Although OCT has been exploited extensively in studies of cochlear mechanics, a key limitation has been the ability to measure only in one dimension. To study the complex micromechanics of the organ of Corti, a 3D-OCT vibrometry system that can directly measure the vector of motion has been developed. The system uses three sample arms, encoding each in a single interferogram based on depth. The system demonstrated the ability to accurately measure changes in polar angles with an RMS error of ≤0.3˚. Preliminary measurements in a live mouse cochlea demonstrated direction-dependent differences in vibratory response.
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Author(s): Kayvan Samimi, Emmanuel Contreras Guzman, May Wu, Morgridge Institute for Research (United States); Lindsey C. Carlson, Helen Feltovich, Intermountain Health Care Inc. (United States); Timothy J. Hall, Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison (United States); Kristin M. Myers, Columbia Univ. (United States); Melissa C. Skala, Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison (United States)
25 January 2022 • 9:45 AM - 10:00 AM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
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Fetal membranes have important mechanical and antimicrobial roles in maintaining pregnancy. However, compared to other pregnancy tissues (e.g., uterus, cervix, placenta), they are understudied. Their low thickness (<800 µm) places them outside the resolution limits of most ultrasound and magnetic resonance scanners. As such, optical imaging methods like OCT have the potential to fill this technical gap. Here, an application of OCT imaging and machine learning for studying (ex vivo) the mechanical properties of the multilayered fetal membranes and correlating them with gestation and birth condition (i.e., labored vs. unlabored), and anatomy (i.e., near vs. far from cervix) is presented.
Break
Coffee Break 10:00 AM - 10:30 AM
Session 6: In Vitro/Small Animal
25 January 2022 • 10:30 AM - 11:15 AM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
Session Chair: Albert Claude Boccara, Institut Langevin Ondes et Images (France)
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Author(s): Claude Boccara, Olivier Thouvenin, Institut Langevin Ondes et Images (France); Amir H. Gandjbakhche, National Institutes of Health (United States); Linh Giang Pham, Ecole Supérieure de Physique et de Chimie Industrielles de la Ville de Paris (France); Martine Boccara, Institut de Biologie de l'Ecole Normale Supérieure (France)
25 January 2022 • 10:30 AM - 10:45 AM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
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Whereas Full Field OCT (FFOCT) relies on backscattering of light, Full Field Optical Transmission Tomography (FFOTT) relies on forward scattering using the Gouy’s phase shift modulation that is achieved close to the focus of a microscope objective. This new type of endogenous cell imaging technique that offers structural and metabolic contrasts is particularly well suited for imaging cell culture on glass slide or Petri dishes avoiding fringes that mask cells in FFOCT as well as biological structures such as biofilms. The sectioning ability is close to confocal microscopy but no contrast agent is required.
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Author(s): Andrew L. Lopez, Elena Gracheva, Hongwu Liang, Chao Zhou, Washington Univ. in St. Louis (United States)
25 January 2022 • 10:45 AM - 11:00 AM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
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Optogenetics is a powerful tool that allows tissue specific control with light activation. Here, we use Drosophila melanogaster as a tool to optimize and improve optogenetic cardiac pacing. We have obtained several D. melanogaster strains to test the performance of different opsins,light sensitive proteins, to determine which provide high-fidelity control of the heart with minimal power to activate. Using a lab-built optical coherence tomography (OCT) system integrated with an optogenetic set-up, flies were efficiently tested for performance and fidelity. Using a custom convolutional neural network, 2D+Time pacing images were segmented to quantify functional parameters such heart beat rate, change in lumen area, and heart wall velocity.
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Author(s): Yixuan Ming, Zhiyao Xu, Washington Univ. in St. Louis (United States); Yonatan R. Lewis-Israeli, Brett D. Volmert, Aitor Aguirre, Michigan State Univ. (United States); Chao Zhou, Washington Univ. in St. Louis (United States)
25 January 2022 • 11:00 AM - 11:15 AM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
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Organoids play an increasingly important role in in vitro models for studying organ development and disease mechanisms, and drug discovery. Recently, two groups independently developed human heart organoids from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). In this study, we utilized a customized spectral-domain OCT (SD-OCT) to study heart organoids and demonstrated its capability to produce 3D images. Heart organoids formed cavities of various sizes, and complex interconnections were observed as early as on day 6. Heart organoids and the OCT system showed promising insights as an in vitro platform to investigate heart development and diseases mechanisms.
