Plasmonics: Design, Materials, Fabrication, Characterization, and Applications is currently undergoing intense developments. Novel plasmonic materials, structures, and phenomena covered under this topic span broad multidisciplinary interests from fundamental optics, physics, and chemistry to applications in nanophotonics, biophotonics, green photonics, and biomedicine.

The Plasmonics: Design, Materials, Fabrication, Characterization, and Applications conference requires a 500-word Abstract for Review.

Papers are solicited in the following areas:

Theory, simulation, and design across all subareas Plasmonic materials and structure fabrications Plasmonic phenomena and characterization Plasmonics devices and systems ;
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Conference 11797

Plasmonics: Design, Materials, Fabrication, Characterization, and Applications XIX

In person: 1 - 3 August 2021 | Conv. Ctr. Room 4
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  • Opening Remarks
  • In Memoriam: Mark Stockman
  • 1: Fundamentals of Plasmonics I
  • 2: Metasurfaces I
  • 3: Plasmonic Materials and Nanostructures I
  • 4: Plasmonic Applications I
  • 5: Metasurfaces II
  • 6: Plasmonic Laser
  • 7: Nonlinear I
  • 8: Fundamentals of Plasmonics II
  • 9: Plasmonic Applications II
  • 14: Radiation Engineering
  • 10: Plasmonic Materials and Nanostructures II
  • 11: Active Control
  • 12: Metasurfaces III
  • 13: Nonlinear II
  • Nanoscience + Engineering Plenary Session
  • Nanoscience + Engineering Plenary Networking Event
  • 15: Plasmonic Sensing
  • 16: Fundamental of Plasmonics III
  • 17: Metasurfaces IV
  • 18: Thermal Plasmonics
  • Live Remote Keynote Session: Nanoscience + Engineering Applications I
  • Live Remote Keynote Session: Nanoscience + Engineering Applications II
  • Poster Session
Session R1: Opening Remarks
In person / Livestream: 1 August 2021 • 8:30 AM - 8:40 AM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 4
Opening Remarks by Chairs Din Ping Tsai, Takuo Tanaka, and Yu-Jung Lu.
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Author(s): Din Ping Tsai, The Hong Kong Polytechnic Univ. (Hong Kong, China); Takuo Tanaka, RIKEN (Japan); Yu-Jung Lu, Research Ctr. for Applied Sciences - Academia Sinica (Taiwan)
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Session R2: In Memoriam: Mark Stockman
In person / Livestream: 1 August 2021 • 8:40 AM - 9:00 AM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 4
Join us for a memorial session for Mark Stockman, presented by Vladimir Shalaev and Alexandra Boltasseva
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Author(s): Yu-Jung Lu, Research Ctr. for Applied Sciences - Academia Sinica (Taiwan); Takuo Tanaka, RIKEN (Japan); Din Ping Tsai, The Hong Kong Polytechnic Univ. (Hong Kong, China)
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Session 1: Fundamentals of Plasmonics I
In person / Livestream: 1 August 2021 • 9:00 AM - 10:10 AM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 4
Session Chairs: Alexandra Boltasseva, Purdue Univ. (United States), Deep Jariwala, Univ. of Pennsylvania (United States)
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Author(s): Zhaxylyk A. Kudyshev, Purdue Univ. (United States), Quantum Science Ctr., Oak Ridge National Lab. (United States); Alexander Kildishev, Purdue Univ. (United States); Alexandra Boltasseva, Vladimir M. Shalaev, Purdue Univ. (United States), Quantum Science Ctr., Oak Ridge National Lab. (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 1 August 2021
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In this talk we will highlight our most recent developments in 1) deep learning assisted optimization of photonic meta-structures and 2) machine learning-based algorithms for quantum photonic applications. We will discuss our studies on implementing deep-learning assisted topology optimization for advanced metasurface design development. We will also outline our recent work on merging topology optimization techniques with quantum device design development for achieving efficient on-chip integration. Finally, we will discuss approaches for implementing a novel convolutional neural network-based technique for real-time material defect metrology and quantum super-resolution microscopy applications.
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Optical Fourier surfaces (Invited Paper)
Author(s): David J. Norris, ETH Zurich (Switzerland)
On demand | Presented Live 1 August 2021
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Gratings and holograms are patterned surfaces that tailor optical signals by diffraction. Despite the long history of such structures, further advances could exploit Fourier optics, which specifies the surface pattern that generates a desired diffracted output through its Fourier transform. The required surface profile should contain a precise sum of sinusoidal waves, each with a well-defined amplitude, spatial frequency, and phase, to shape the optical wavefront. However, because fabrication techniques typically yield profiles with at most a few depth levels, complex “wavy” surfaces cannot be obtained, limiting the straightforward mathematical design and implementation of sophisticated diffractive optics. In this presentation, we will discuss a simple yet powerful approach to eliminate this design–fabrication mismatch by demonstrating optical surfaces that contain an arbitrary number of specified sinusoids.
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Author(s): Federico Capasso, Ahmed H. Dorrah, Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (United States)
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Recent advances in wavefront shaping have led to new classes of structured light; hence, uncovering novel phenomena and facilitating new applications. We review recent progress in these areas and highlight our efforts in structuring all degrees of freedom of light; including the phase, amplitude, polarization state, and orbital angular momentum of light both in three-dimensional space and time. Notably, we showcase scenarios in which the propagation dynamics of structured vector beams are governed by a topological phase factor (i.e., the Berry phase) in addition to the regular propagation phase. This in turn redefines basic phenomena in optics encountered by these beams; such as Snell’s law, phase matching and resonance conditions. We finally present new directions in creating time-varying near-field structures using frequency-gradient plasmonic based devices.
Session 2: Metasurfaces I
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Author(s): Kaoru Tamada, Shi Ting Lee, Shihomi Masuda, Thasaneeya Kuboki, Yusuke Arima, Satoru Kidoaki, Kyushu Univ. (Japan); Koichi Okamoto, Osaka Prefecture Univ. (Japan); Yukiko Aida, Sou Ryuzaki, Kyushu Univ. (Japan)
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Recently we have developed LSPR-mediated high resolution live-cell imaging techniques for adhesive cells on plasmonic metasurface composed of self-assembled gold or silver nanoparticles. Compared with other super-resolution microscopy techniques, our LSPR-mediated imaging is extremely simple but quite effective for monitoring the molecular dynamics at a nanointerface. The LSPR of the plasmonic metasurface provides high-contrast interfacial images due to the confined light within a region a few tens of nanometers from the particles and the enhancement of fluorescence. The improved lateral resolution reaches down to the theoretical limit even during cell movement due to the properties of the metasurface with an extremely high refractive index. In the presentation, we will present our latest imaging data concerning molecular dynamics in live cells, which were not visualized by other super-resolution imaging methods with low temporal resolution.
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Author(s): Mu-Ku Chen, The Hong Kong Polytechnic Univ. (Hong Kong, China); Maoxiong Zhao, Fudan Univ. (China); Ze-peng Zhuang, Sun Yat-Sen Univ. (China); Yongfeng Wu, The Hong Kong Polytechnic Univ. (Hong Kong, China); Xiaoyuan Liu, Hong Kong Polytechnic Univ. (Hong Kong, China); Yan Yue, Jingcheng Zhang, Jiaqi Yuan, Zhengnan Zhang, The Hong Kong Polytechnic Univ. (Hong Kong, China); Shumin Xiao, Harbin Institute of Technology (China); Lei Shi, Fudan Univ. (China); Jian-Wen Dong, Sun Yat-Sen Univ. (China); Jian Zi, Fudan Univ. (China); Din Ping Tsai, The Hong Kong Polytechnic Univ. (Hong Kong, China)
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In recent years, Meta-lens has become a new type of optical device, showing excellent performance and novel applications. The nanoantennas of meta-lens can be used to control the phase, amplitude, and polarization at well. The phase part is the most important part of the function of the meta-lens. However, so far, the phase distribution of meta-lenses has not been directly measured, which further hinders the quantitative evaluation of their performance. We have developed an interferometric imaging phase measurement system for meta-lens and meta-devices. This system can measure the phase distribution by shooting the interference pattern. The phase distribution of meta-lenses can be measured to quantitatively characterize the imaging performance. Our meta-lens phase measurement system can help for designers to optimize the design, for manufacturers to identify defects, thereby improving the manufacturing process. This work will pave the way for meta-lens in industrial applications.
Session 3: Plasmonic Materials and Nanostructures I
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Author(s): Andrea Alù, The City Univ. of New York (United States)
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In this talk, I discuss our recent research activity in tailoring the scattering of nanostructures and metamaterials, with an emphasis on plasmonic phenomena. I will discuss unusual nano-optical responses associated with topological features, including embedded eigenstates, knots in the band diagram of arrays of plasmonic particles, and exotic scattering responses and absorption phenomena enabled by temporal variations. While our results in this context are mostly theoretical in nature, during the talk, I will also discuss the influence of loss and a path towards experimental verification of these concepts.
