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Submissions to this conference must include:
  • 100-word text abstract (for online program)
  • 250-word text abstract (for abstract digest)
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  • Genomics and proteomics have opened up an era providing new approaches and new tools for neuroscience research, particularly in optical neuroimaging. “Function follows form”, anatomic structure is the basis for understanding the brain’s function and brain diseases. Brain function depends on neuronal networks and so from a systems biology perspective, should be studied not only the neuron level, but also at the neuronal networks and system levels. Optical imaging can now be applied at multiple levels from gene to molecular, from cellular to tissue and from organ to system levels to yield critical information bridging molecular structure and physiological function.

    The purpose of this conference is to provide a forum for scientists, clinicians, engineers and manufacturers to report current developments and to discuss future opportunities for optical stimulating, modulating, manipulating, detecting, or imaging the brain or neural circuits at the gene, molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, or system level, in physiology and anatomy.

    Topics will include, but are not limited to, the following:

    Novel optical neuroimaging and sensing
    Brain models and biomarkers ;
    In progress – view active session
    Conference 11946

    Neural Imaging and Sensing 2022

    In person: 24 - 25 January 2022
    View Session ∨
    • 1: Microscopy I
    • 2: Brain Activities I
    • 3: Diffused Optical Imaging I
    • 4: OCT
    • 5: Diffused Optical Imaging II
    • 6: Novel Techniques
    • 7: Microscopy II
    • 8: Diffused Optical Imaging III
    • 9: Brain Activities II
    • Posters
    Information

    POST-DEADLINE ABSTRACT SUBMISSIONS

    • Submissions are accepted through 06-December
    • Notification of acceptance by 20-December

    View Call for Papers PDF Flyer
    Session 1: Microscopy I
    11946-1
    Author(s): Jing Yuan, Huazhong Univ. of Science and Technology (China)
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    Imaging quality is one of the fundamental strategies to solve the big data challenges of whole-brain optical imaging. Here, we develop a line illumination modulation (LiMo) microscopy, and, in combination with thin tissue sectioning, establish a high-definition fluorescence micro-optical sectioning tomography (HD-fMOST) method. HD-fMOST achieved the data acquisition of the whole mouse with a voxel resolution of 0.32 × 0.32 × 1 μm in 110 hours with an average SNR of 110. It significantly improved the efficiency of data compression, storage, transmission, and analysis. All results demonstrate that HD-fMOST potentially facilitates the large-scale acquisition and analysis of high-resolution whole-brain datasets.
    11946-2
    Author(s): XiaoQuan Yang, Can Zhou, Guangcai Liu, Xiangning Li, Hui Gong, Qingming Luo, Huazhong Univ. of Science and Technology (China)
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    Nonhuman primates (NHPs) are vital animal models for understanding of human brain functions. In this presentation, we will introduce a highly efficient pipeline to acquire the axon projections of the macaque brain, with a subcellular spatial resolution. The pipeline is composed of a poly-N-acryloyl glycinamide(PNAGA)-based embedding method, a high-resolution automatic whole-brain optical imaging system, and acquired image postprocessing program. Using viral labeling, we acquired and reconstructed the individual long-distance projection axons with a voxel size of 0.65 × 0.65× 3 μm3 from the frontal cortex across the entire brain hemisphere for the first time.
    11946-3
    Author(s): Timothy D. Weber, Maria V. Moya, Michael N. Economo, Jerome Mertz, Boston Univ. (United States)
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    Fluorescent genetically encoded voltage indicators can be combined with optical imaging to provide high-throughput electrophysiologic recordings with single-spike resolution and subthreshold sensitivity. Such voltage imaging is highly demanding in terms of signal collection; thus, most experiments have been performed with widefield one-photon microscopy. Unfortunately, widefield techniques are susceptible to out-of-focus background and scattering, which degrades SNR, especially in high-density slice or in vivo experiments. In this work, we describe a multi-plane near-kHz-rate confocal microscope that effectively suppresses undesired background. This technique enables more densely labeled in vitro and in vivo imaging experiments, critical for the dissection of neural circuit dynamics.
    11946-4
    Author(s): Rui Jin, Huazhong Univ. of Science and Technology (China); Yalan Yu, The Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong, China), Huazhong Univ. of Science and Technology (China); Dan Shen, Huazhong Univ. of Science and Technology (China); Qingming Luo, Huazhong Univ. of Science and Technology (China), Suzhou Institute for Brainsmatics (China), Hainan Univ. (China); Hui Gong, Jing Yuan, Huazhong Univ. of Science and Technology (China), Suzhou Institute for Brainsmatics (China)
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    Simultaneous axial dual-line scanning imaging is preferred in studying biological structures and activities in different views of interest. However, current methods are inflexible and have a small axial range. Here, we propose a flexible, video-rate, and spherical-aberration-compensated axial dual-line scanning imaging method. We improved a remote focusing system with a stepped mirror for the compensation of spherical aberration. We also proposed a FOV-jointing method to rearrange the two parallel lines into one head-to-head line for high-speed and flexible acquisition. All results demonstrate that our method potentially facilitates intravital biological study in different depths in a large axial range.