Break
Lunch/Exhibition Break 11:15 AM - 1:30 PM
Session 7: OCT New Technology
25 January 2022 • 1:30 PM - 2:00 PM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
Session Chair: Audrey K. Bowden, Vanderbilt Univ. (United States)
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Author(s): Jingjing Zhao, Yonatan Winetraub, Stanford Univ. School of Medicine (United States); Lin Du, Univ. of Pennsylvania (United States); Aidan Van Vleck, Adam de la Zerda, Stanford Univ. School of Medicine (United States)
25 January 2022 • 1:30 PM - 1:45 PM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
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Focal size and depth-of-focus (DOF) are dependent by the numerical aperture (N.A.) of the lens. Consequently, a high-resolution image inherently results in a short DOF. In order to extend the DOF of a high N.A. lens, a novel diffractive optical element is developed to generate needle-shaped beams. The DOF can be enhanced from 12μm (two Rayleigh lengths) to 120μm with a constant diameter of 1.5μm (the same as the focal size). When applied to a virtual biopsy of human skin, the needle-shaped beam can reveal the individual cells in the epidermal layer.
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Author(s): Joseph D. Malone, Iftak Hussain, Audrey K. Bowden, Vanderbilt Univ. (United States)
25 January 2022 • 1:45 PM - 2:00 PM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
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Access to clinical OCT systems is currently limited to well-resourced medical centers due to their mechanical footprint, complexity and cost. Smartphone computational power and optical system quality has increased exponentially in recent years, leading to its implementation in various imaging and sensing applications. Here, we demonstrate a line-field visible-light OCT system that utilizes the native camera of a commercial smartphone and a custom phone application to collect, process and visualize 2D OCT cross-sectional data in real-time. We believe smartOCT can lead to significant impact in low-resource areas by making OCT devices accessible to a broader population.
Session 8: Novel Contrast
25 January 2022 • 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
Session Chair: Vivek J. Srinivasan, Univ. of California, Davis (United States)
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Author(s): Jun Zhu, Aaron Michael Kho, Univ. of California, Davis (United States); Tingwei Zhang, Univ. of California (United States); Vivek Jay Srinivasan, Univ. of California, Davis (United States)
25 January 2022 • 2:00 PM - 2:15 PM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
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Conventional methods of spectroscopic Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) determine depth-resolved spectra. Here, we present a spectroscopic method of assessing hemoglobin in OCT which, rather than determine a depth-resolved spectrum, determines a depth-resolved autocorrelation function. This complex-valued autocorrelation function is then fit with a model that incorporates the spectral absorption characteristics of different chromophores present in tissue. The proposed method does not use windowed Fourier transforms of the OCT data, and is well-suited for assessing chromophores in dynamic scattering environments such as blood vessels. The new autocorrelation spectroscopy method is compared against the conventional windowed Fourier transform method in the retina.
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Author(s): Felix Hilge, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States), Univ. zu Lübeck (Germany); Hinnerk Schulz-Hildebrandt, Univ. zu Lübeck (Germany), Medizinisches Laserzentrum Lübeck GmbH (Germany), Airway Research Ctr. North (ARCN) (Germany); Michael Wang-Evers, Nunciada Salma, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States); Martin Ahrens, Univ. zu Lübeck (Germany), Airway Research Ctr. North (ARCN) (Germany); Michael Münter, Univ. zu Lübeck (Germany); Gereon Hüttmann, Univ. zu Lübeck (Germany), Medizinisches Laserzentrum Lübeck GmbH (Germany), Airway Research Ctr. North (ARCN) (Germany); Reginald Birngruber, Univ. zu Lübeck (Germany), Massachusetts General Hospital (United States), Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine (United States); Dieter Manstein, Massachusetts General Hospital (Germany)
25 January 2022 • 2:15 PM - 2:30 PM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
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Microscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides three-dimensional, high-resolution imaging but lacks (sub-) cellular contrast. Dynamic-microscopic OCT (dmOCT) is an approach exploiting dynamic changes of the scattering behavior in metabolically active cells. However, the underlying cellular processes responsible for those intensity fluctuations and hence the dynamic signals are not finally identified yet. Here, we present the effects of different temperatures and metabolic reagents on dmOCT images of an in-vitro human skin model. Our data indicates a dependency of the dmOCT signals on metabolic activity rather than Brownian motion and suggests dependency on the metabolic state.