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Author(s): Sachiko Matsushita, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan)
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The demand for the fabrication of nanostructures consisting of metal and dielectric is increasing with the development of new plasmonic optics. Since 1997, the presenter has produced various dielectric nanostructures by the bottom-up method and reported their optical and electrochemical properties such as light propagation in two-dimensional polystyrene colloidal crystals[1], the electron emission of diamond nanorods arrays[2], photochemical micro beakers composed of TiO2[3], etc. The advantages of the bottom-up method are that you can easily try various materials in addition to being able to easily perform experiments at the laboratory level. In this presentation, we will report about the various nanostructures fabricated using thermal dewetting process of metal/dielectric interface[4], focusing on the application to the plasmonic color pigment and microfluid devices. 1 Chem. Commun. 2004, 506. 2 Chem. Lett. 2000, 29, 534. 3 Chem. Lett. 1997, 925. 4 Nanoscale Adv., 2020, 2, 2271.
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Author(s): Andrei Kiselev, Debdatta Ray, Olivier J. F. Martin, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (Switzerland)
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We explore the physics underlying the scattering response of a hybrid metal-dielectric nanoantenna made of a metal disk placed on top of a dielectric cylinder. We observe that such hybrid system is quite rich in terms of the physics of the interaction between the resonances excited in the dielectric and metallic parts. For example, the anapole state from the dielectric is also observed in the metal in this case; also, Cartesian multipoles excited in two parts lead to an intricate far-field response. The hybridization of the modes enables to obtain a very sharp scattering response at a desired energy that we experimentally utilize for sensing.
Session 4: Plasmonic Applications I
In person / Livestream: 1 August 2021 • 11:00 AM - 11:30 AM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 4
Session Chair: David J. Norris, ETH Zurich (Switzerland)
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Author(s): Deep Jariwala, Univ. of Pennsylvania (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 1 August 2021
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Two-Dimensional (2D) chalcogenides of Mo and W are semiconductors that show strong excitonic responses due to their highly quantum-confined character. This talk will discuss our recent work on optical phenomena and electronic phenomena in 2D semiconductors when they are placed in close proximity on plasmonic substrates such as Au, Ag and Al. I will present how 1D nanostructuring of Mos2, WS2, WSe2 etc. into nanophotonic dielectric gratings can enable exploration of new regimes of light-matter confinement including formation of hybrid exciton-plasmon-polariton states. I will extend this concept to 2D hybrid pervoskites and superlattices. Finally, I will also show how using a plasmonic tip once can use near-field tip based micro-spectroscopy to probe defects, interfaces and hybrid states in 2D excitonic semiconductors
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Author(s): Jeremy N. Munday, Univ. of California, Davis (United States)
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High conductivity metals have long been the material of choice for traditional electronics, and over the past two decades low-loss metals have led to many novel optical devices and structures as a result of plasmonic confinement. As these fields merge, metal optoelectronics using hot carrier effects may pave the way for new device architectures with improved flexibility, frequency response, and ultrafast time-dynamics. In this presentation, we will discuss our recent work building hot electron photodetectors for NIR detection using Si and metal oxides, improved response using nanoscale metal alloys, and time-resolved ultrafast detection via pump-probe techniques exploiting surface plasmon excitation. Further, we will show how the incorporation of index near zero (INZ) substrates can lead to nearly 100% absorption in thin metal films, providing a new platform for hot electron devices. We will conclude with an outlook and discuss future possibilities with these novel material systems.
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Author(s): Giulia Tagliabue, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (Switzerland)
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Due to their tunable light absorption characteristics and ability to generate hot carriers, plasmonic-metal nanostructures offer unique opportunities for light energy harnessing and conversion devices, from photodetectors to photoelectrochemical cells. In this talk I will show examples of functional devices and discuss in-depth the underlying physical mechanisms, with a special attention to the role of the metal properties. In particular, I will report recent results on ultrafast dynamics of hot holes as well as solid-state investigation of copper-based systems and I will discuss new opportunities for material synthesis and solar-energy storage applications.
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Author(s): Maria Vanessa B. Oguchi, Norihiko Hayazawa, Takuo Tanaka, RIKEN (Japan)
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Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) done in ambient conditions opens the door to characterize the as-fabricated properties of nanodevices in their operating environment with both high spatial resolution and high chemical sensitivity. With sub-nanometer resolution now achievable using our TERS system in ambient, we can image nanoscale strain variations in graphene and study the strain distribution in such local domains. The effects of high photon confinement are also investigated, whose immediate manifestation is the plasmonic activation of certain Raman modes. This leads to the question of how to analyze strain at the near-field, which is quite relevant today as technology continuous to grow ever smaller.
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Author(s): Istvan Csarnovics, The Univ. of Debrecen (Hungary)
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In this work, the performance of Au/Ag nanoislands was investigated for SERS and LSPR applications. The nanoislands were generated by thermally annealing thin layers of silver and gold, which were previously sputtered onto glass surfaces. Pure metallic (silver and gold nanoparticles – AuNP and AgNP) system was evaluated based on their plasmonic and SERS sensitivity. The sensitivity of LSPR and SERS based devices are strongly depending on the used material and also on the size and geometry of the metallic nanoparticles. By controlling these parameters the plasmon absorption band can be tuned and the sensitivity can be optimized. It was found that the enhancement factor (which characterizes the increase in the peak shift for multi-particle arrangements compared to single-particle models) depends on the size of the nanoparticles and on the distance between the particles. The efficiency can be maximized by increasing the nanoisland size, and by reducing the particle distance.
Session 5: Metasurfaces II
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Author(s): Benjamin W. Cerjan, Burak Gerislioglu, Rice Univ. (United States); Sravya Nuguri, James J. Watkins, Univ. of Massachusetts Amherst (United States); Stephan Link, Peter Nordlander, Naomi Halas, Rice Univ. (United States); Mark H. Griep, CCDC Army Research Lab. (United States)
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Substantial effort has been invested in generating narrow bandwidth visible colors from metasurfaces using a wide variety of geometries and materials. In this work we continue these explorations and demonstrate how a combination of a plasmonic Fano resonance and a Bragg reflector can contribute to the generation of narrowband visible colors. We demonstrate active tuning of these colors by stretching the array in the x- and y- directions and the reflector in z- to shift the colorimetric response of both elements. The combination of these two types of photonic structures allows for substantially increased flexibility in design and color-space tuning. Additionally, by fabricating these structures at scale, this methodology could prove useful towards the manufacture of agile metasurface color pixels
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Author(s): Isabelle Staude, Friedrich-Schiller-Univ. Jena (Germany)
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Typically, the functionality of an optical metasurface is “hard‐coded” in its fabricated design. However, it is highly desirable to dynamically tune or even freely program the metasurface functionality also after fabrication. Recently, we have demonstrated strong active tuning of spatially homogeneous Mie‐resonant silicon metasurface by integration into nematic liquid crystal cells. This talk will review our recent advances in this field. In particular, examples of dynamic wavefront control and emission pattern tuning will be discussed. Our results can be of interest for the realization of future metasurface-based devices that can be dynamically reconfigured on demand.
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Author(s): Chia-Hsiang Lin, Yu-Sheng Chen, Jhao-Ting Lin, Yi-Chen Cheng, National Cheng Kung Univ. (Taiwan); Amir Hassanfiroozi, National Chiao Tung Univ. (Taiwan); Hao Chung Wu, Hsuan-Ting Kuo, National Cheng Kung Univ. (Taiwan); Ruzan Sokhoyan, Ghazaleh Kafaie Shirmanesh, Wen-Hui Cheng, Harry Atwater, California Institute of Technology (United States); Pin Chieh Wu, National Cheng Kung Univ. (Taiwan)
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In this talk, I will present two strategies to realize high-performance metasurfaces. Firstly, by introducing the generalized kerker condition to the plasmonic metasurface, we acquired a circular cross-polarization conversion efficiency higher than 50% in transmission at telecom wavelengths. We also demonstrated a couple of meta-devices with record operating efficiency based on the proposed metasurface. Secondly, I will introduce the Monte Carlo tree search (MCTS) algorithm combined with unsupervised clustering for the inverse design of metasurfaces. With the proposed method, we realized a beam steering metasurface, which is capable of deflecting normally incident light into target directions with minimal sidelobes intensity.