    11946-5
    Author(s): Sheng Xiao, Eric Lowet, Boston Univ. (United States); Howard Gritton, Univ. of Illinois (United States); Pierre Fabris, Jerome Mertz, Xue Han, Boston Univ. (United States)
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    Recent improvements in genetically encoded voltage indicators have enabled optical imaging of action potentials and subthreshold membrane voltage from single neurons in the mammalian brain. However, most current voltage imaging techniques can only simultaneously sample a few cell, limited either by strong background or small field-of-view. We show that, both theoretically and experimentally, targeted illumination with a widefield microscopy can significantly improve voltage imaging performance by improving signal contrast and reducing background cross-contamination. With such improvements, we demonstrated large-scale voltage imaging with fully genetically encoded voltage indicator SomArchon from tens of neurons over a large anatomical area, while maintaining signal contrast over a prolonged recording duration of several continuous minutes.
    Session 2: Brain Activities I
    11946-6
    Author(s): Wei Zhou, Shanshan Ke, Hui Gong, Wuhan National Research Ctr. for Optoelectronics (China)
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    Neuronal projection is the structural basis of neural information transmission. The development of single cell sparse labeling, whole brain imaging techniques and neuron tracing have promoted the reconstruction of single neuron morphology in the whole brain. Long-distance reconstructions of axons in individual neurons were reconstructed in most of brain areas. It revealed the diversity of neuronal axonal projection patterns in brain regions, suggesting that neuronal projection has complex functional specificity at the single-cell level. However, the relationship between the projection properties of individual neurons and the functions they carry in the behavioral brain remains unclear. We developed an approach combining in vivo two-photon imaging with in vitro whole-brain imaging of genetic calcium probe GCaMP for mapping axonal projections of individual neurons and relating those projections to the functional features of the same neurons.
    11946-7
    Author(s): Francesco Resta, Elena Montagni, LENS - Lab. Europeo di Spettroscopie Non-Lineari (Italy), Univ. degli Studi di Firenze (Italy); Giuseppe de Vito, LENS - Lab. Europeo di Spettroscopie Non-Lineari (Italy); Alessandro Scaglione, LENS - Lab. Europeo di Spettroscopie Non-Lineari (Italy), Univ. degli Studi di Firenze (Italy); Anna Letizia Allegra Mascaro, LENS - Lab. Europeo di Spettroscopie Non-Lineari (Italy), Istituto di Neuroscienze, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (Italy); Francesco Saverio Pavone, LENS - Lab. Europeo di Spettroscopie Non-Lineari (Italy), Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (Italy), Univ. degli Studi di Firenze (Italy)
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    The rostral forelimb area (RFA) and the caudal forelimb area (CFA), are major actors in orchestrating the coordination of forelimb complex movements in mice. Despite many studies characterizing these regions, their intrinsic connections and reciprocal functional role are still unclear. Here we implemented a novel method combining wide-field fluorescence imaging and optogenetic motor mapping to causally probe cortical neuronal activity patterns during stimulation of complex movements. Our results show movement-specific cortical activation features providing evidence for a segregated functional organization of CFA and RFA. Importantly, we identified a second discrete lateral grasping representation area, namely lateral forelimb area (LFA).
    11946-8
    Author(s): Anupam Bisht, Kathryn Simone, Univ. of Calgary (Canada), Hotchkiss Brain Institute (Canada); Govind Peringod, Grant R. Gordon, Jaideep S. Bains, Hotchkiss Brain Institute (Canada), Univ. of Calgary (Canada); Kartikeya Murari, Univ. of Calgary (Canada), Hotchkiss Brain Institute (Canada)
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    Oxygen saturation (sO2) is an important biomarker and is known to be coupled to cellular activity in the brain. A previously developed single fiber system (SFS) has been shown to measure sO2 from a localized region of deep brain tissue. Earlier experiments have shown robust slow changes in the sO2 parameter. However, certain relatively rapid temporal variations in the signal remain unexplained. This work is the first attempt to investigate the sources of these variations in the SFS recordings during in-vivo experiments in mice synchronized with behavioral recording cameras.
    Session 3: Diffused Optical Imaging I
    11946-9
    Author(s): Yuanyuan Gao, De'Ja Rogers, Alexander von Lühmann, Antonio Ortega, David A. Boas, Meryem Yucel, Boston Univ. (United States)
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    GLM and image reconstruction of fNIRS data are usually performed sequentially. Since the physiological process is temporally and spatially dependent, it is preferable to model them simultaneously. Here, we propose an image reconstruction algorithm that performs short separation GLM and image reconstruction simultaneously. We used spatial basis and temporal basis to represent the change of hemoglobin in both spatial and temporal space. We simulated a perturbation change in the motor region of a head model, and reconstructed it using our algorithm. The location of the perturbation is successfully reconstructed. We are collecting experimental data to further validate the algorithm.
