OPTIFAB INNOVATORS –

We are seeking technical papers, new commercial technology presentations and posters in the following topics:

2021 Focus Topics:


New Advancements in Foundational Optifab Topics:


INDUSTRY—
Present your product breakthroughs

OptiFab 2021 will also feature commercial presentations from the leading optical companies in the following areas:



Companies will be highlighting their latest developments in these technology areas – this is the best opportunity in 2021 to see presentations on the newest products. Companies interested in presenting their products must submit an abstract and final summary of the commercial presentation by the abstract due date to be considered.;
In progress – view active session
Conference 11889

Optifab 2021

In person: 18 - 21 October 2021 | Highland A
View Session ∨
  • 1: Optical Engineering and Metrology
  • 2: Metrology
  • 3: Coatings and Materials
  • 4: Optical Materials
  • SPIE Optifab Plenary Session
  • Exhibition Opening Ceremony and Coffee Break
  • 5: Freeform Considerations
  • 6: System Assembly Considerations
  • 7: Post-Deadline
  • 8: Laser Processing and Metasurfaces
  • Panel Discussion on Funding and Support to Establish Registered Apprenticeships to Address Critical Workforce Shortages
  • 9: Bound Abrasive and Laser Assisted Fabrication Methods
  • 10: Sub-Aperture Polishing and MSF Smoothing Methods
  • Poster Session
Session 1: Optical Engineering and Metrology
In person: 18 October 2021 • 8:20 AM - 10:00 AM EDT | Highland A
Session Chair: Blair L. Unger, N2 Imaging Systems, LLC (United States)
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Author(s): Thomas Dresel, Karta Khalsa, Michael Turzhitsky, Martin F. Fay, Peter J. de Groot, Zygo Corporation (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 18 October 2021
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Advances in flexible, precision aspheric form measurement using axially scanned interferometry Zygo’s Verifire™ Asphere (VFA) measuring instrument relies on translating the test part along the optical axis of a laser Fizeau interferometer while collecting interference fringes from areas of low slope relative to a spherical reference surface. The data are assembled into a final surface profile using the instrument geometry and scan history. Here we report on the latest advances for this system, including auto-alignment, measurability calculations, automatic focus tracking, distortion and magnification calibration, and a new job-centric user interface. We describe the new system, show measurement examples, and illustrate how the improvements improve the metrology and user experience.
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Author(s): Aurélie Bétourné, Quentin Lorphelin, Marion Oudin, Bertille Ghesquière, Adrien Pallares, PHASICS S.A. (France); Valentin Genuer, PHASICS S.A. (France), PHASICS Corp. (United States); Benoit Wattellier, PHASICS S.A. (France)
On demand | Presented Live 18 October 2021
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The demand for large coated flat and curved optics is growing for applications in automotive (windshields, LIDAR windows) or space (spectrally resolved imaging, FSO Lasercom). Their large size leading to high Transmitted wavefront error (TWE) and their sensitivity to wavelength require new metrology instruments. We propose measuring the TWE of such optics with a quadriwave lateral shearing interferometer (QLSI) based wave front sensor, in a double-pass configuration. We present the instrument ability to measure optics in their full transmission spectral band. We also discuss the best strategy to characterize large TWE optics in dynamic ranges exceeding tens of microns.
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Author(s): Rens Henselmans, Casper van Drunen, Dutch United Instruments (Netherlands)
On demand | Presented Live 18 October 2021
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The NMF600 S non-contact measurement machine for freeform optics by DUI was used to measure a large concave off-axis higher order freeform surface with a polygon outside contour with typical diagonal of 250 mm. The total non-rotationally symmetric freeform departure was 3.5 mm PV, with measurement time between 7 and 23 minutes. Measurement repeatability is well below 5 nm rms on a total form error after 6DOF fitting of 1.53 um rms. The pointspacing of 0.1 mm clearly showed the mid-spatial errors and raster polishing residuals.
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CANCELED: Optical optimization and manufacturing of high-precision PARAS-2 spectrograph camera for exoplanet detection
In person: 18 October 2021 • 9:00 AM - 9:20 AM EDT | Highland A
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Author(s): Jamie L. Ramsey, Peter F. Wachtel, J. David Musgraves, John Deegan, Rochester Precision Optics, LLC (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 18 October 2021
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This presentation will examine the case study of a 3x zoom lens that was optimized to work in the MWIR and the LWIR wavelength region and the challenges that come with working in such a wide waveband.