Session 6: Plasmonic Laser
In person / Livestream: 1 August 2021 • 11:30 AM - 12:00 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 4
Session Chair: David J. Norris, ETH Zurich (Switzerland)
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Author(s): Jun Guan, Marc R. Bourgeois, Ran Li, Jingtian Hu, Northwestern Univ. (United States); Richard D. Schaller, Argonne National Lab. (United States); George C. Schatz, Teri W. Odom, Northwestern Univ. (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 1 August 2021
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Band structures engineering of periodic optical structures enables the control of light propagation and localization. Although photons trapped inside 2D lattices can be described within the first Brillouin zone in reciprocal space, the wavevectors of scattered photons outside the lattice are limited by the 3D light cone, which depicts the free-photon dispersion in the surroundings. Because plasmonic nanoparticle lattices show unique dual properties of light trapping and strong scattering, this material platform is promising for investigations of radiative losses. This talk describes how light-cone surface lattice resonance (SLRs) from plasmonic nanoparticle lattices allow the observation of radiated electromagnetic fields. We theoretically predicted the angular distributions of the radiated fields, and experimentally probed the light-cone SLR modes by in-plane lasing emission. These results provide a nanolaser design strategy to achieve tunable lasing colors by lattice rotation.
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Author(s): Hui W. Cao, Yale Univ. (United States)
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A metasurface hologram combines fine spatial resolution and large viewing angles with a planar form factor and compact size. However, it suffers coherent artifacts originating from electromagnetic cross-talk between meta-atoms and nanofabrication defects. We introduce an efficient method to remove all artifacts by fine-tuning the spatial coherence of illumination. Our method is implemented with a degenerate cavity laser, which allows precise, continuous tuning of spatial coherence over a wide range with little variation in emission spectrum and total power. We find the optimal degree of spatial coherence to remove the coherent artifacts of a meta-hologram while maintaining the image sharpness.
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Author(s): Tien-Chang Lu, National Chiao Tung Univ. (Taiwan)
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In this report, we successfully demonstrated the room temperature operated SPP nanolaser on the graphene-insulator-metal (GIM) platform that can actively modulate the characteristics of SPP wave. The lasing threshold and emission peak of ZnO nanowire on aluminum with graphene were manipulated according to the amount of current injected to the graphene due to the nonreciprocal and thermal effect.
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Author(s): Tsung Sheng Kao, National Chiao Tung Univ. (Taiwan)
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In this work, we will introduce our works on metal halide perovskite thin film random lasers and the latest finding of the enhanced lasing performance via in-situ AgI diffusion in perovskite materials. For the hybrid configuration, optical absorption is found to be evidently increased, indicating the availability of optical pumping fluences is prominently improved. Meanwhile, rugged film morphology and the corresponding chemical reaction are also observed and further investigated. Besides, by conducting a series of temperature-dependent cryogenic and a systematic power-dependent micro-PL measurement with different excitation wavelengths, the relationship in wavelength positions between each other can be validated, confirming the mechanism for the enhancement on light emission performance. Finally, for a such hybrid configuration, the corresponding randomlasing performance is found can be enhanced by a factor of three.
Session 7: Nonlinear I
In person / Livestream: 1 August 2021 • 1:30 PM - 2:00 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 4
Session Chairs: Deep Jariwala, Univ. of Pennsylvania (United States), Masud Mansuripur, Wyant College of Optical Sciences (United States)
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Author(s): Soham Saha, Zhaxylyk A. Kudyshev, Vladimir M. Shalaev, Alexandra Boltasseva, Purdue Univ. (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 1 August 2021
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Control over the permittivity and relaxation time in materials is important to gain control over the amplitude, phase and polarization of light. In this presentation, we report our work on controlling the static and dynamic optical properties of transition metal nitrides and transparent conducting oxides for a wide array of nanophotonic applications and nonlinear optical demonstrations. We find the carrier relaxation mechanism in titanium and zirconium nitride by pump-probe studies near the ENZ. We demonstrate high-harmonic generation in refractory TiN films. We show large changes in the epsilon-near-zero points in cadmium oxide via yttrium doping, for optically controlled, mid-IR reflectance modulation. In undoped zinc oxide, we demonstrate unity-order permittivity modulation by optical doping, with 20ps response time. With TiN-AZO Berreman-metasurfaces, we demonstrate simultaneous picosecond switching at telecom wavelengths, and nanosecond switching in the visible regime. Employing the ENZ effects in aluminum-doped zinc oxide, we demonstrate nonlinear optical phenomena spanning optical time-reversal to negative refraction. Our work will aid the development of dynamic devices for a wide array of dynamic optical applications.
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Author(s): Shi-Wei Chu, National Taiwan Univ. (Taiwan)
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Nonlinear optical effects are key toward communication, sensing, imaging, etc. Recently, we found nonlinear scattering/absorption in plasmonic and silicon nanostructures based on photothermal interactions, featuring high-contrast all-optical switching and non-bleaching super-resolution microscopy. The conventional method of quantifying optical nonlinearity is z-scan, which typically works with thin films, and thus acquires ensemble nonlinear responses, not from single nanostructure. Here we advocate an x-scan technique that is based on a confocal laser scanning microscope with both forward and backward detections, offering simultaneous quantification for nonlinear behavior of scattering, absorption and total attenuation from a single nanostructure.
Session 8: Fundamentals of Plasmonics II
In person / Livestream: 1 August 2021 • 2:00 PM - 2:20 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 4
Session Chairs: Deep Jariwala, Univ. of Pennsylvania (United States), Masud Mansuripur, Wyant College of Optical Sciences (United States)
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Author(s): Terefe G. Habteyes, Hamed Kookhaee, Tefera Tesema, The Univ. of New Mexico (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 1 August 2021
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We will present the manifestations of plasmon-molecule energy and electron transfer processes as observed surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). We observe that in presence of intermediary surface ligands, the electron transfer channel is turned off. On the other hand, the presence of surface ligands facilitates plasmon to molecule energy transfer (plasmon pumped adsorbate intramolecular electronic excitation) by orienting the analyte molecules along the surface field vector as well as by prolonging the excited state lifetime. The adsorbate excitation appears to be followed by singlet to triplet intersystem crossing that leads to singlet oxygen generation that initiates N-demethylation reaction as demonstrated using the reactivity of methylene.
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Author(s): Valentina Krachmalnicoff, Camilo R. Perez de la Vega, Kevin Chévrier, Yannick De Wilde, Institut Langevin Ondes et Images (France); Jean-Michel Benoit, Clementine Symonds, Alban Gassenq, Joël Bellessa, Institut Lumière Matière, Univ. Lyon 1 (France)
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In the weak coupling regime of light-matter interaction, the spontaneous emission of a fluorescent emitter can be tuned by placing it in a nanostructured environment such as plasmonic structures. In the strong coupling regime, the hybridization of the emitters with surface plasmons generates spatially extended coherent states called polaritons. These states span over a coherence length of several microns. We show how fluorescent quantum dots weakly coupled to a surface plasmon interact with J-aggregated organic molecules strongly coupled with a surface plasmon. We study how such interaction changes by tuning the wavelength of the quantum dots along the polariton bands.
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Author(s): Zhaowei Liu, Univ. of California, San Diego (United States)
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Electrically-driven localized surface plasmon (LSP) sources is an important component for future plasmonic devices in various fields like on-chip communication and sensing. One major challenge is to incorporate small footprint, high modulation speed, and high energy efficiency into one practical system. We experimentally demonstrate a resonant inelastic electron tunneling (RIET) based LSP source working at visible and near-infrared frequencies with exceptionally high quantum efficiency. We believe this new LSP source will open up various new opportunities in plasmonic applications.
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Author(s): Álvaro Rodríguez Echarri, ICFO - Institut de Ciències Fotòniques (Spain); Joel Cox, Univ. of Southern Denmark (Denmark), Danish Institute for Advanced Study, Univ. of Southern Denmark (Denmark); Fadil Iyikanat, ICFO - Institut de Ciències Fotòniques (Spain); Javier García de Abajo, ICFO - Institut de Ciències Fotòniques (Spain), ICREA – Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (Spain)
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Recent progress in the fabrication of metallic thin films allows for precise control of the surface crystallographic orientation and thickness, turning them to be a great appeal in plasmonic devices. Considering such a crystalline quality and going towards smaller optical designs; surface, nonlocal, and quantum finite-size effects play a major role in metallic thin films when interacting with light. Here we explore various strategies to seek for the linear and nonlinear optical response manifested in a variety of scenarios and configurations which are based on precise quantum-mechanical formalisms that describe the dynamics of electrons in such films, e.g. EELS, Feibelman d-parameters, periodic- and finite-systems, etc. We believe that our results can inspire future devices based on crystalline metal films as well as motivate further numerical implementation strategies.