    11946-10
    Author(s): Changhyun Park, Sung Woo Woo, Keum-Shik Hong, Chang-Seok Kim, Pusan National Univ. (Korea, Republic of)
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    In this study, a wearable fNIRS system was developed to apply with frequency division multiplexing. A patch made of an elastomeric substrate is newly adopted to improve the adhesion between the optodes and scalp in long-term measurements. It was also tested for the stability and accuracy of the manufactured fNIRS system. In addition, the hemodynamic response of the prefrontal area was successfully measured in the simple cognitive problem-solving process.
    11946-11
    Author(s): Antonio Ortega-Martinez, Boston Univ. (United States); Alexander von Lühmann, Boston Univ. (United States), NIRx Medical Technologies, LLC (Germany); David A. Boas, Meryem A. Yücel, Boston Univ. (United States)
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    fNIRS is a technique to quantify evoked changes in brain hemodynamics. Due to its portability, it has been proposed for brain computer interfaces (BCI). Presenting feedback to the user has shown to improve BCI performance, but in the case of fNIRS, it is necessary to first separate in real-time the neural response from the relatively large extra cerebral component of the signal. Here, we propose a closed-loop feedback BCI pipeline for fNIRS with real-time Kalman and time embedded canonical correlation analysis regression. We demonstrate the achieved real-time classification by testing our pipeline with a left vs right finger tapping task.
    11946-12
    Author(s): Alvin Agato, Hannah E. Devore, Michelle J. Hedlund, Anthony C. O'Sullivan, William T. Hamic, Calamity F. Svoboda, Abigail L. Magee, Broc A. Burke, Adam T. Eggebrecht, Edward J. Richter, Joseph P. Culver, Washington Univ. School of Medicine in St. Louis (United States)
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    Our wearable high-density diffuse optical tomography (WHD-DOT) instrument delivers high resolution imaging and portability. Optimizing the electronics and mechanical design enabled miniaturization and integration of LED and photodiode for sensing, WiFi for bidirectional data transmission, and power delivery into a wearable cap. In vivo measurements showed dynamic range, SNR, crosstalk, and imaging quality similar to current fiber-based HD-DOT specifications. Movie-evoked activation maps demonstrate feasibility of functional neuroimaging with a naturalistic paradigm. DOT-based motion denoising showed improved brain localization. WHD-DOT modules in current design enable scaling to whole-head field of view for further studies with complex naturalistic tasks in real-world settings.
    11946-13
    Author(s): Giles Blaney, Angelo Sassaroli, Cristianne Fernandez, Tufts Univ. (United States); Martina Bottoni, Tufts Univ. (United States), Politecnico di Torino (Italy); Sergio Fantini, Tufts Univ. (United States)
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    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy may be used to access and study cerebral hemodynamics during brain activation tasks. Imaging on these hemodynamics is often confounded by superficial hemodynamics and artifacts. In this work, a dual-slope imaging array is utilized to access different hemodynamic signals from different data-types. This, with the expectation that dual-slope and phase better suppress artifacts and superficial signal. Here, data from a hand-grasping protocol is presented showing an example dual-slope set (from an imaging array). Future work will include careful comparison of hemodynamics measured with different data-types and reconstruction of activation maps for said data-types.
    Session 4: OCT
    11946-14
    Author(s): Chao J. Liu, William Ammon, Robert J. Jones, Jackson Nolan, Ruopeng Wang, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States); Shuaibin Chang, David A. Boas, Boston Univ. (United States); Bruce Fischl, Hui Wang, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)
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    We investigated the effect of refractive-index matching by 2,2’-thiodiethanol (TDE) immersion in polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) measurements of ex vivo human brain tissue. We found an improved axis orientation mapping of cortical fiber tracts in distinct layers of gray matter that were not visible without index matching. TDE immersion also increased the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in retardance, enabling precise measurements of apparent birefringence, which was underestimated in the white matter but overestimated in the gray matter without TDE immersion. Refractive-index matching TDE immersion provides a promising approach to precisely measure the optical properties of human brain tissue using PS-OCT.
    11946-15
    Author(s): Ilyas Saytashev, Anthony Parra, Ctr. for Devices and Radiological Health (United States), U.S. Food and Drug Administration (United States); Yong-Chul Yoon, Benjamin J. Vakoc, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine (United States), Massachusetts General Hospital (United States); Srikanth Vasudevan, Daniel X. Hammer, Ctr. for Devices and Radiological Health (United States), U.S. Food and Drug Administration (United States)
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    We have developed a novel nerve holder, imaging protocol and post-processing routine which enhance OCT imaging by accessing peripheral nerve from 3 sides. Two mirror prisms provide imaging access from sides of a peripheral nerve in addition to conventional volume acquisition from the top. Prism glass compensates for changed focusing and optical pathlength during nerve imaging from its sides Acquired prism sub-volumes and top-bottom imaged nerve sub-volume are merged in two-stage semi-automated postprocessing routine. We demonstrate successful application of this approach on tissue-mimicking phantoms, as well as in vivo rat sciatic nerve imaging.