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Author(s): Simone Fohrmann, Patrik Erichsen, TRIOPTICS GmbH (Germany); Markus Schake, Michael Schulz, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (Germany)
On demand | Presented Live 18 October 2021
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An experimental approach for investigating the influence of the detector’s positioning accuracy on the MTF measurement uncertainty depending on the imaging properties of individual lenses under test is presented. For samples with different optical properties, the MTF is measured at various positions in a 2D grid spanned over image field and focus direction from which the derivatives are calculated. Knowing the overall mechanical uncertainty of the detector, this data can be used to determine local uncertainties of the measured MTF. Hereby, a more precise and application-oriented analysis of the MTF accuracy for a measurement system can be achieved.
Break
Coffee Break 10:20 AM - 10:50 AM
Session 2: Metrology
In person: 18 October 2021 • 10:50 AM - 12:50 PM EDT | Highland A
Session Chair: Peter J. de Groot, Zygo Corporation (United States)
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Author(s): Klaus Freischlad, InterOptics, LLC (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 18 October 2021
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We describe high-precision measurements of the transmitted wavefront error and refractive index homogeneity of glass plates using a low-coherence interferometer in a downward-looking configuration. With the low-coherence illumination there are no spurious interference fringes even for a plane-parallel sample. Unbiased results are obtained by using a combination of four different measurement steps. The measurement performance and repeatability are shown for the low-coherence interferometer OptoFlat with a special fixture incorporating sample holder and return mirror. Its ease of handling and supporting software-based user guidance through the measurement steps greatly facilitate wavefront and homogeneity measurements in the optics shop.
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Author(s): Jeremy M. Grace, Samad Edlou, Joseph Foss, Craig Hodgson, Jean-Philippe Rheault, Jake Rosvold, Kurt Sieber, Sarah Walters, IDEX Health & Science, LLC (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 18 October 2021
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We present a straightforward approach to making sensitive fluorescence measurements using a chopped laser and phase-lock detection scheme. By using high-quality optical filters in the excitation and detection paths, the trade-off between spectral information and ultimate sensitivity is controlled by the choice of filter edge locations and bandwidths. Using this approach, we demonstrate a sensitivity of ~1 pW optical power of detected fluorescence over a bandwidth of ~125 nm centered at 505 nm using a 405 nm diode laser as an excitation source. We present the details of the measurement technique and discuss its value in selection of optical materials for fluorescence-based analytical systems.
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Author(s): Tim Potts, Dark Field Technologies (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 18 October 2021
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The need to detect defects in optical glass during IQC, post cleaning, post coating and final QC has become of paramount importance. Optical glass is very high value-added and must be defect-free. Throughout the industry, legions of inspectors perform manual inspection. Manual inspection adds significant cost, reduces yield and becomes the production bottleneck. In-line 100% automatic defect detection can augment or replace manual inspection and delivers a host of benefits including increased throughput, improved yield, scrap reduction, reduced labor cost and maximum customer satisfaction. Solid-State Laser Reflection (SSLR) technology has been successfully applied to this challenge; defect detection to 1µm has been achieved.
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Author(s): Manuel Mestre, Frank A. DeWitt, XONOX Technology Inc. (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 18 October 2021
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Air turbulence is a major environmental factor that degrades the precision of optical part interferometric metrology. Averaging wavefronts is a classic remedy. However averaging leaves unanswered the following issues: How many wavefronts should be averaged? What is the resulting uncertainty on the parameters of interest (RMS, PTV, Strehl ratio...)? What is the risk to be over tolerance? For addressing those issues, the XONOX X-fringe interferometry software is fitted with an advanced "Average Statistics" function. From a sample of measured wavefronts, the software analyzes the turbulence statistical properties, performs Monte-Carlo simulations that provide surface parameters, confidence intervals, and risk.
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CANCELED: Turbulence mitigation methods in phase-shifting Fizeau interferometry
In person: 18 October 2021 • 12:10 PM - 12:30 PM EDT | Highland A
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Laser interferometry can be negatively affected by external factors, such as vibration and turbulence within the cavity. This turbulence affects the optical path length and can require many averages or careful environmental control to mitigate which negatively impacts measurement time. In this effort we present two different methods for addressing this turbulence and show that the methods produce a 2x improvement on the effect of turbulence on measurements, allowing a 3-4x reduction in number of averages required and a commensurate increase in metrology confidence and throughput. These methods each have different applicability to implementation constraints such as ease of use, cost, and setup time.