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Author(s): Sachinthana Yatamalagala Pathiranage, Malin Premaratne, Monash University (Australia)
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In this study, we rationalize the variations in reflection profiles obtained via FEM simulations for a finite-sized, plasmonic Bragg grating fabricated by periodically modulating the optical conductivity of a 2D graphene sheet using the behavior of the bandgap structure of the polaritonic crystal. First, a periodic Gaussian conductivity profile is etched into the graphene sheet. Then, variation of the band structure due to the dispersion relation of the graphene SPPs against variation of the parameters defining the periodic structure such as grating period, width and height of the Gaussian profile, surrounding dielectric materials and absorption in graphene are compared.
Session 9: Plasmonic Applications II
In person / Livestream: 1 August 2021 • 2:20 PM - 2:50 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 4
Session Chairs: Deep Jariwala, Univ. of Pennsylvania (United States), Masud Mansuripur, Wyant College of Optical Sciences (United States)
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Author(s): Artur Davoyan, UCLA Samueli School of Engineering (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 1 August 2021
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In this talk I will discuss our work on the way light confinement within plasmonic nanostructures leads to new regimes of light manipulation and control. Firstly, I will discuss the way dispersion engineering may lead to new regimes for controlling nonlinear light-material interaction, including phase mismatch-free and broadband operation. I will discuss generation of classical and quantum light in such systems. Secondly, I will highlight our theoretical works on the study of magnetized nanoplasmonic structures. Specifically, as I will demonstrate magnetization combined with the symmetry breaking naturally available in plamonic systems leads to topologically nontrivial regimes of light propagation, which is manifested in one-way propagating and rotating modes. Lastly, I will discuss our experimental work on light absorption within ultrathin film metallic nanostructures and potential applications for optoelectronics.
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Author(s): Taka-aki Yano, Tokushima Univ. (Japan); Takuo Tanaka, RIKEN (Japan), Tokushima Univ. (Japan)
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Tip-enhanced optical microscopy using a metallic probe has been recognized as one of the most promising applications of plasmonics. Here, we present multimodal tip-enhanced vibrational microscopy enabling to perform nanoscale Raman and IR imaging beyond the diffraction limit of light.
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Author(s): Chun-Yu Liu, National Cheng Kung Univ. (Taiwan); Chi-Ching Liu, Research Ctr. for Applied Sciences - Academia Sinica (Taiwan); Wei-Chi Lai, Yung-Chiang Lan, National Cheng Kung Univ. (Taiwan); Yun-Chorng Chang, Research Ctr. for Applied Sciences - Academia Sinica (Taiwan)
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In this study, we demonstrate the ability to exclude the thermal effect and detect the generation of non-thermal hot carriers by surface plasmon using an AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistor. We will also provide a theoretical model to explain the detecting mechanism. This proposed platform is very sensitive, which is at least two orders of magnitude more sensitive compared to the previous reports, can detect the hot carriers generated from discrete nanostructures illuminated by a continuous wave light. The quantitative measurements of hot carrier generation also open a new way to optimize the plasmonic nanoantenna design in many applications.
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Author(s): Jing-wei Yang, National Taiwan Univ. (Taiwan); Chiao Zong-Yi, Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica (Taiwan); Chen Jia-Wern, Lin Chen-Yang, Research Center for Applied Sciences (Taiwan); Hao-Chen Yeh, Department of Physics, National Taiwan University (Taiwan); Peng Tzu-Yu, Research Center for Applied Sciences (Taiwan), Department of Physics (Taiwan); Liang Chi-Te, Department of Physics, National Taiwan Univ. (Taiwan), Graduate Institute of Applied Physics, National Taiwan Univ. (Taiwan); Lu Yu-Jung, Research Center for Applied Sciences (Taiwan), Department of Physics (Taiwan), Graduate Institute of Applied Physics, National Taiwan University (Taiwan)
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We deposited niobium nitride (NbN) thin film by radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering on MgO substrate at 800 ºC (with Tc ~15 K). To increase the photodetectivity, we design an Ag nanocube nanoresonator with a strong gap-plasmon resonance in the visible range to further enhance the photoresponsivity by engineering the optical response for the NbN superconducting devices. This is due to the superconducting states are broken down by a localizing strong electromagnetic field. To design the plasmonic nanostructures, we calculated the electromagnetic field distribution of Ag nanocube/Al2O3/NbN structure by finite-difference time-domain (FDTD). We observed a strong plasmonic resonance field which tightly confined in the Al2O3 layer between the Ag nanocube and NbN film at a resonant wavelength of 532 nm. In the end, we will also discuss the detailed working mechanism and the potential application of plasmon-enhanced photodetection in NbN superconducting photodetectors.
Session 14: Radiation Engineering
In person / Livestream: 1 August 2021 • 2:50 PM - 3:40 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 4
Session Chairs: Artur Davoyan, UCLA Samueli School of Engineering (United States), Valentina Krachmalnicoff, Institut Langevin Ondes et Images (France)
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Author(s): Masud Mansuripur, Wyant College of Optical Sciences (United States); Per K. Jakobsen, UiT The Arctic Univ. of Norway (Norway)
On demand | Presented Live 1 August 2021
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When an electromagnetic plane-wave arrives at the flat interface between its transparent host (i.e., the incidence medium) and an amplifying (or gainy) second medium, the incident beam splits into a reflected wave and a transmitted wave. In general, there is a sign ambiguity in connection with the k-vector of the transmitted beam, which requires at the outset that one decide whether the transmitted beam should grow or decay as it recedes from the interface. We examine this and related problems in a more general setting, where the incident beam is taken to be a finite-duration wave-packet whose footprint in the interfacial plane has a finite width. Cases of reflection from and transmission through a gainy slab of finite-thickness as well as those associated with a semi-infinite gain medium will be considered.
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Author(s): Seth Goldberg, Linda Peteanu, Carnegie Mellon Univ. (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 1 August 2021
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Organic semiconductors are commonly used for the development optoelectronic devices. However, these materials degrade rapidly in the presence of light and oxygen. we expand upon our previously methods of using thin metal films to enhance the stability of a polymer via metal enhanced fluorescence. When overlap of the plasmon peak and peak fluorescence of the polymer is achieved the radiative decay rate increases. The plasmon can be tuned via changing the deposition time and current settings of the sputter coater used for coating. By obtaining fluorescence images of the polymer deposited on the metal film compare to on glass in ambient air, a high degree of stabilization is found via plasmonic interactions. Lifetimes were also obtained of the polymer on glass, an electron transporting layer, and a gold film to compare the changes in lifetime from plasmonic interactions versus charge transfer. The usefulness of plasmonic for organic solar cell materials was probed in this way.
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Author(s): Sangeeta Rout, Samantha R. Koutsares, Devon Courtwright, Norfolk State Univ. (United States); Vanessa Peters, Zhen Qi, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States); Lyudvig S. Petrosyan, Tigran V. Shahbazyan, Jackson State Univ. (United States); Monika M. Biener, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States); Carl E. Bonner, Mikhail A. Noginov, Norfolk State Univ. (United States)
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We have studied the effects of planar, lamellar, and random nanostructured metal-dielectric environments on spontaneous emission and energy transfer concentration quenching of HITC laser dye. We found an inhibition of the concentration quenching in vicinity of metal, which was stronger in nanostructured substrates than in plain geometries. It was shown that the same substrates, which boosted spontaneous emission, also inhibited the concentration quenching. The effect is discussed in terms of the Förster radius affected by losses. Work at LLNL was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344
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Author(s): Humeyra Caglayan, Mohsin Habib, Alireza Rahimi Rashed, Tampere Univ. (Finland)
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In this work, we performed a systematic study on a hybrid plasmonic system to elucidate a new insight into the mechanisms governing the fluorescent enhancement process. We have used hyperbolic meta-antennas to study the emission properties of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs). By introducing a dielectric layer inside the plasmonics antenna we engineer the absorption and scattering spectrum. Our lithographically defined meta-antennas with various diameters act as receiver and transmitter nano-antennas to outcouple efficiently the photoluminescence of the QDs.
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Author(s): Qing Zhang, Peking Univ. (China)
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Exploring exciton-polariton effects in low dimensional semiconductors with large oscillation strength provides solutions to develop low threshold lasers and low-energy consumption, fast photonic interconnections. In this talk, I will introduce our recent results on surface plasmon enhanced exciton-polariton of perovskite nanowires. We find that Rabi splitting energy of MAPbBr3 nanowires is enhanced by 40% by adopting a semiconductor nanwire/dielectric/Ag film sandwich structure. A Rabi splitting energy up to 595 meV is achieved as the dielectric thickness is 5 nm. Later, we demonstrated a room temperature, low-threshold green plasmonic laser in the same configuration.