    11946-16
    Author(s): Honggu Choi, Rishyashring R. Iyer, Carlos A. Renteria, Brian Tibble, Mantas Žurauskas, Stephen A. Boppart, Univ. of Illinois (United States)
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    The anomalous diffusion characteristics of neuronal dynamics are analyzed by label-free, phase-sensitive optical coherence microscopy. The technique provides low-noise images, enabling cellular dynamic characteristics to be measurable. The phase variance is a conventional dynamic parameter that cannot elucidate the ballistic components of neuronal dynamics. Determining the dynamics by phase variance alone omits the ballistic information that can occur from the ion exchange across cellular membranes. The probability density function of phase displacements exerted by cellular dynamics was acquired and the shape of the power-law tail was analyzed. The development of the power-law tail provides a more sensitive dynamic feature.
    Session 5: Diffused Optical Imaging II
    11946-17
    Author(s): Xiaojun Cheng, Boston Univ. (United States); Edbert J. Sie, Facebook Inc. (United States); Stephanie Naufel, Facebook Technologies, LLC (United States); David A. Boas, Boston Univ. (United States); Francesco Marsili, Facebook Inc. (United States)
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    We have extensively modeled the variations in the DCS signal, for both global and a spatially localized neuronal activation using Monte Carlo simulations. We have considered the impact of neuronal cell movement, blood vessel wall dilation, and blood flow and volume changes induced by neuronal activities. We found that neuronal cell motion induced DCS signal variation is beyond the sensitivity of currently available DCS systems. The hemodynamic response can be detected with a time of 550 ms after neuronal activation for a system with a signal to noise ratio (SNR) of 300, which is technologically feasible with SPAD cameras.
    11946-18
    Author(s): Aahana Bajracharya, Arefeh Sherafati, Joseph P. Culver, Jonathan E. Peelle, Washington Univ. in St. Louis (United States)
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    The quality of speech signals and the inherent contextual cues are essential for effective spoken communication. Our research aims to identify the neural basis of effortful listening for speech altered in linguistic complexity and acoustic clarity. We leverage the strength of HD-DOT to measure cortical responses due to naturalistic stimuli such as stories. Comparisons of stimulus complexity (words vs. stories) and clarity (clear vs. acoustically degraded stories) for seven young adult participants show the recruitment of higher-order brain regions such as the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and inferior parietal cortex for the more effortful conditions, suggesting the involvement of domain-general processing.
    11946-19
    Author(s): Mitchell B. Robinson, Athinoula A. Martinos Ctr. for Biomedical Imaging (United States), Harvard-MIT Health Sciences and Technology (United States); Nisan Ozana, Marco Renna, Alyssa Martin, Stefan A. Carp, Sava Sakadžic, Maria A. Franceschini, Athinoula A. Martinos Ctr. for Biomedical Imaging (United States)
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    Interferometric diffuse correlation spectroscopy (iDCS) is a recently developed heterodyne detection method based on diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) which enables high speed (>50Hz), high SNR measurements of cerebral blood flow. To further improve upon this method, we perform iDCS at a longer wavelength (1064 nm), which has many demonstrated benefits compared to the traditional NIR wavelength range (650 – 850 nm). In this work, we perform direct comparisons between long wavelength iDCS and long wavelength DCS utilizing state-of-the-art superconducting nanowire detectors during phantom experiments and in vivo physiologic manipulations to demonstrate the performance of this new technique.
    11946-20
    Author(s): Zachary E. Markow, Kalyan Tripathy, Jason W. Trobaugh, Washington Univ. in St. Louis (United States); Alexa M. Svoboda, Univ. of Cincinnati (United States); Mariel L. Schroeder, Purdue Univ. (United States); Sean M. Rafferty, Edward J. Richter, Adam T. Eggebrecht, Washington Univ. in St. Louis (United States); Mark A. Anastasio, Univ. of Illinois (United States); Joseph P. Culver, Washington Univ. in St. Louis (United States)
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    Functional magnetic resonance imaging has decoded complex information about naturalistic stimuli using brain responses, but other non-invasive technologies have not achieved similar decoding capabilities. To evaluate feasibility of naturalistic visual decoding with diffuse optical tomography (DOT), a 6.5-mm-spaced optode grid was employed to decode which of four naturalistic, 90-second movie clips was viewed by human subjects. Over 85% average decoding accuracy was achieved using a template-matching decoder. Average accuracy remained above 60% and above chance using a model-based decoder to identify 4 and 40 clips outside the decoder's training set, respectively. DOT therefore has potential for more-complex neural decoding tasks.
    Session 6: Novel Techniques
    11946-22
    Author(s): Qiuyuan Zhong, The Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong, China); Chen-Yuan Dong, National Taiwan Univ. (Taiwan); Xinlei Fu, Xiayi Xu, Shih-Chi Chen, The Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong, China)
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    Fast and accurate drug screening can significantly improve the survival rate of cancer patients. Here, we present a new drug screening platform for cancer treatment based on an integrated precision microtome and LiMo microscope. Through this platform, tumor specimens from patients are first sectioned into 100-micron thick tissue slices and cultured for a few days; next, the live tumor tissue array is tested with different anti-cancer drugs for a few weeks and regularly 3D imaged at subcellular resolution, realizing personalized medicine. Our preliminary study on human oral cancer tissue has confirmed the feasibility of the drug screening platform.