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Author(s): Taylor M. Cannon, Brett E. Bouma, Nestor Uribe-Patarroyo, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine (United States)
25 January 2022 • 2:30 PM - 2:45 PM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
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Measuring light scattering properties using OCT stands to enhance its ability to capture clinically-relevant microstructural details, but challenges remain in accurately relating these properties to underlying tissue architecture. In this work, we demonstrate the collection of depth-multiplexed data at diverse scattering angles with a glass annulus to facilitate correction of imaging system-based signal biases and identify multiply scattering areas in tissue. Based on our promising preliminary results from phantoms and healthy excised tissue samples, we hope our approach will enhance the accuracy of quantitative scattering parameter measurements, and help to realize their potential in offering detailed microstructural characterization of biological tissues.
11948-56
Author(s): Johannes Kübler, Vrije Univ. Amsterdam (Netherlands), Heidelberg Engineering GmbH (Germany); Vincent S. Zoutenbier, Vrije Univ. Amsterdam (Netherlands); Arjen Amelink, TNO (Netherlands), Vrije Univ. Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jörg Fischer, Heidelberg Engineering GmbH (Germany); Johannes F. de Boer, Vrije Univ. Amsterdam (Netherlands)
25 January 2022 • 2:45 PM - 3:00 PM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
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The attenuation coefficient can be calculated from OCT data, but accurate determination requires compensating for the confocal function. We present detailed measurement series for extraction of the focal plane and the apparent Rayleigh length from the ratios of OCT images acquired with different focus depths and compare these results with alternative approaches. The optimal focus depth difference is determined for intralipid and titanium oxide phantoms with different scatterer concentrations and the attenuation coefficients corrected for the confocal function are calculated. We further demonstrate good reproducibility of the determined attenuation coefficient of layers with identical scatter concentrations in a multi-layered titanium oxide phantom.
Session 9: PSOCT
26 January 2022 • 9:30 AM - 10:00 AM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
Session Chair: Danielle J. Harper, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine (United States)
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Author(s): Pelham Keahey, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine (United States); Peng Si, Stanford Univ. (United States); Martin Villiger, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine (United States); Adam de la Zerda, Stanford Univ. (United States); Brett E. Bouma, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine (United States)
26 January 2022 • 9:30 AM - 9:45 AM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
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Polarization Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography (PS-OCT) measures the intensity and polarization state of backscattered light to provide information about tissue structure, retardation and depolarization. Developing molecular contrast agents for PS-OCT could also provide physiological, cellular, and molecular information. In this study, we utilize the depolarization and spectral signature of anisotropic gold nanobipyramids (GNBPs) and demonstrate how the optical properties of these nanostructures can be used as contrast agents for PS-OCT in living tissue.
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Author(s): Jonas Golde, Julia Walther, TU Dresden (Germany); Jiawen Li, Robert A. McLaughlin, The Univ. of Adelaide (Australia); Edmund Koch, TU Dresden (Germany)
26 January 2022 • 9:45 AM - 10:00 AM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
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Common-path probes provide considerable advantages for fiber-based OCT due to intrinsic length and phase matching. However, the polarization state of the reference light is usually arbitrary and variable due to stress-induced birefringence in single-mode fibers, which complicates implementing polarization-sensitive OCT. Here, we present depth-resolved retardation measurements with a single-mode fiber-based common-path probe by utilizing the constrained polarization evolution and the mirror state phenomenon for reconstruction of the round-trip measurements in the case of arbitrary reference states. Thus, a compact and flexible polarization-sensitive OCT implementation is demonstrated.
Session 10: Signal/Image Processing
26 January 2022 • 10:00 AM - 10:30 AM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
Session Chair: Pelham Keahey, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine (United States)
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Author(s): Jose J. Rico-Jimenez, Dewei Hu, Eric M. Tang, Ipek Oguz, Yuankai K. Tao, Vanderbilt Univ. (United States)
26 January 2022 • 10:00 AM - 10:15 AM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
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Ophthalmic OCT image-quality is highly variable and directly impacts clinical diagnosis of disease. Computational methods such as frame-averaging, filtering, deep-learning approaches are generally constrained by either extended imaging times when acquiring repeated-frames, over-smoothing and loss of features, or the need for extensive training sets. Self-fusion is a robust OCT image-enhancement method that overcomes these aforementioned limitations by averaging serial OCT frames weighted by their respective similarity. Here, we demonstrated video-rate self-fusion using a convolutional neural network. Our experimental results show a near doubling of OCT contrast-to-noise ratio at a frame-rate of ~22 fps when integrated with custom OCT acquisition software.