Session 10: Plasmonic Materials and Nanostructures II
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Author(s): R. Margoth Córdova-Castro, Institut Langevin Ondes et Images (France), Ecole Supérieure de Physique et de Chimie Industrielles de la Ville de Paris (France), CNRS (France); Dirk Jonker, Univ. of Twente (Netherlands); Clément Cabriel, Institut Langevin Ondes et Images (France); Bart van Dam, Yannick De Wilde, Ignacio Izeddin, Institut Langevin Ondes et Images (France), Ecole Supérieure de Physique et de Chimie Industrielles de la Ville de Paris (France), CNRS (France); Arturo Susarrey Arce, Univ. of Twente (Netherlands); Valentina Krachmalnicoff, Institut Langevin Ondes et Images (France), Ecole Supérieure de Physique et de Chimie Industrielles de la Ville de Paris (France), CNRS (France)
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We study the modification of fluorescence emission and decay rate of single fluorescent molecules in the near field of a periodic plasmonic nanostructure formed by a square lattice of Au hollow conical pillars with a periodicity of 250 nm. We perform nanometer-resolved imaging of the LDOS by simultaneously mapping the position and the decay rate of photoactivatable single-molecules with a novel super-resolved microscopy approach which enables multiplexed and super-resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging at the single-molecule level (smFLIM) with a field of view of ~10 µm2. We observe the LDOS modification of such optically rich material at different illumination conditions and we measure a large Purcell factor enhancement which increases for oblique illumination of the nanostructure.
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Author(s): Özge Demirtas, Middle East Technical Univ. (Turkey); Ghazanfar Ali Khan, COMSATS Univ. Islamabad (Pakistan); Nasim Seyedpour Esmaeilzad, Middle East Technical Univ. (Turkey); R. M. Faheem Iftikhar, COMSATS Univ. Islamabad (Pakistan); İ. Murat Öztürk, Middle East Technical Univ. (Turkey); A. Kemal Demir, Bilkent Univ. (Turkey); Waqqar Ahmed, COMSATS Univ. Islamabad (Pakistan); Alpan Bek, Middle East Technical Univ. (Turkey)
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Wide acceptance of SERS as a feasible technique for trace detection strongly depends on cost-per-substrate. SERS substrates which fulfill all the desired requirements of high reproducibility, uniformity, enhancement factor (EF), low limit-of-detection (LoD), and long shelf-life comes at relatively high costs associated with elevated investment costs of complicated instrumentation such as e-beam lithography and deposition chambers. For that reason, solution based synthesis of noble metal micro- and nanoparticles can remedy the associated costs albeit with compromised reproducibility and uniformity. In this talk, I present facile synthesis methods of three different plasmonic noble metal micro-nanoparticle platforms that ensure highly concentrated hotspots and uniform SERS enhancement factors. Multi-spiked gold nanoparticles, silver deposited filter paper substrate and seedless grown gold microparticles are shown to provide LoD of 1 to 10 fM, EF of 1e9, RSD of 6%, and >1 year shelf-life.
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Author(s): Kyoko Namura, Shunya Hanai, Samir Kumar, Motofumi Suzuki, Kyoto Univ. (Japan)
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Plasmonic nanostructures absorb light efficiently at their resonant frequency and convert it to heat within several picoseconds, which is called the “thermoplasmonic effect.” This thermoplasmonic effect is suitable for the generation of a microbubble in water and Marangoni flow around it. Recently, we succeeded in creating micropatterns of the plasmonic nanostructure using the glancing angle deposition technique. The unique pattern enables us to control the direction of the Marangoni flow around the bubble. Besides, those plasmonic nanostructures can act as sensing platforms for such as Raman spectroscopy. Here we present their usefulness in optofluidic devices.
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Author(s): William P. Wardley, Johannes W. Goessling, Martin Lopez Garcia, INL - International Iberian Nanotechnology Lab. (Portugal)
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Diatoms are an abundant group of algae, sharing a unique feature; they produce silica exoskeletons featuring intricate nanostructures, known as a frustule. In certain species this includes a porous network with high precision lattices, strongly resembling photonic crystals produced using modern technological processes. Here we show two means for using these frustules as an optical material. Firstly, the unprocessed frustule can be used as a conventional photonic crystal. Secondly, a metal deposition processing step can yield plasmonic crystals. Both show high quality optical properties, analogous to lab-manufactured structures, and are produced over much larger areas at a much lower cost and without specialist equipment. Optical spectra (angularly resolved dispersions) are presented, along with simulation results to corroborate experimental findings and to allow optical mode characterisation and analysis.
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Author(s): Paulo André Gonçalves, ICFO - Institut de Ciències Fotòniques (Spain); Thomas Christensen, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); Nuno Peres, Univ. do Minho (Portugal); Antti-Pekka Jauho, Technical Univ. of Denmark (Denmark); Itai Epstein, Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel); Frank Koppens, ICFO - Institut de Ciències Fotòniques (Spain); Marin Soljačić, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); N. Asger Mortensen, Univ. of Southern Denmark (Denmark)
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When graphene is placed in the near vicinity of a metal substrate, graphene plasmons are screened by the metal thereby giving rise to acoustic graphene plasmons. These exhibit record-high field confinement, squeezing light down to nanometer dimensions. Hence, plasmons in such heterostructures make ideal candidates to probe the quantum nonlocal electrodynamic response of the nearby metal. We treat graphene at the level of the RPA and describe the nonclassical optical response of the metal using a framework of mesoscopic electrodynamics based on microscopic surface-response functions, known as Feibelman d-parameters, which embody quantum corrections in the metal’s response. We show that the graphene plasmons’ resonances exhibit quantum shifts due to the quantum surface-response of the metal, and show how these spectral shifts can be used to interrogate the quantum surface-response of metals, thus provide a theoretical basis for experimentally inferring the said quantum surface-response.
Session 11: Active Control
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Author(s): Stefan A. Maier, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. München (Germany)
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Session 12: Metasurfaces III
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Author(s): Yang Zhao, Holonyak Micro & Nanotechnology Lab. (United States)
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The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is the main figure of merit that assesses the quality of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Enhancing SNR oftentimes involves enhancing the magnetic field intensities of the constant homogenous magnetic field from the main coil, or the oscillating magnetic field from the radio frequency (RF) coil. Here we show that the SNR of MRI can also be improved by enhancing the coupling between the imaging subject and the receiving coil during the signal reception. We will provide a theoretical design of an ultrathin metasurface with micrometer thickness and high flexibility. Our metasurface can enhance the SNR by up to 28 times in the region of interest; at the same time, it is designed to minimally disturb the excitation fields by less than 1.6%, thus maintaining the uniformity of the excitation, important to achieve a high-quality MR image with minimal artifacts.
Session 13: Nonlinear II
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Author(s): Howard Lee, Sudip Gurung, Univ. of California, Irvine (United States); Khant Minn, Baylor Univ. (United States); Aleksei Anopchenko, Univ. of California, Irvine (United States); Subhajit Bej, Baylor Univ. (United States), Tampere Univ. (Finland)
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This talk will review our recent studies on the nonlinear and emission properties of conducting oxide and metallic nitride epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) materials. I will present a method to engineer the field intensity enhancement of the Al-doped zinc oxide (AZO) ENZ thin films synthesized by atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique. I will then discuss the observation of abnormal nonlinear temporal dynamic of hot electrons and enhanced optical nonlinearity in AZO and ITO ENZ thin films under different pump fluences and excitation angles using a degenerate pump-probe spectroscopy technique. Finally, I will present the first comprehensive study of photoluminescence from a 2D material placed near ENZ films and its dependence on the losses of materials, as well as the spectral response of such emitters with excitation wavelengths across the ENZ regime. This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation (grant number: 1752295) and AFOSR-AOARD (FA2386-18-1-4099)
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Author(s): Yunyun Dai, Zhipei Sun, Aalto Univ. (Finland)
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Here, we will report our recent results on plasmon-enhanced nonlinear optical responses in two-dimensional monolayer materials (with the enhancement factor up to three-order of magnitude with a wide operation bandwidth). Such a significant and wideband enhancement can be well explained by the highly localized field in the plasmonic structures, which is interesting for various nonlinear photonic and optoelectronic applications.
Nanoscience + Engineering Plenary Session
In person / Livestream: 2 August 2021 • 8:25 AM - 11:20 AM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 6A
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Mark Stockman Tribute (Plenary Presentation)
Author(s): Natalia M. Litchinitser, Duke Univ. (United States); Nikolay I. Zheludev, Optoelectronics Research Ctr. (United Kingdom)
On demand | Presented Live 2 August 2021
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Author(s): P. James Schuck, Columbia Univ. (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 2 August 2021
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Author(s): Teri W. Odom, Northwestern Univ. (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 2 August 2021
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This talk will discuss current advances and future prospects in manipulating light at the nanoscale by plasmonic nanoparticle lattices. These meta-materials support collective hybrid resonances with both light scattering and localization properties. First, we will describe the expanded scope of plasmonic lattices based on exquisite tuning of topological symmetries and nanoparticle materials. Next, we will highlight how the nanoscale cavities combined with quantum emitters show unprecedented nano-lasing properties. Finally, we will discuss how this platform is opening new opportunities in imaging, strong coupling, and photoelectrocatalysis.