    11946-23
    Author(s): Abigail L. Magee, Calamity Svoboda, Alvin S. Agato, Ed Richter, Joseph P. Culver, Adam T. Eggebrecht, Washington Univ. in St. Louis (United States)
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    Image reconstruction with functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) and high density diffuse optical tomography (HD-DOT) rely on anatomical models that adequately capture the head size and shape for accurate data registration. Optical brain imaging studies in infants and toddlers without MRI present challenges in model generation because individual differences in scalp morphometry across early development lead to poor matches with atlas-based models. Additionally, current photometric methods are limited due to the presence of hair. We present herein the scalp surface estimation technique, validated with participant specific MRI, that accurately provides the head shape in the presence of hair.
    11946-24
    Author(s): Xiaodan Wang, Annie R. Bice, Jonah Padawer-Curry, Zachary P. Rosenthal, Jin-Moo Lee, Adam Q. Bauer, Washington Univ. School of Medicine in St. Louis (United States)
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    Understanding how different central nervous system diseases affect different components of neurovascular coupling will allow for linking changes in neural or metabolic dysfunction to changes in hemodynamic signaling upon which blood-based imaging methods rely. We developed a dual fluorophore imaging system for simultaneous, high-speed mapping of neural, metabolic, and hemodynamic activity. Proof-of-concept measurements of spontaneous and stimulus-evoked dynamics are presented in awake and anesthetized mice. This flexible hardware platform allows for integrating optogenetic stimulation for all optical neural circuit interrogation and readout, and for examining the interaction between multiple cell populations.
    Session 7: Microscopy II
    11946-26
    Author(s): Dongli Xu, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Jun Ding, Stanford Univ. (United States); Leilei Peng, The Univ. of Arizona (United States)
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    Light-sheet fluorescence microscopy serves as a fast high-resolution imaging method for neural imaging. However, its 3D imaging ability is often limited by the speed of scanning the detection focal plane in the z-direction. Herein, we develop a rapid random z-access two-photon light-sheet microscope, which incorporates a two-photon Bessel beam light-sheet microscope with a dynamically driven electrical tunable lens (ETL). With a precise ETL calibration process and a novel rapid random z-access method, our system can selectively scan any desired z-section in the 3D imaging volume at the speed of 100 frame-per-second, and allows neural activates monitoring on the living brain tissue at video rate.
    11946-27
    Author(s): John Giblin, Sreekanth Kura, John Jiang, David A. Boas, Ichun A. Chen, Boston Univ. (United States)
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    The transient and repeated disruption of capillary flow has gained recent interest for its role in disease pathology. To efficiently capture and analyze cerebral capillary flow for the occurrence of stalling, we used a home-built Bessel beam two-photon microscope to monitor hundreds of capillaries at once. We then automatically extracted intensity traces along capillary lengths and used a correlation-based approach to identify if flow has stalled frame to frame.
    Session 8: Diffused Optical Imaging III
    11946-28
    Author(s): Monalisa Munsi, Arefeh Sherafati, Adam T. Eggebrecht, Washington Univ. School of Medicine in St. Louis (United States); Tracy M. Burns-Yocum, Indiana Univ. (United States); Heather M. Lugar, Washington Univ. School of Medicine in St. Louis (United States); Anagha Narayanan, Tulane Univ. School of Medicine (United States); Tasha Doty, Sarah A. Eisenstein, Alexandra M. Svoboda, Mariel L. Schroeder, Abraham Z. Snyder, Mwiza Ushe, Joseph P. Culver, Tamara Hershey, Washington Univ. School of Medicine in St. Louis (United States)
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    Deep-brain stimulation (DBS) of the ventro-intermediate nucleus of the thalamus (VIM) can provide substantial clinical motor benefit to Essential Tremor (ET) patients. However, the DBS impact on the functional connectivity (FC) of networks is difficult to study using standard neuroimaging modalities either due to limited temporal resolution (PET) or safety concerns from contraindications (fMRI). In this study, we tested the feasibility and sensitivity of High-Density Diffuse Optical Tomography (HD-DOT), which avoids these concerns, for mapping cortical blood flow responses to sensory stimuli and measuring resting state cortical FC in ET patients with VIM DBS OFF vs ON.
    11946-29
    Author(s): Behzad Khajavi, Athinoula A. Martinos Ctr. for Biomedical Imaging (United States); Mitchell B. Robinson, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); Maria A. Franceschini, Stefan A. Carp, Athinoula A. Martinos Ctr. for Biomedical Imaging (United States)
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    Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy (DCS) is a noninvasive, portable technique for measuring and monitoring cerebral blood flow (CBF) and has gained significant attention recently because of its promising results. However, at-depth measurement demands greater separation of source-detector which reduces the signal to noise ratio (SNR). Implementing interferometric detection (iDCS) and applying multi-speckle detection have been shown to increase the SNR. Combining these methods with using 1064nm wavelength light, we developed a high performance, multi-channel interferometric multi-speckle DCS (MiDCS) system that utilizes a long coherence laser and an ultra-fast InGaAs linescan camera to measure the tissue blood flow index (BFi).