11948-68
Author(s): Christos Photiou, Univ. of Cyprus (Cyprus); Maria Fala, Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Costas Pitris, Univ. of Cyprus (Cyprus)
26 January 2022 • 10:15 AM - 10:30 AM PST | Room 201 (Level 2 South)
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Accurate and robust estimation of the scatterer size from OCT has the potential to provide a diagnostically useful biomarker of disease. However, the proposed approaches are very challenging to apply to scatterer sizes below 4 μm due to their inherent lack of accuracy. In this study, we propose the use of fractal analysis to robustly and accurately estimate the size of scatterers as small as 0.1 μm in diameter. The box counting method was used to define the statistical characteristics of the FD, first calculated for individual neighborhoods and, subsequently, for the entire image. Using a selected subset of these features, the scatterer size of microsphere phantoms was estimated with a mean error of 32.8 %. The proposed method will have to be tested further both on an expanded phantom set but also on human tissue. However, given the preliminary results presented in this study, this approach has the potential to be further developed and to perform in vivo scatterer size estimation.
Posters-Monday
24 January 2022 • 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM PST | Moscone West, Lobby (Level 3)
Conference attendees are invited to attend the Monday BiOS poster session. Come view the posters, enjoy light refreshments, ask questions, and network with colleagues in your field.

Poster Setup: Monday 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
View poster presentation guidelines and set-up instructions at:
https://spie.org/PW/Poster-Guidelines
11948-69
Author(s): Egidijus Auksorius, Ctr. for Physical Sciences and Technology (Lithuania); Dawid Borycki, Piotr Franciszek Wegrzyn, Institute of Physical Chemistry (Poland); Ieva Žickiene, Ctr. for Physical Sciences and Technology (Lithuania); Slawomir Tomczewski, Institute of Physical Chemistry (Poland); Karolis Adomavicius, Ctr. for Physical Sciences and Technology (Lithuania); Kamil Lizewski, Maciej Wojtkowski, Institute of Physical Chemistry (Poland)
24 January 2022 • 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM PST | Moscone West, Lobby (Level 3)
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High-resolution and fast in vivo deep-tissue imaging is still a major challenge in OCT. For instance, it might be difficult to image deeper retinal layers and choroid in the eye simply because coherent noise, such as speckle and crosstalk, limits the imaging depth and spatial resolution. To address that, we have developed a technique termed Spatio-Temporal Optical Coherence Tomography (STOC-T), which uses light with controlled spatial and temporal coherence. STOC-T has made it possible to quickly obtain high-contrasted coronal projection images of the choroid at various depths and over large field of view including choriocapillaris, which are usually hidden behind speckles and blurred by eye movement artifacts.
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Author(s): Guangying Ma, Taeyoon Son, Tae-Hoon Kim, Xincheng Yao, Univ. of Illinois at Chicago (United States)
On demand | Presented live 24 January 2022
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This study is to compare the optical coherence tomography (OCT) amplitude intrinsic optical signal (IOS) and phase IOS change of the human retina after light stimulation. A custom constructed OCT was employed for functional optoretinography imaging. A white LED was used as the retinal stimulator. OCT amplitude and phase IOS were computed by comparing the amplitude and phase before and after light stimulation. Both amplitude IOS and phase IOS were observed right after the stimulus onset, predominantly in the outer retina. The phase IOS is more sensitive to the layer boundaries.
11948-73
Author(s): Weikai Xue, Univ. Paris-Saclay (France); Jonas Ogien, DAMAE Medical (France); Pavel Bulkin, Ecole Polytechnique (France); Anne-Lise Coutrot, Univ. Paris-Saclay (France); Arnaud Dubois, Univ. Paris-Saclay (France), DAMAE Medical (France)
On demand | Presented live 24 January 2022
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We present a line-field confocal optical coherence tomography (LC-OCT) device, based on a Mirau interferometer, that can acquire three-dimensional (3D) images of the skin with an isotropic resolution of ~ 1.3 microns. A 3D image, with a lateral field of view of 940 µm × 600 µm over a depth of 350 µm, can be obtained from B-scans acquired at 17 frames per second. Compared to the previously reported LC-OCT devices based on a Linnik interferometer, the reported device has advantages in terms of compactness, weight and stability. High-resolution 3D imaging of skin tissue, in vivo, is demonstrated.
11948-77
Author(s): Shuwen Wei, Jin U. Kang, Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States)
On demand | Presented live 24 January 2022
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The phase of optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal carries critical information about particle micro-displacements. However, swept-source OCT (SSOCT) suffers from phase instability problems due to trigger jitters from the swept-source. In this work, a wrapped Gaussian mixture model (WGMM) is proposed to stabilize the phase of SSOCT systems. A closed-form iteration solution of the WGMM is derived using the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. Necessary approximations are made for real-time graphic processing unit (GPU) implementation. The performance of the proposed method is demonstrated through ex-vivo, in-vivo and flow phantom experiments. The results show its robustness in different application scenarios.