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Author(s): Warwick P. Bowen, The Univ. of Queensland (Australia)
On demand | Presented Live 2 August 2021
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State-of-the-art microscopes use intense lasers that can severely disturb biological processes, function and viability. This introduces hard limits on performance that only quantum photon correlations can overcome. In this talk I will report recent work from my laboratory which demonstrates this absolute quantum advantage [1]. We show, specifically, that quantum correlations enable signal-to-noise beyond the photodamage-free capacity of conventional microscopy. Broadly, this represents the first demonstration that quantum correlations can allow sensing beyond the limits introduced by optical intrusion upon the measurement process. We achieve this in a coherent Raman microscope, which we use to image molecular bonds within a cell with both quantum-enhanced contrast and sub-wavelength resolution. This allows the observation of nanoscale biological structures that would otherwise not be resolved. Coherent Raman microscopes allow highly selective biomolecular finger-printing in unlabelled specimens, but photodamage is a major roadblock for many applications. By showing that this roadblock can be overcome, our work provides a path towards order-of-magnitude improvements in both sensitivity and imaging speed.
Nanoscience + Engineering Plenary Networking Event
In person: 2 August 2021 • 11:20 AM - 11:50 AM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 6A
Join your colleagues for 30 minutes of networking and discussion after the Nanoscience + Engineering plenary talks.
Session 15: Plasmonic Sensing
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Author(s): Yukina Takahashi, Kyushu Univ. (Japan), Japan Science and Technology Agency (Japan); Takuya Ishida, Sunao Yamada, Kyushu Univ. (Japan)
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We developed two-dimensional arrays of larger plasmonic metal nanoparticles than before by employing bottom up methods and investigated their plasmonic properties for sensing and photoelectrochemical applications. From surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) measurements, we found that the array consisting of gold nanoparticles with the diameter of 50 nm exhibited larger enhancement effects than that of 15 nm.
Session 16: Fundamental of Plasmonics III
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Author(s): David J. Bergman, Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel)
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The theory of eigenstates of Maxwell's equations in a composite medium is extended to composites that have many constituents where every constituent can have arbitrary but uniform values of the dielectric constant, the electric conductivity and the magnetic permeability. Those eigenstates are then used to develop an expansion for the local physical electric field which results either from a given electric current distribution or a given "incident field", which means a field that is produced in the pure "host constituent" that is the only constituent which extends out to infinite distances.
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Author(s): Liang-Yan Hsu, Academia Sinica (Taiwan)
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In this conference, I will briefly introduce the theories of resonance energy transfer and molecular fluorescence coupled to plasmon polaritons from weak to strong light-molecule couplings (i.e., from the Franck-Condon to polariton regime). Based on macroscopic quantum electrodynamics, our theories can model hybrid light-molecule states in dispersive and absorptive (lossy) linear dielectrics. In other words, our theory can estimate the light-molecule coupling and dielectric loss without any free parameters. In addition, the simulations of quantum dynamics of hybrid light-molecule states and the corresponding numerical scheme will be presented. Finally, I will demonstrate how hybrid light-molecule states are influenced by the interplay between the light-molecule coupling and the vibronic coupling.
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Author(s): Shinho Lee, Min-Kyo Seo, KAIST (Korea, Republic of)
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We present a sub-wavelength-scale plasmomechanical system consisting of an Au/hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ) plasmonic nano-resonator and a supporting HSQ nano-wall. The full footprint of the system in three dimensions is only ~0.15 μm^3, which is just ~0.59 times of cubic wavelength. Strong optical scattering and dissipation of plasmonic resonance enable interaction with mechanical motion. We experimentally demonstrate the optical excitation and readout of the fundamental longitudinal mechanical oscillation, of which the real displacement is in the order of pico-meter. The plasmonic resonance with a wide spectral width allows the optical measurement of the mechanical oscillation signal over a large wavelength range (>100 nm) of the probe laser. Our dissipatively coupled plasmomechanical system shows not only tunability of the resonance frequency of mechanical oscillation but also the thermoelastic damping effect on the mechanical quality factor depending on the pump laser power.
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Author(s): Eduardo Martínez Castellano, Julen Tamayo-Arriola, Miguel Montes Bajo, Alejandro Gonzalo, Lazar Stanojević, José María Ulloa, Univ. Politécnica de Madrid (Spain); Oleksii Klymov, Univ. de València (Spain); Jose Yeste Lozano, Instituto de Microelectrónica de Barcelona (Spain); Said Agouam, Univ. de València (Spain); Elías Muñoz, Univ. Politécnica de Madrid (Spain); Vicente Muñoz-Sanjosé, Univ. de València (Spain); Adrián Hierro, Univ. Politécnica de Madrid (Spain)
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In this work we propose the use of self-assembled CdZnO nanoparticles on GaAs as a route to improve power absorption in mid-IR GaAs-based QWIPs. We experimentally demonstrate low temperature growth of CdZnO nanoparticles on GaAs and characterize their plasmonic response in the mid-IR. Computational analysis of the plasmonic resonances coupled to intersubband transitions in GaAs quantum wells show that intersubband absorption at normal incidence, forbidden by quantum selection rules, can be obtained. Gains in the quantum well power absorption as high as 5.5 are also reported.
Session 17: Metasurfaces IV
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Author(s): Anne Nguyen, Léo Wojszvzyk, Anne-Lise Coutrot, Benjamin Vest, Jean-Jacques Greffet, Institut d'Optique Graduate School (France)
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Currently, no cheap, compact sources in the mid-infrared range that can be modulated at high frequencies are available. For this purpose, thermal radiation is often considered irrelevant because of the intrinsic properties of blackbody radiation, being broadband, isotropic, and unpolarized. Moreover, modulation rates of bulky devices is limited to a few hertz by thermal inertia. However, there is no fundamental limit that imposes these properties, that can be strongly modified using appropriate nanostructures. In this presentation, we report the design, fabrication and characterization of infrared incandescent sources, modulated faster than 10MHz with a controlled spectrum and polarization.
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Author(s): Karim Achouri, Olivier J. F. Martin, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (Switzerland)
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An optical metasurface may be modeled using boundary conditions that relate the fields interacting with it to the response of its scattering particles usually expressed in terms of electric and magnetic dipolar responses. Additionally, these boundary conditions also typically account for weak spatial dispersion, such as bianisotropy, to properly model effects like chirality. While such modeling approaches are sufficient for operations in the paraxial limit, they usually fail when larger angles of propagation or electrically large scattering particles are considered. To overcome these limitations, we derive boundary conditions that include dipolar and quadrupolar responses and higher-order spatially dispersive effects and show in which situations they can be useful. Since, this approach requires the introduction of many new effective material parameters in the form of hypersusceptibilities, we also provide an extension to the Lorentz reciprocity and Poynting theorems.
Session 18: Thermal Plasmonics
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Author(s): Loubnan Abou Hamdan, Ecole Supérieure de Physique et de Chimie Industrielles de la Ville de Paris (France), Univ. PSL (France), CNRS (France); Valentina Krachmalnicoff, Ecole Supérieure de Physique et de Chimie Industrielles de la Ville de Paris (France), Univ. PSL (France), CNRS (France); Riad Haïdar, DOTA (France), ONERA (France), Univ. Paris-Saclay (France); Patrick Bouchon, ONERA (France), Univ. Paris-Saclay (France); Yannick De Wilde, Ecole Supérieure de Physique et de Chimie Industrielles de la Ville de Paris (France), Univ. PSL (France), CNRS (France)
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The electromagnetic modes of a sub-wavelength sized antenna can be excited both optically and through thermal fluctuations. When dealing with individual or a small number of nano-antennas, highly sensitive techniques, such as thermal radiation scanning tunneling microscopy, and infrared spatial modulation spectroscopy, are required in order to extract the very weak emitted thermal radiation. Using these techniques, we have been able to characterize the thermal emission of a single pair of sub-λ metal-insulator-metal antennas separated by a nanometric gap. It is found that the various hybrid modes of a single antenna pair can be simultaneously excited by thermal fluctuations, an essentially incoherent process arising from fluctuating thermal currents. The effect of hybrid plasmonic modes on the resonant behavior of the considered antenna system may guide future efforts for realizing tunable optical and thermal structures made up of a small number of antennas, for various applications.