    11946-30
    Author(s): Max deJong, Washington Univ. in St. Louis (United States); Guy Perkins, Hamid Deghani, Univ. of Birmingham (United Kingdom); Adam Eggebrecht, Washington Univ. School of Medicine in St. Louis (United States)
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    High density diffuse optical tomography (HD-DOT) is a functional neuroimaging method that uses multiple overlapping and multi-distance functional near-infrared spectroscopy measurements in a dense grid array. Herein, we investigate multiple frequency and matrix scaling strategies to improve frequency domain HD-DOT methods and use simulations of point spread functions in anatomical models to assess the improvement attainable over standard methods. We observe a small improvement in image quality metrics by adding multiple modulation frequencies, and a significant improvement after column scaling sensitivity matrices. These methods may advance image quality of HD-DOT beyond current limitations.
    Session 9: Brain Activities II
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    Herein, we screened Aβ42-specific preferred antibody pairs 1F12/1F12 and 1F12/2C6 to accurately detect Aβ42 types using sandwich ELISA, including total Aβ42, Aβ42 oligomers (Aβ42Os), and Aβ42 monomers (Aβ42Ms). The levels of Aβ42 species in the brain, blood, and intestines of different aged APP/PS1 mice were quantified to study their correlation with AD progression. Total Aβ42 levels in the blood were not correlated with AD progression, but Aβ42Ms levels in the blood of 9-month-old APP/PS1 mice were significantly reduced, and Aβ42Os levels in the brain were significantly elevated compared to 3-month-old APP/PS1, demonstrating that the levels of Aβ42Ms and Aβ42Os in the blood and brain were correlated with AD progression.
    11946-32
    Author(s): Paul Shin, Qi Pian, Buyin Fu, Chongzhao Ran, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States); Sergei A. Vinogradov, Univ. of Pennsylvania (United States); Eng H. Lo, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States); Anna Devor, Boston Univ. (United States); Sava Sakadžic, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)
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    Although the beneficial effects of regular physical exercise on brain aging and neurodegenerative diseases are well recognized, a clear understanding of how exercise leads to such benefits remains elusive. In this work, we investigated the effects of normal aging on cortical microvascular oxygenation, perfusion, and morphology and the impact of four months of voluntary wheel running on cortical microvascular oxygenation in 20 months old mice. We used two-photon microscopy to assess age-related and exercise-induced changes in the distributions of capillary oxygen partial pressure (PO2) and red-blood-cell flux across cortical depth in awake mice. Our finding suggests the mitigating effect of exercise on the progression of age-related changes in capillary oxygenation in deeper cortical layers which may be related to health-enhancing benefits of exercise in elderly individuals.
    11946-33
    Author(s): Elena Montagni, Francesco Resta, LENS - Lab. Europeo di Spettroscopie Non-Lineari (Italy); Giacomo Mazzamuto, LENS - Lab. Europeo di Spettroscopie Non-Lineari (Italy), Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, CNR (Italy); Alessandro Scaglione, Univ. degli Studi di Firenze (Italy); Barbara Spagnolo, Marco Pisanello, Leonardo Sileo, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (Italy); Massimo De Vittorio, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (Italy), Univ. del Salento (Italy); Ferruccio Pisanello, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (Italy); Anna Letizia Allegra Mascaro, LENS - Lab. Europeo di Spettroscopie Non-Lineari (Italy), Istituto di Neuroscienze, CNR (Italy); Francesco Saverio Pavone, LENS - Lab. Europeo di Spettroscopie Non-Lineari (Italy), Univ. degli Studi di Firenze (Italy), Istituto di Neuroscienze, CNR (Italy)
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    The relationship between cortical and striatal activity has been extensively studied in terms of cortico-striatal projections, but striato-cortical communications is largely unexplored. To dissect striato-cortical connectivity, we used a tapered optical fiber to optogenetically stimulate targeted domains of striatum in channelrhodopsin(ChR2)-expressing Drd1-Cre awake mice. A microelectrode implanted on the fiber allowed to simultaneous record the local field potential from dorsolateral striatum during stimulation in mice transfected by PHP-AAV-CaMKII-GCaMP7s for large-scale recording of striatal-evoked cortical activity. Preliminary results showed that optogenetic activation of DRD1+ neurons in dorsomedial striatum evoked complex forelimb movements associated with large calcium transients in motor cortices.
    Posters
    Conference attendees are invited to attend the BiOS poster session. Come view the posters, enjoy light refreshments, ask questions, and network with colleagues in your field.