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Author(s): Charankumar Godavarthi, Marion Oudin, Alexandre Detruit, Adrien Pallares, Antoine Gascon, PHASICS S.A. (France); Valentin Genuer, PHASICS Corp. (United States); Benoit Wattellier, PHASICS S.A. (France)
On demand | Presented Live 18 October 2021
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Smartphones, AR/VR and ADAS optics are challenging to qualify due to their short focal length, high chief ray angle and numerical aperture. Wave front sensing measures the optical aberration and the associated Zernike coefficients, which are used to understand manufacturing errors. In this paper, we propose to use a quadriwave lateral shearing wave front sensor, which is able to characterize such samples without any intermediate optics. This configuration makes the qualification process comprehensive and fast. We will present examples of commercial and calibrated optics with CRA larger than 35°.
Break
Lunch Break 12:50 PM - 2:00 PM
Session 3: Coatings and Materials
In person: 18 October 2021 • 2:00 PM - 3:20 PM EDT | Highland A
Session Chair: Jay Anzellotti, Semrock, Inc. (United States)
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Author(s): Todd F. Blalock, Optimax Systems, Inc. (United States); Kevin Kearney, Optimax Systems Inc. (United States); Matthew Brophy, Tsion Teklemarim, Peter Kupinski, Optimax Systems, Inc. (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 18 October 2021
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The use of high power continuous wave (CW) lasers in the emerging directed energy (DE) market has put greater emphasis on the quality of optical coatings. These coatings (both high reflectance and anti-reflection) require high damage thresholds for use at irradiances up to and greater than 1 MW/cm2. The challenge in the coating process is to minimize the number of coating defects that can contribute to absorption and eventual coating failure. To aid in the development of coating designs and production techniques for DE related optics, we have constructed a high-irradiance Ytterbium fiber laser based scanning metrology system to detect absorbing defects in DE optical coatings. Defects are detected by their localized thermal heating creating a hot-spot. The goal of this work is to continually improve the coating, increase the laser damage threshold, and create a standard for the testing and validation of directed energy optical coatings.
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Author(s): John B. Barton, Sheetal K. Chanda, Sarah A. Locknar, Gary E. Carver, Omega Optical Holdings, LLC (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 18 October 2021
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Many free space optical systems can be fiberized, enabling advantages in function, size and weight. Implementations include fiber-based lasers, interferometers, polarimeters, spectrometers, endoscopic probes, and pigtailed detectors. Interference filters can be integrated into a fiberized system by depositing the filters on fiber tips. Omega has deposited a variety of interference stacks on fiber tips. One can think of fiber tips as a miniaturized substrate – the ultimate small part configuration. This article reviews optical fibers, types of fiber tips, coating fiber tips, testing the coated tips, performance of the coated tips, and applications of the coated tips.
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Author(s): John-Olof Rönn, Sauli Virtanen, Paula Päivike, Mikko Konttinen, Kalle Niiranen, Mikael Saarniheimo, Sami Sneck, Beneq Oy (Finland)
On demand | Presented Live 18 October 2021
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With more than 40 years of experience in ALD and thin film deposition technology, Beneq has developed a new-generation ALD technology that revolutionizes high volume manufacturing of plasma-enhanced thin films: the spatial ALD. In spatial ALD, the substrate is rotated across successive process zones to achieve ultra-fast and high-precision thin film deposition. In this work, we present the latest results obtained with the novel Beneq C2R spatial ALD system, including the fabrication of SiO2, Ta2O5 and Al2O3 with deposition rates reaching > 1 µm/h on 200 mm wafers. Ultimately, our technology overcomes the challenges of traditional ALD and paves the way for the large volume production of optical components on the most challenging surfaces found in the industry.
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Author(s): Janina Krieg, Ralf Jedamzik, SCHOTT AG (Germany); Tony Hull, The Univ. of New Mexico (United States); Thomas Westerhoff, SCHOTT AG (Germany)
On demand | Presented Live 18 October 2021
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ZERODUR® glass ceramic is a material well established in stability-critical industrial markets. Its homogeneous near-zero thermal expansion can be tailored for specific temperature ranges favorable for applications requiring heightened dimensional stability performance. SCHOTT invested extensively into both comprehensive material characteristic studies, and into a newly dedicated highly capable machining and metrology facility. We will describe the capabilities of SCHOTT focusing on CNC machining and precise characterization of monolithic lightweight mirrors through 4-meter sizes. This is done by precision grinding while, at the same time, minimizing the sub-surface damage. Subsequently, the optical finishers can expect a better starting point for polishing and the utility to the telescope designers becomes evident.
Break
Coffee Break 3:20 PM - 3:50 PM
Session 4: Optical Materials
In person: 18 October 2021 • 3:50 PM - 5:30 PM EDT | Highland A
Session Chair: Daniel Gauch, Schneider Optical Machines, Inc. (United States)
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Author(s): Ralf Jedamzik, Uwe Petzold, Fabian Rupp, SCHOTT AG (Germany)
On demand | Presented Live 18 October 2021
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This presentation takes you on a ride through the history of optical glasses at SCHOTT and the art of glass production then and now. Starting with the early days of the SCHOTT foundation by Otto SCHOTT and ending by looking into current and future market trends, that request special optical positions and more extreme features of optical glasses. SCHOTT is facing such upcoming requirements and offers new glass types and metrology upgrades to ensure the next generation of optical devices. Following trends are noticeable in the market place.