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Author(s): Wakana Kubo, Tokyo Univ. of Agriculture and Technology (Japan)
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Temperature gradient across a thermoelectric device is a keystone to generate electricity based on Seebeck effect. Here, we propose a metamaterial thermoelectric device that is able to generate electricity even under homogeneous temperature environment. Metamaterial perfect absorber fabricated on a thermoelectric device electrode absorbs thermal radiation emitted from the surrounding environment, resulting in a generation of local heating. The local heating propagates to the underneath thermoelectric device through a metal electrode, resulting in an additional thermal gradient across the device. We examined the metamaterial thermoelectric device performance put in a homogeneous temperature environment at 423 K and found that an additional thermal gradient of 0.5 K is added to the bismuth telluride thermoelectric device.
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Author(s): Túlio Pedrosa, Carlos Estupiñan Lopez, Renato E. Araujo, Univ. Federal de Pernambuco (Brazil)
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Highly sensitive thermometric methods are essential in the evaluation of nanoplatforms for thermal applications. In this study, the dual-beam thermal lens technique was introduced to assess the optically induced temperature changes in colloidal samples of gold nanoparticles. Dual-beam measurements were performed on a 0.05 mg/mL gold nanospheres (50 nm diameter) aqueous solution and the localized nanoparticle temperature were determined. The system was able to detect temperature variations as low as 0.01 °C, with 0.2 1/°C sensitivity in the assessment of metallic nanoparticle colloids. Furthermore, thermal lens measurements also allowed the acquisition of the nanoparticle absorption cross-section value, regardless of its scattering properties.
Live Remote Keynote Session: Nanoscience + Engineering Applications I
In person / Livestream: 3 August 2021 • 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 6A
Session Chair: Ganapathi S. Subramania, Sandia National Labs. (United States)
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Author(s): Shanhui Fan, Stanford Univ. (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 3 August 2021
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We show that wavevector-space metasurface can be used to achieve non-trivial correlation between the frequency and the momentum of light. As applications we demonstrate squeezing of free space, generation of meron textures, and creation of the three dimensional light bullets.
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Author(s): Thomas F. Krauss, Univ. of York (United Kingdom)
On demand | Presented Live 3 August 2021
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The challenge for biosensors is to achieve high performance and multiple functionalities at low cost, which includes the source and readout instrumentation. Here, we describe a sensor modality utilizing guided mode resonances that can detect multiple markers for infection, that combines the sensor chip and spectrometer in a single chip and that can achieve a limit of detection as low as 1pg/ml. This performance is equivalent or better than laboratory-based techniques yet the sensor and instrumentation can be made entirely from low-cost components.
Live Remote Keynote Session: Nanoscience + Engineering Applications II
In person / Livestream: 3 August 2021 • 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Room 6A
Session Chair: Giti A. Khodaparast, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ. (United States)
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Spintronics with bacteria (Keynote Presentation)
Author(s): Benjamin Zingsem, Univ. Duisburg-Essen (Germany); Thomas Feggeler, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States); Michael Winklhofer, Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg (Germany); Michael Farle, Univ. Duisburg-Essen (Germany)
On demand | Presented Live 3 August 2021
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Spin wave logic circuits using quantum oscillations of spins (magnons) as carriers of information have been proposed for next generation computing with reduced energy demands and the benefit of easy parallelization. Current realizations of magnonic devices have micrometer sized patterns. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of biogenic nanoparticle chains as the first step to truly nanoscale magnonics at room temperature. Our measurements on magnetosome chains (ca 12 magnetite crystals with 35 nm particle size each), combined with micromagnetic simulations, show that the topology of the magnon bands, namely anisotropy, band deformation, and band gaps are determined by local arrangement and orientation of particles, which in turn depends on the genotype of the bacteria. Our biomagnonic approach offers the exciting prospect of genetically engineering magnonic quantum states in nanoconfined geometries. By connecting mutants of magnetotactic bacteria with different arrangements of magnetite
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Author(s): Masashi Shiraishi, Kyoto Univ. (Japan)
On demand | Presented Live 3 August 2021
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Gate-tunable spin-orbit interaction (SOI) and its related phenomena have been a new aspects of spintronics and spin-orbitronics. In this presentation, recent progress of gate modulation of the inverse spin Hall effect [1,2], its reciprocal effect [3] and spin lifetime anisotropy [3] in solids by a gate electric field will be introduced and discussed. [1] S. Dushenko, M. Shiraishi et al., Nature Commun. 9, 3118 (2018). [2] S. Yoshitake, M. Shiraishi et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 117, 092406 (2020). [3] R. Ohshima, M. Shiraishi et al., submitted. [4] S. Lee, M. Shiraishi et al., submitted.
Poster Session
In person: 3 August 2021 • 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM PDT | Conv. Ctr. Sails Pavilion, City Trellis Entrance
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Author(s): Md Didarul Islam, Sipan Liu, North Carolina State Univ. (United States); John S. Derov, Augustine M. Urbas, Zahyun Ku, Air Force Research Lab. (United States); Darryl A. Boyd, Woohong R. Kim, Jasbinder S. Sanghera, Vinh Q. Nguyen, Jason D. Myers, Colin C. Baker, U.S. Naval Research Lab. (United States); Evan M. Smith, KBR Inc. (United States); Jong E. Ryu, North Carolina State Univ. (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 3 August 2021
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Recently, sulfur-based polymers have been utilized to fabricate mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) polarizers with competitive extinction coefficient to commercial polarizers which are made of expensive, brittle, and heavy inorganic materials. However, a major limitation of these polymers is that to increase the refractive index (RI), the sulfur content needs to be increased, which results in reduced thermomechanical stability of the polymer-based optical devices. In this study, the sulfur-based polymer was reinforced with nanoparticles (NPs) to simultaneously improve the RI and the thermomechanical properties. Then, MWIR wire-grid polarizers were studied based on the reinforced composites by a thermal imprinting method. The NPs reinforced polarizer shows superior structural stability compared to pure polymer. Moreover, the polarizers show a spectral selectivity as the resonance wavelength of the transmission curve depends on the composite's RI, which is tunable by the NPs content.
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Author(s): Aakash Sahai, Univ. of Colorado Denver (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 3 August 2021
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Plasmonics has opened unforeseen applications due to its sub-wavelength control over collective modes of free electron gas enabled by nano-structuring of the underlying media. I introduce my TeraVolts per meter Plasmonics initiative which promises many tens of TV/m fields using nanomaterials which make possible novel relativistic plasmonic modes excited as "trailing wake" of intense particle bunches. Nanofabricated tubes with hollow core are critical to mitigate disruptive effects of collision of the beam with the ionic-lattice. Specifically, I present underlying concepts, analytical and computational model of highly nonlinear surface waves. This surface wave is sustained by a train of "crunch-in" surface plasmons with large-scale electron-ion charge-separation which leads to tens of TV/m fields. The crunch-in surface plasmons are thus strongly electrostatic unlike any other plasmonic modes. Access to unprecedented plasmonic fields has far-reaching potential for transformative impact.
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Author(s): Valdas Šablinskas, Vilnius Univ. (Lithuania); Agne Zdaniauskiene, Ctr. for Physical Sciences and Technology (Lithuania); Sonata Adomaviciutė-Grabusove, Vilnius Univ. (Lithuania); Evaldas Stankevičius, Vita Petrikaite, Tatjana Charkova, Lina Mikoliunaite, Romualdas Trusovas, Algirdas Selskis, Gediminas Niaura, Ctr. for Physical Sciences and Technology (Lithuania)
On demand | Presented Live 3 August 2021
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The goal of this study is development of ultra-sensitive and reproducible SERS platform based on novel magneto-plasmonic nanoparticles produced by laser ablation. The magnetic core ensures manipulation of the nanoparticles by magnetic field by arranging them at biological surfaces in a special geometry resulting in high and reproducible SERS. Parameters of the nanoparticles were controlled by changing laser power, pulse duration, repetition rate as well as chemical composition of the target and the solution. The fabrication of hybrid nanoparticles by laser ablation offers a new possibility for construction of SERS substrates with tunable optical and magnetic properties for biomedical sensing.
11797-100
Author(s): Daniel B. Durham, Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States); Christopher M. Pierce, Cornell Univ. (United States); Fabrizio Riminucci, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (United States); Silvia Rotta Loria, Politecnico di Milano (Italy); Kostas Kanellopulos, TU Wien (Austria); Ivan Bazarov, Jared Maxson, Cornell Univ. (United States); Stefano Cabrini, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (United States); Andrew M. Minor, Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States); Daniele Filippetto, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 3 August 2021
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Pulsed electron beam sources are increasingly in demand, especially as probes for ultrafast science and as patterning tools in lithography applications. Plasmonic nanostructures have been shown to enhance multiphoton photocurrent from metal cathodes by orders of magnitude, but for many applications it is also important to characterize the transverse electron beam properties. Here, we present preliminary work demonstrating a DC photogun setup for characterizing plasmonic photoemitters at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, including measurement of photocurrent and the asymmetric transverse phase space of photoemitted beams from plasmonic nanogroove resonator arrays. This lays the groundwork for future studies of emerging plasmon-enhanced photoemitter designs, such as plasmonic lens nanoemitters.