    View poster presentation guidelines and set-up instructions at:
    https://spie.org/PW/Poster-Guidelines
    11946-34
    Author(s): Mohamed Baghdad, LENS - Lab. Europeo di Spettroscopie Non-Lineari (Italy)
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    3D reconstruction of the human brain at high resolution is one of the most important challenges of neuroscience to provide anatomical information useful to decipher the neuronal pattern in healthy and diseased conditions. Here, we present a new pipeline that combines a new clearing method, advanced Light Sheet Microscopy and a data management system. We applied our methodology to the Broca’s area, obtaining volumetric reconstruction of slices labeled with two different neuronal markers: NeuN and GAD67, to discriminate the excitatory and the inhibitory population of neurons; and with NeuN and CR, to further characterize the neuronal inhibitory sub-population.In conclusion, the proposed combination of specialized tissue preparation protocol, advanced LSFM, and big data analysis allows a fast mapping of the human brain architecture at the cellular level, paving the way to routinary analysis able to reconstruct different tissue blocks up to the entire organ.
    11946-36
    Author(s): Hunter Banks, Shengxuan Chen, Jonathan Bumstead, Lindsey Brier, Annie Bice, Seana Gaines, Joseph Culver, Washington Univ. in St. Louis (United States)
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    Obtaining high signal to noise ratio is challenging in wide-field two photon microscopy and one must ensure the mouse brain can be imaged safely under high laser power. Here, we demonstrated a simultaneous thermal imaging and two photon imaging technique. The maximum temperature of the cortex was below 39°C using 400mW laser power with a 5 x 5mm field of view. Together with the brain activities under hind paw stimulation and at rest, we argued that high laser power for wide-field two-photon imaging can potentially be used while keeping the temperature under safety limit.
    11946-37
    Author(s): Qi Pian, Athinoula A. Martinos Ctr. for Biomedical Imaging (United States); Baoqiang Li, Athinoula A. Martinos Ctr. for Biomedical Imaging (United States), The Brain Cognition and Brain Disease Institute of Shenzhen Institute of Advanced Technology (China); Ikbal Sencan, Athinoula A. Martinos Ctr. for Biomedical Imaging (United States); Xiaojun Cheng, Jay Dubb, Boston Univ. (United States); Xinyue Huang, Buyin Fu, Athinoula A. Martinos Ctr. for Biomedical Imaging (United States); Sergei A. Vinogradov, Perelman School of Medicine (United States), Univ. of Pennsylvania (United States); David A. Boas, Boston Univ. (United States); Sava Sakadžic, Athinoula A. Martinos Ctr. for Biomedical Imaging (United States)
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    We report the implementation and demonstration of an imaging system that combines two-photon phosphorescence lifetime microscopy (2PLM) and adaptive optics for improving oxygen partial pressure (pO2) measurement accuracy in deep cortical layers of mice. The technique retrieves the background signal by forming an aberrated torus focus on the sample plane with an optical phase mask imposed on the system wavefront and subtracts it from normal phosphorescence emission signal. The proposed method is validated with intravascular pO2 measurements from six mice imaged at up to ~600 μm depth.
    11946-38
    Author(s): Johanna Gesperger, Medizinische Univ. Wien (Austria); Karl-Heinz Nenning, Medizinische Univ. Wien (Austria), The Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research (United States); Conrad W. Merkle, Antonia Lichtenegger, Pablo Eugui, Thomas Roetzer, Barbara Kiesel, Petra A. Mercea, Alexandra Lang, Georg Langs, Georg Widhalm, Bernhard Baumann, Adelheid Wöhrer, Medizinische Univ. Wien (Austria)
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    The fluorescent tracer 5-aminolevulinc acid was introduced to visualize brain tumors intraoperatively, but suffers from drawbacks such as limited sensitivity for certain tumor types. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive imaging modality, which has recently found its application in neuroscience by contributing label-free tissue information. We present one of the first radiomics-based analyses to capture the form and texture of glioma samples resected during fluorescence-guided surgery in a large cohort of multimodal OCT-based microscopy (OCM) imaging data. Concluding, we report encouraging results for the prediction of tumor infiltration, entity and molecular biomarkers with accuracies as high as 96%.
    11946-39
    Author(s): Xiaojie Chen, Natalie Fomin-Thunemann, Emily Martin, Boston Univ. (United States); Cleide Angolano, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Ctr. (United States); Anna Devor, Boston Univ. (United States), Athinoula A. Martinos Ctr. for Biomedical Imaging (United States); Martin Thunemann, Boston Univ. (United States); Nicholas Todd, Brigham and Women's Hospital (United States)
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    Focused ultrasound (FUS) is an emerging technology for non-invasive and controlled blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening for drug delivery successfully tested in clinical trials. To improve the safety of this method, we use optical imaging techniques to better understand the relationship between repeated FUS-BBB opening, neuroinflammation, and alteration of neurovascular coupling in an animal model. We perform 1- and 2-photon microscopy in awake mice to image neuronal activity hemodynamics. Before and following FUS treatment, optical imaging sessions access changes in neuronal activity and/or hemodynamics; FUS treatments are repeated several times to approximate a clinical schedule.