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In person: 18 October 2021 • 4:30 PM - 4:50 PM EDT | Highland A
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Soda-lime-silicate glass produced in a drawn process and sand collected in the Sahara have been investigated in this study. The glasses were weathered in a climate chamber (80°C, 80% relative humidity) for 1, 2 and 8 days, respectively. To determine the influence of the sand on the corrosion behavior of the glass, two samples were weathered in climate chamber with a thin layer of sand covering the glass surfaces (~0.1 – 0.15 g sand per sample), while at the same time another sample; used as the reference set; was weathered without sand. The following investigation included optical and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as well as X-ray diffraction (XRD). Furthermore, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) combined with stepwise sputtering was used to generate element depth profiles and to investigate chemical changes of the glasses.
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Author(s): J. David Musgraves, Arie Beckens, Peter F. Wachtel, John Deegan, Rochester Precision Optics, LLC (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 18 October 2021
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The Research and Development group at Rochester Precision Optics LLC (RPO) is conducting a years-long survey of the optical properties of glasses in the Ge-As-Se family. The goal of this survey is to find compositions in this ternary space that are more appropriately suited to demanding DoD and advanced R&D needs. This talk will focus only on the As-Se binary tie line of the full family but will illustrate glass compositions and measurements never before achieved even in this simple system. In particular, the refractive index of each composition is measured using a minimum deviation system from 850 nm to 14 μm. By parameterizing the fits of these dispersion curves, we achieve a deterministic model for designing custom compositions over this tie line. We also discuss the completely novel As80Se20 glass, who’s properties have not been previously reported in literature.
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Author(s): Arie Beckens, Rochester Precision Optics, LLC (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 18 October 2021
SPIE Optifab Plenary Session
In person: 19 October 2021 • 8:00 AM - 9:45 AM EDT | Highland A
Session Chair: Jessica DeGroote Nelson, Optimax Systems, Inc. (United States)
Join us for the Optifab Plenary Session. See below for included presentations.
Welcome and Opening Remarks 8:00 AM - 8:05 AM
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Author(s): Giuseppe Calafiore, Facebook Reality Labs, Facebook Technologies, LLC (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 19 October 2021
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Blazed and slanted gratings present particularly interesting optical properties in that they can diffract light predominantly into one side of the diffraction plane (m≤0 or m≥0). This is useful in a variety of applications, especially for augmented reality (AR) display combiners, where slanted gratings are commonly used to reduce ghosts and improve efficiency. However, angled gratings are difficult to manufacture in volume. Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) has been explored as a route to mass manufacture AR waveguides with slanted structures. Nonetheless, NIL presents several challenges associated with the process of molding and releasing angled features, which result in a constrained process window and the possibility to imprint grating with low aspect ratio and slant angle. An additional challenge of NIL is the choice of imprinted material, which should have the right mechanical and optical properties and the highest desired refractive index. A technology solution to manufacture diffractive optics in volume with large slant angles (>45°) and a high refractive index is necessary in order to have products such as AR glasses reach the consumer market. In this paper we report a series of breakthroughs that our Optics and Display Research team at Facebook Reality Labs (FRL) has achieved, which allow for replication of gratings with a slant angle up to 60° and an aspect ratio of 10:1 in a material with refractive index of 1.90 (RI). A study of the replication process, optimization of materials and processes will be presented. Pattern fidelity, RI uniformity and repeatability of the grating optical response are tracked as function of imprint number. To the best of our knowledge, these results are the first public demonstration of a scalable process to manufacture AR combiners with highly slanted structures in a material with a refractive index of 1.90.
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Author(s): Daniel Nikolov, Univ. of Rochester (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 19 October 2021
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Freeform optics and metasurfaces are two emerging optical technologies that show promise for addressing the needs of modern consumer devices like augmented and virtual reality (AR/VR) displays and mobile cameras. Recent advances in fabrication and testing have been critical to the success of freeform optics. In parallel, various methods for metasurface fabrication, including electron-beam lithography (EBL), have been researched and well established in the last decade but have been limited to fabrication on flat substrates. Metaform is a new optical component that consists of a metasurface conformed to a freeform substrate. We will explore the advances in nodal aberration theory, freeform design methodology, nanofabrication, and metrology necessary to make metaform optics a reality. To validate the developed processes and highlight the advantages of metaforms, we will examine a compact metaform imager inspired by the needs of AR displays. By leveraging the benefits of both metasurfaces and freeform optics, metaforms can thus be used to navigate critical design tradeoffs between optical performance, system volume, and form factor.