11948-79
Author(s): Hossein Asghari, Max Hushahn, Loyola Marymount Univ. (United States)
24 January 2022 • 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM PST | Moscone West, Lobby (Level 3)
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Time-stretch dispersive Fourier transform is a method for real-time Fourier transformation of optical signals that allows for the implementation of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) at tens of MHz A-scan rates. In this work we propose and demonstrate a Time-Stretch OCT (TS-OCT) method that supports multiple probes with minimal increase in system complexity and cost. The new method can be employed to expand the scannable area of TS-OCT system without sacrificing the x-y spatial resolution. The proposed method is based on using a Wavelength Division Multiplexer device in the signal arm of the TS-OCT system connected to multiple independent imaging probes.
11948-83
Author(s): Mousa Moradi, Xian Du, Yu Chen, Univ. of Massachusetts Amherst (United States)
On demand | Presented live 24 January 2022
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Deep learning-based models have been extensively used in computer vision and image analysis to automatically segment the region of interest (ROI) in an image. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is used to obtain the images of the kidney’s proximal convoluted tubules (PCTs), which can be used to quantify the morphometric parameters such as tubular density and diameter. However, the large image dataset and patient movement during the scan made the pattern recognition and deep learning task to be difficult. Another challenge is a large number of non-ROIs compared to ROI pixels which caused data imbalanced and low network performance. This paper aims at developing a soft Attention-based UNET model for automatic segmentation of tubule lumen kidney images. Attention-UNET can extract features based on the ground truth structure and hence the irrelevant feature maps are not contributed during training. The performance of the soft-Attention-UNET is compared with standard UNET, Residual UNET (Res-UNET), and fully convolutional neural network (FCN). The original dataset contains 14403 OCT images from 169 transplant kidneys for training and testing. The results have shown that soft-Attention-UNET can achieve the dice score of 0.78±0.08 and intersection over union (IOU) of 0.83 which was as accurate as the manual segmentation results (dice score = 0.835±0.05) and the best segmentation scores among Res-UNET, regular UNET, and FCN networks. The results show that CLAHE contrast enhancement can improve the segmentation metrics of all models significantly (p<0.05). Experimental results of this paper have proven that the soft Attention-based UNET is highly powerful for tubule lumen identification and localization and can improve clinical decision-making on a new transplant kidney as fast and accurately as possible.
11948-85
Author(s): Clayton B. Walker, The Univ. of Southern California (United States), Texas A&M Univ. (United States); Anna Wisniowiecki, Texas A&M Univ. (United States), The Univ. of Southern California (United States); Jack Tang, John S. Oghalai, Brian E. Applegate, The Univ. of Southern California (United States)
On demand | Presented live 24 January 2022
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We describe the optimization and application of a multi-window approach for improved resolution, side-lobe suppression, and phase sensitivity. Using the Hann window as a reference, we show that 10 windows are sufficient to achieve 43% resolution improvement, -32 dB side-lobe intensity, and a 20% improvement in phase sensitivity. We explored the benefits of this windowing technique for OCT imaging, OCT vibrometry, and Doppler OCT for angiography. Experimental data are in good agreement with the simulation. We believe it will be possible using this optimized approach to achieve real-time processing and display, despite the added computational load.
Conference Chair
Duke Univ. (United States)
Conference Chair
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
Program Committee
Technical Univ. of Denmark (Denmark)
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Univ. of Waterloo (Canada)
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Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States)
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Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic (United States)
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Vrije Univ. Amsterdam (Netherlands)
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Medizinische Univ. Wien (Austria)
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Institute of Applied Physics (Russian Federation)
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Medizinische Univ. Wien (Austria)
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Univ. zu Lübeck (Germany)
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Medizinische Univ. Wien (Austria)
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Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States)
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Stony Brook Univ. (United States)
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Univ. of Kent (United Kingdom)
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Case Western Reserve Univ. (United States)
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Simon Fraser Univ. (Canada)
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Guillermo J. Tearney
Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine (United States)
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Saratov State Univ. (Russian Federation), Tomsk State Univ. (Russian Federation), Institute of Precision Mechanics and Control of the RAS (Russian Federation)
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Univ. of Washington (United States)
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Nicolaus Copernicus Univ. (Poland)
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Univ. of Tsukuba (Japan)