    11946-40
    Author(s): Shuaibin Chang, Boston Univ. (United States); Hui Wang, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States), Athinoula A. Martinos Ctr. for Biomedical Imaging (United States); Jiarui Yang, Boston Univ. (United States); Bruce Fischl, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States), Athinoula A. Martinos Ctr. for Biomedical Imaging (United States); Shih-Chi Chen, The Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong (China); Ann C. McKee, David A. Boas, Ichun A. Chen, Boston Univ. (United States)
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    The human brain is structured into cytoarchitectonic and myeloarchitectonic areas consist of neuronal cells, dendrites and myelinated axons. The micro-resolution volumetric investigation of the brain cytoarchitectonic and myeloarchitectonic structure holds the key for various neurological studies including neuroanatomy and neurodegenerative processes. Here, we provide multiple structural and biological features including cortical structures, vessel networks, myelin content, axonal fibers, and cell bodies from a single scan with our serial sectioning PSOCT-2P system. Those features enable a broad band of neuroscience studies including the investigation of neuropathological alterations in Alzheimer’s disease and Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) patients.
    11946-41
    Author(s): Shuaibin Chang, Boston Univ. (United States); Hui Wang, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States), Athinoula A. Martinos Ctr. for Biomedical Imaging (United States); Jiarui Yang, Boston Univ. (United States); Bruce Fischl, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States), Athinoula A. Martinos Ctr. for Biomedical Imaging (United States); Shih-Chi Chen, The Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong (China); Ann McKee, David Boas, Ichun Chen, Boston Univ. (United States)
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    The human brain is structured into cytoarchitectonic and myeloarchitectonic areas consist of neuronal cells, dendrites and myelinated axons. The micro-resolution volumetric investigation of the brain cytoarchitectonic and myeloarchitectonic structure holds the key for various neurological studies including neuroanatomy and neurodegenerative processes. Here, we provide multiple structural and biological features including cortical structures, vessel networks, myelin content, axonal fibers, and cell bodies from a single scan with our serial sectioning PSOCT-2P system. Those features enable a broad band of neuroscience studies including the investigation of neuropathological alterations in Alzheimer’s disease and Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) patients.
    11946-42
    Author(s): Walker J. O'Brien, Antonio Martinez, Robert Bing, Parya Farzam, De'Ja Rogers, Alexander von Lühmann, David Boas, Bernhard Zimmerman, Boston Univ. (United States)
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    Functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) technology has become a valuable tool for neuroimaging, but weight and portability are still a concern. We present an open-source, modular, wearable fNIRS system capable of high density optode arrangements with sufficient portability for use in real-world applications. The NinjaNIRS 2021 system iterates on the progress made with our previous NinjaNIRS 2020 system, utilizing the same control unit but with improvements to the user interface and optode design. Two new optode modules have replaced the dual source and detector optode, one dual wavelength LED source and one detector with integrated ADC.
    11946-45
    Author(s): Dongyu Li, Lu Deng, Zhengwu Hu, Tingting Yu, Dan Zhu, Wuhan National Research Ctr. for Optoelectronics (China), Huazhong Univ. of Science and Technology (China)
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    Urokinase is a commonly used thrombolytic drug with good thrombolytic effect, long treatment time window and low price, but cases of ineffective treatment occur. Vascular size affects the effectiveness of thrombolytic drug therapy. This study combined the optical clearing skull window and thrombin-combined photothrombosis to achieve targeted ischemic stroke model with embolic components consistent with clinical thrombus, while preserving the intact skull. Then we explored the effect of vessel size on urokinase thrombolytic therapy. It provides strong support for the basic research of thrombolytic drugs, and holds potential to provide basis for clinical medication of cerebral thrombosis.
    Conference Chair
    Hainan Univ. (China)
    Conference Chair
    Stanford Univ. Medical Ctr. (United States)
    Conference Chair
    Huazhong Univ. of Science and Technology (China)
    Program Committee
    Boston Univ. (United States)
    Program Committee
    The Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong, China)
    Program Committee
    Univ. of Maryland, College Park (United States)
    Program Committee
    Javier DeFelipe
    Univ. Politécnica de Madrid (Spain)
    Program Committee
    Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States)
    Program Committee
    Stony Brook Univ. (United States)
    Program Committee
    Tufts Univ. (United States)
    Program Committee
    Na Ji
    Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)
    Program Committee
    Korea Univ. (Korea, Republic of)
    Program Committee
    HUST-Suzhou Institute for Brainsmatics (China)
    Program Committee
    Francesco Saverio Pavone
    European Lab. for Non-linear Spectroscopy (Italy)
    Program Committee
    Wyant College of Optical Sciences (United States)
    Program Committee
    Columbia Univ. (United States)
    Program Committee
    Northwestern Univ. (United States)
    Program Committee
    Zhejiang Univ. (China)
    Program Committee
    Saratov State Univ. (Russian Federation)
    Program Committee
    NYU Langone Health (United States)
    Program Committee
    Huazhong Univ. of Science and Technology (China)