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Author(s): Thomas Battley, AmeriCOM (United States), New York Photonics (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 19 October 2021
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The battlefield requires weapon guidance, threat detection, recognition and optical targeting and imaging systems that operate in hard-to-distinguish threat environments, in all conditions, day or night. Since ultraviolet, visible, and infrared optical systems remain the ultimate solution for many systems requirements, high precision optics are pervasive in the military. Systems in development, such as Directed Energy (DE) Weapons and hypersonic missiles impose new optics manufacturing demands. Affordable U.S. manufactured advanced optics are needed to meet these new requirements, and the development of advanced, cutting edge optics design and manufacturing technology is needed to provide superior systems that will enhance the combat capabilities of the warfighter. The American Center for Optics Manufacturing (AmeriCOM) was established by optics manufacturers essential to the defense industrial base in partnership with the Defense Department. The AmeriCOM mission is a three-pronged national effort: • Develop workforce training programs specifically targeted to support the increasing complexity and growing manufacturing requirements of the nation’s optics and photonics industry. • Develop advanced optics manufacturing technologies, testing equipment, and the specialized materials required to support scalable manufacturing in order to strengthen the defense precision optics industrial base. • Successfully transition the mission-critical optics and photonics technologies developed, to production manufacturing operations — the most important measure of success.
Exhibition Opening Ceremony and Coffee Break
In person: 19 October 2021 • 9:45 AM - 10:30 AM EDT | Exhibition Hall
Join us for the Opening Ceremony as we cut the ribbon to open the Optifab 2021 Exhibition. After the opening ceremony coffee will be served in the Exhibition Hall.
Break
Exhibition Viewing 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM
Break
Lunch Break 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Session 5: Freeform Considerations
In person: 19 October 2021 • 1:00 PM - 2:40 PM EDT | Highland A
Session Chair: Nicholas Bilis, Ohara Corp. (United States)
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Author(s): Scott DeFisher, OptiPro Systems, LLC (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 19 October 2021
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Freeform optics are gaining popularity and the industry is adapting to meet the challenges. Metrology systems must now be able to handle large spherical departures, curvature inflections, vertical or steep datum features, and varying surface texture. The UltraSurf was created to address many of these challenges. It is capable of scanning standard aspheric optical shapes as well as freeform optics and associated datum structures. UltraSurf was designed from the ground up to have flexible software that can enable a user to input these complex freeform surfaces and address the upcoming challenges. Examples of freeform and steep complex surface metrology will be presented along with how the UltraSurf can streamline the process.
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Author(s): Franciscus L. Wolfs, Scott DeFisher, James Ross, Kyle Wood, OptiPro Systems, LLC (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 19 October 2021
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Freeform optical systems are becoming more prevalent as more designers begin to understand their benefits. These freeform shapes also can present new challenges in manufacturing that are not present in rotationally symmetric optics. The complexity of the shape and tightening surface form tolerances result in the need for new manufacturing techniques. Specific areas with new challenges include datum structure choices, fixture designs, and metrology data handling. This paper will present the challenges of manufacturing freeform optics and the best practices for design, manufacturing, and measurement to ensure success.
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Author(s): George M. Williams, NanoVox, LLC (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 19 October 2021
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An additive manufacturing platform, including nanocomposite materials and 3D printing, is presented that allows 3D-freeform gradient index (GRIN) functions to be fabricated within planar or surfaced lens elements. The degrees of design freedom allow for realization of complex optical functions that reduce optical system size and weight.
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Author(s): Franciscus L. Wolfs, James Ross, Kyle Wood, Joshua Hamel, Patrick Saresky, OptiPro Systems, LLC (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 19 October 2021
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Freeform optics are becoming prevalent in the optics industry as designers recognize their ability to expand system capability while reducing the number of optics required and its package size. While the same machine can be used for manufacturing rotationally symmetric and freeform optics, new software capabilities need to be created for these complex geometries. Traditional computer aided manufacturing (CAM) software has similar workflow to what is required, but often lacks critical features required for optics, including metrology driven form error corrections. To fill this gap, OptiPro has developed PROSurf, a CAM package designed specifically with manufacturing freeform optics in mind.