11797-67
Author(s): Yanfeng Wang, Tsinghua Univ. (China); Harrison B. Chong, The Univ. of Georgia (United States); Zhengjun Zhang, Tsinghua Univ. (China); Yiping Zhao, The Univ. of Georgia (United States)
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A new extraordinary optical transmission mode with tunable resonance wavelength appeared at the near-IR region was predicted numerically and observed experimentally for the complex nanorod in nanohole array structures. The resulted structures showed strong polarization angle-dependent optical properties and can be used for ultrathin optical filters, polarizers, surface-enhanced spectroscopies, etc.
11797-69
Author(s): Carla Estévez-Varela, Sara Núñez-Sánchez, Jorge Pérez-Juste, Isabel Pastoriza-Santos, Univ. de Vigo (Spain)
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Plasmonic materials are well stablished and used in fields like biomedicine or energy harvesting due to their exceptional optical properties. One of the most interesting characteristics of plasmonic nanoparticles is their ability to confine light at the nanoscale. Nevertheless, such behaviour can also be found in some non-metallic materials as in organic-excitonic materials based on J-aggregates. Herein, we evaluate the synthetic route to obtain colloidal dispersions of excitonic core-shell nanoparticles that can mimicking plasmonic behaviour.
11797-70
Author(s): Chih-Ang Lin, Research Ctr. for Applied Sciences - Academia Sinica (Taiwan); Jung-Chan Lee, Yu-Cheng Chu, Li-Chien Chang, National Taiwan Univ. (Taiwan); Yu-Hung Hsieh, Ming-Yen Lu, National Tsing Hua Univ. (Taiwan); Chih Wei Chu, Research Ctr. for Applied Sciences - Academia Sinica (Taiwan); Tzung-Fang Guo, National Cheng Kung Univ. (Taiwan); Yu-Jung Lu, Research Ctr. for Applied Sciences - Academia Sinica (Taiwan)
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Lead halide perovskite materials have been proven to be promising candidates for laser application owing to their extraordinary optical properties. However, the environmental pollution risk of lead-based devices has become a challenge. Thus, searching for non-toxic lead-free perovskite materials is important. In this work, we reported a plasmon-enhanced emission (wavelength at 675 nm) from a lead-free halide perovskite CsSnBr3 nanowire, which was synthesized with a non-toxic solvent at low temperature. We designed a plasmonic nanocavity to enhance the pump-photon absorption rate and photon emission rate to reach the lasing action, the plasmonic nanolaser consists of a nanowire on a sputtered plasmonic hafnium nitride film with a thin Al2O3 capping layer by using atomic-layer-deposition. The potential of lead-free halide perovskite CsSnBr3 nanowire lasing will be discussed.
11797-72
Author(s): Vikas ., Raj Kumar, Sanjeev Soni, CSIR - Central Scientific Instruments Organisation (India), Academy of Scientific & Innovative Research (India)
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Here, the role of the domain size is evaluated towards the spectral variation of the optical properties of GNR by using the finite element method. It is concluded that the peak absorption coefficient increased, while the peak scattering coefficient decreased with an increase in the domain diameter. The plasmonic wavelength of GNR blue-shifted with an increase in the domain diameter. Also, the FWHM of the GNR decreased with an increase in the domain diameter. So, for the evaluation of the optical properties of GNR in a medium using the FEM model, the selection of domain diameter plays a significant role.
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We investigate the control of spatial waveforms of femtosecond surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) by metal-insulator-metal (MIM) nano-cavities using a two-photon excitation microscopy method and numerical calculations. The micrographs reveal systematical deformations of the SPP wavepackets transmitted through the cavity, which causes a spatial peak shift depending on the cavity length. The spatial deformation is caused by spectral modulation due to resonant interaction with the cavity possessing discretized eigenmodes. Furthermore, calculation results indicate the amount of the peak shift given by a cavity with a fixed length is controllable from delay to advances by adjusting the chirp of the excitation light pulse.
11797-78
Author(s): Po-sheng Huang, Amir Hassanfiroozi, Pin Chieh Wu, National Cheng Kung Univ. (Taiwan)
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Anisotropic plasmonic metasurfaces work in the cross-polarization state has found wide applications in wavefront engineering, quantum optics, and imaging systems. However, their low polarization conversion efficiency highly constrains to practical applications. In this work, we experimentally demonstrate an array of single-layer plasmonic metasurface with a linear cross-polarization conversion efficiency reaching ~22.9%, which is comparable to the theoretical limit. The high polarization conversion efficiency arises from the introduction of low-loss toroidal multipolar resonances which used to be designed based on lossy electric and magnetic multipoles.
11797-79
Author(s): Benjamin W. Cerjan, Burak Gerislioglu, Rice Univ. (United States); Sravya Nuguri, James J. Watkins, Univ. of Massachusetts Amherst (United States); Stephan Link, Peter Nordlander, Naomi J. Halas, Rice Univ. (United States); Mark H. Griep, U. S. Army Research Lab. (United States)
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11797-80
Author(s): Kan Yao, Jie Fang, Yuebing Zheng, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
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Coupling quantum emitters to a nanosphere represents a classical type of nanoantennas. The optical properties of such systems strongly depend on the nature of the emitter, the dielectric function of the sphere, and importantly, the critical distance between the emitter and the sphere, usually in the order of some tens of nanometers. In this work, we derived the exact solution to the scattering problem for nanospheres under dipole excitation, and, discovered that directional light emission can be obtained with dielectric nanospheres for both electric and magnetic dipole emitters coupled at atomically small distances.
11797-91
Author(s): Rezida Nabiullina, Anton Starovoytov, ITMO Univ. (Russian Federation); Nikita Toropov, ITMO University (Russian Federation); Igor A. Gladskikh, Antonina I. Dadadzhanova, Irina A. Arefina, ITMO Univ. (Russian Federation)
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Hybrid films formed by cyanine dye covering metal nanoparticles on a sapphire substrate or nanoporous alumina on an aluminum substrate were studied with steady‐state and time-resolved spectroscopy. On-surface reaction caused isomerization of molecules as well as self-assembly into molecular nanoclusters. An excitonic band of molecular clusters had been coupled to plasmonic nanoparticles via tuning the length of molecules and shape of nanoparticles. The dynamic of strong coupling was analyzed depending on environmental conditions. The excitation energy transfer was observed from the oxygen vacancies of alumina to the clusters. Such a unique feature should provide a new approach for the development of new sensors.
Conference Chair
The Hong Kong Polytechnic Univ. (Hong Kong, China)
Conference Chair
RIKEN (Japan)
Conference Chair
Research Ctr. for Applied Sciences - Academia Sinica (Taiwan), National Taiwan Univ. (Taiwan)
Program Committee
Technische Univ. Kaiserslautern (Germany)
Program Committee
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (Switzerland)
Program Committee
California Institute of Technology (United States)
Program Committee
Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel)
Program Committee
Tampere Univ. (Finland)
Program Committee
Hong Kong Univ. of Science and Technology (Hong Kong, China)
Program Committee
Academia Sinica (Taiwan)
Program Committee
Harald W. Giessen
Univ. Stuttgart (Germany)
Program Committee
Rice Univ. (United States)
Program Committee
Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of)
Program Committee
Wakana Kubo
Tokyo Univ. of Agriculture and Technology (Japan)
Program Committee
Laurens K. Kuipers
FOM Institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics (Netherlands)
Program Committee
Mikhail Lapine
The Univ. of Sydney (Australia)
Program Committee
Ai Qun Liu
Nanyang Technological Univ. (Singapore)
Program Committee
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (Switzerland)
Program Committee
Rice Univ. (United States)
Program Committee
Northwestern Univ. (United States)
Program Committee
Jackson State Univ. (United States)
Program Committee
Vladimir M. Shalaev
Purdue Univ. (United States)
Program Committee
Institute for Fusion Studies (United States)
Program Committee
ICFO - Institut de Ciències Fotòniques (Spain)
Program Committee
Osaka Univ. (Japan)
Program Committee
Wuhan Univ. (China)
Program Committee
Harbin Institute of Technology Shenzhen Graduate School (China)
Program Committee
Optoelectronics Research Ctr. (United Kingdom), Nanyang Technological Univ. (Singapore)