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Author(s): Jessica DeGroote Nelson, Optimax Systems, Inc. (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 19 October 2021
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CANCELED: Improvements in deterministic robotic polishing of freeform surfaces with the use of force control
In person: 19 October 2021 • 2:40 PM - 3:00 PM EDT | Highland A
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The use of force control was investigated as a means to improve accuracy and performance of a robotic polishing platform when used to polish freeforms. Incorporating a force senor on the end of a robotic arm showed accuracy improvements for material removal, as well as helped troubleshoot issues with the performance of polishing paths. Advantages of employing polishing paths while using force control and results of polishing similar optics with and without force control coupled with different toolpath generation options will be presented.
Break
Coffee Break 3:00 PM - 3:30 PM
Session 6: System Assembly Considerations
In person: 19 October 2021 • 3:30 PM - 5:30 PM EDT | Highland A
Session Chair: Erik Stover, TRIOPTICS USA (United States)
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Author(s): Robert E. Parks, Optical Perspectives Group, LLC (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 19 October 2021
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Traditionally a rotary table is used for optical centering because the table creates an axis as a reference. We showed, previously, that a Bessel beam also creates an axis useful for centering. The Bessel beam axis and a center of curvature of a surface makes it possible to center an optic simultaneously in tilt and decenter. Now we show that simultaneously sampling two arbitrary points along the Bessel beam also permits full adjustment of tilt and decenter of a powered optic. This makes centering possible without either a rotary table or a precision linear stage.
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Author(s): Morris I. Kaufman, Nevada National Security Site (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 19 October 2021
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This work builds on prior work that developed a methodology for evaluating thermal stress in cemented doublets. The prior studies were limited by a paucity of actual test data, particularly from thermally tested cemented doublets. This follow-on study uses the existing methodology to estimate stresses in cemented doublets that have been tested for a temperature range from –40°C to 85°C in order to establish safe stress levels using actual data. We also discuss limitations and concerns that we need to address in order to improve our understanding of cemented doublet failure.
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Author(s): Patrik Langehanenberg, Christian Wilde, TRIOPTICS GmbH (Germany)
On demand | Presented Live 19 October 2021
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The 5D-alignment of multi-element assemblies within a single barrel by adhesive bonding represents a powerful alternative to the so-called “poker-chip assembly” where the barrel is populated with sub-cells. This way, the single element’s lateral and axial position can be precisely controlled. The described process allows for production of mounted lenses with an outstanding alignment precision below 1 µm in all dimensions in less than 3 minutes per lens element. The fully automated process greatly simplifies the transfer of existing, conventional optomechanical designs to higher performance and allows for smaller and lighter barrel designs compared to the established poker chip assembly.
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Author(s): Christian Buss, TRIOPTICS GmbH (Germany)
On demand | Presented Live 19 October 2021
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Alignment turning is an efficient process to streamline the production of mounted objective lenses. By machining the mount with respect to the optical axis, the objective lens can be assembled to high precision without further adjustment. High precision objective lenses can be built by drop-in assembly. But even four decades since inception, there are challenging applications. Aspheric lenses, large lenses and single micron tolerances require suitable pre- and post-processes to use this technology efficiently in mid- and large-scale production. This paper presents different manufacturing processes tailored for microscope and semiconductor markets. Challenges in the opto-mechanical design are analyzed and modern solutions are presented.
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Author(s): Mitchell J. Sedore, OptiPro Systems (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 19 October 2021
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With labor shortages and difficulty in getting experienced technicians, automation can increase production and efficiency with less labor required. A robot can perform the repetitive tasks that can lead to worker burnout and free technicians up to perform more demanding tasks. Additionally, automation can reduce time between parts and run lights out, leading to increased machine time up, part quantity generated, and profitability. This presentation will showcase OptiPro’s Pro-loader, an “off the shelf” automation solution as well as custom automation solution.
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Author(s): Frank A. DeWitt, Peter Flug, XONOX Technology Inc. (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 19 October 2021
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Quality Control requires the measurement of all dimensions and specifications for which a supplier is contractually bound to deliver but QC does not add intrinsic value to the parts that are to be inspected. Therefore, streamlining QC activities provides important savings by reducing overhead costs. XONOX has developed an integrated system that allows lens manufacturers and lens consumers to efficiently check all aspects of traditional lens elements. Through the use of innovative job planning and reporting software, devices designed for efficient series inspection, and a process that ensures traceability and consistency, XONOX IQC provides a turn-key solution that meets demanding production, inspection and regulatory requirements.
Session 7: Post-Deadline
In person: 20 October 2021 • 8:40 AM - 10:20 AM EDT | Highland A
Session Chair: Blair L. Unger, N2 Imaging Systems, LLC (United States)
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Author(s): Christopher A. Hall, Johnathan M. Davis, QED Technologies, Inc. (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 20 October 2021
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Modern optical fabrication techniques have grown progressively more complex to meet the demands of system designs incorporating non-rotationally symmetric surfaces. Correspondingly, the metrology needed to support the fabrication of such components has become increasingly complex. Manufacturing a non-rotationally symmetric surface is a multi-step process and often each step will have unique metrology requirements. These requirements are often differentiated by the resolution of the various test setups. Additionally, the optical specifications of such surfaces often span various spatial frequencies. This paper will compare the various metrology techniques employed at QED Optics and how they support both manufacturing and final certification.
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Author(s): Juan Manuel Trujillo-Sevilla, Oscar Casanova-Gonzáleza, Miriam Velasco-Ocaña, Sabato Ceruso, Ricardo Oliva-García, Óscar Gómez-Cárdenes, Javier Martín-Hernández, Alex Roqué-Velasco, Alvaro Perez, José Manuel Rodríguez-Ramos, Jan O. Gaudestad, Wooptix SL (Spain)
On demand | Presented Live 20 October 2021
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Wave Front Phase Imaging (WFPI) was used to measure the stria on an artificial plate made of N-BK7 glass material by accurately measuring the Optical Path Difference (OPD) map. WFPI is a new technique capable of reconstructing an accurate high resolution wave front phase map by capturing two intensity images at different propagation distances. An incoherent light source (LED) is collimated and transmitted through the sample. The resultant light beam carries the wave front information regarding the refraction index changes inside the sample. Using this information, WFPI solves the Transport intensity equation (TIE) to obtain the wave front phase map. Topography of reflective surfaces can also be studied with a different arrangement where the collimated light beam is reflected and carrying the wave front phase which is proportional to the surface topography.
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Author(s): Xavier Levecq, Pauline Treimany, Imagine Optic SA (France); Philippe Clémenceau, Axiom Optics (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 20 October 2021
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We will present a new approach of linearized focal plane technique (LIFT), formerly developed by ONERA, which results in an improvement of a factor of 16 (4x4) of the spatial resolution. This technology is based on the combination of standard SH technology with phase retrieval algorithms applied on all spots of the microlens array that provides information on high spatial frequencies. We will show some measurements performed on extremely complex wavefronts. This technology presents very promising perspectives for optical and freeform metrology and can advantageously replace, at lower cost and better usability, Fizeau interferometry : insensitivity to vibrations, multi-wavelengths compatibility, lambda/100 accuracy and a wide dynamic range are, in fact, intrinsic characteristics of this technology.
11889-78
Author(s): Robert A. Smythe, Apre Instruments (United States); Thomas Stalcup, Allen Hinojosa, Apre Instruments Inc. (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 20 October 2021
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Spectrally Controlled Interferometry (SCI) measures surface form and radius in one measurement. Earlier simple proof-of-concept test results demonstrated ~30 PPM radius measurement uncertainty, which rivals the standard DMI radius measurement, and this without any compensation for the ambient environment. These encouraging results demonstrate that SCI measurement of radius in a QC lab could achieve ~5 PPM, a 4X improvement over the DMI measurement. The greatest advantages of SCI might be the combination of accurate results, ease-of-use, and 4X faster measurements with lower skilled operators. Results showing improved measurement uncertainty through better calibration including environmental compensation are presented.
11889-79
Author(s): Gernot Weber, SCHOTT North America Inc. (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 20 October 2021
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The demand for chalcogenide material is steadily increasing. Optical designers are seeing the advantages of the material in their optical designs. On the other side, lens manufacturers have to process this “new” material and often have trouble because chalcogenide glass behaves differently than traditional IR materials like Ge or ZnS. The talk will give you an overview on the improvements on chalcogenide production in terms of internal quality, measurements processes and production technologies.
Break
Coffee Break 10:20 AM - 10:50 AM
Session 8: Laser Processing and Metasurfaces
In person: 20 October 2021 • 10:50 AM - 12:10 PM EDT | Highland A
Session Chair: John P. Deegan, Rochester Precision Optics, LLC (United States)
11889-35
Author(s): Qiang Fu, Hadi Amata, King Abdullah Univ. of Science and Technology (Saudi Arabia); Benjamin Gerard, Univ. of California, Santa Cruz (United States); Christian Marois, NRC-Herzberg Astronomy & Astrophysics (Canada), Univ. of Victoria (Canada); Wolfgang Heidrich, King Abdullah Univ. of Science and Technology (Saudi Arabia)
On demand | Presented Live 20 October 2021
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Spatially-varying features with uniform depths in large areas are challenging to achieve with etching based lithography. Here we propose an additive lithographic fabrication process to realize simultaneous presence of micrometer and millimeter features with low surface roughness. The etching step is replaced by sputter deposition and bi-layer lift-off to form the microstructures. Instead of removing materials, our method grows materials onto the substrate. We demonstrate its effectiveness with a reflective Tilt-Gaussian-Vortex mask with aluminum deposited on a fused silica substrate. The center has a diameter of 130 microns with minimum spacing of 2 microns, and the background pattern is 3 mm by 3 mm, with the largest flat region spanning 1.5 mm. A preliminary 4-level prototype has been tested in the Gemini Planet Imaging calibration unit upgrading project, and an improved 16-level sample has been measured. The results show uniform depth and surface roughness control in the whole area.
11889-36
Author(s): Pierre Delullier, Guillaume Druart, Florence de la Barrière, ONERA (France); Laurent Calvez, Institut des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes (France); Matthieu Lancry, Institut de Chimie Moléculaire et des Matériaux d’Orsay (France)
On demand | Presented Live 20 October 2021
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This work presented takes advantage of recent techniques in femtosecond laser direct writing to imprint optical systems. Four materials were studied to choose the most suitable for the fabrication of a gradient index Fresnel lens. We showed that reaching a phase variation of 2π radians with femtosecond laser writing is possible even for a huge scanning speed (0,01 mm/s up to 25 mm/s) demonstrating the possibility to write quickly a GRIN Fresnel lens with a diameter of some millimetres.
11889-37
Author(s): Peter F. Wachtel, J. David Musgraves, John Deegan, Rochester Precision Optics, LLC (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 20 October 2021
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This effort evaluates laser processing for one of the more simplistic laser functionalities, utilizing the absorption of the laser for surface heating, and relying on the surface tension of the material as a function of temperature to leave a polished surface. The laser polishing is investigated across different materials: oxide optical glass, non-oxide chalcogenide optical glass, and optical polymer. A continuous wave visible wavelength laser is used for the chalcogenide glass, while a pulsed 10.6µm laser is used for the oxide glass and the optical polymer. The laser polishing results are compared to a hot forced-air local surface heating technique and traditional polishing methods.
11889-38
Author(s): Nicolae A. Enaki, Tatiana Paslari, Elena Starodub, Marina Turcan, Sergiu Bazgan, Institutul de Fizica Aplicata (Moldova)
In person: 20 October 2021 • 11:50 AM - 12:10 PM EDT | Highland A
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A new method for repackaging optical metamaterials formed from fiber or spherical elements of various diameters is proposed for ultraviolet C (UVC) decontamination of infected liquids that flow between these elements. It is proposed the method of repacking of metamaterial formed from closed packing big fibers/spheres with other subsystems of thin fibers/bubbles replaced in the free space between the first packing fibers/spheres. This method of the repacking of quasi-periodic meta-materials gives us the possibility to increase the total contact surface of the quarts spheres/fibers with contaminated fluids (water, aerosols). The repacking procedure may be continued by introducing other subsystems of small spheres or thin fibers in the repacked material. This method of repacking opens the attractive possibilities for their use both in decontamination fluids and in the manipulating of pathogens. The new equipment works on the above principle that using UVC sources for decontamination of pa
Break
Lunch/Exhibition Break 12:10 PM - 3:30 PM
Panel Discussion on Funding and Support to Establish Registered Apprenticeships to Address Critical Workforce Shortages
In person: 20 October 2021 • 3:30 PM - 4:30 PM EDT | Exhibit Hall
Moderator:
Dr. Alexis Vogt, Monroe Community College (USA)

Panelists:
Ashley Hoffman, Apprentice Graduate, JML Optical (USA)
Ross Micali, National Work-based Learning Coordinator, Monroe Community College (USA)
Jim VanKouwenberg, Former Workforce Development Coordinator, Optimax (USA)
Kirk Warden, President, LaCroix Precision Optics (USA)
Ben Zeller, Apprentice Graduate, Optimax (USA)

Starting an optics apprenticeship has never been easier. This panel discussion brings together voices from industry and recent hires into the optics workforce who entered through the apprenticeship path. Moderated by Dr. Alexis Vogt (Monroe Community College), the discussion will address the funding and resources available to start an apprenticeship program at your company and will detail how apprentices can solve your critical workforce shortage.
Session 9: Bound Abrasive and Laser Assisted Fabrication Methods
In person: 21 October 2021 • 8:00 AM - 10:00 AM EDT | Highland A
Session Chair: Michael Rinkus, OptiPro Systems (United States)
11889-39
Author(s): Christian Jentgens, Helge Willers, Michael Max, William Gemmill, Terry Knight, Ravi Bollina, Pureon Inc. (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 21 October 2021
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We investigate the use of an innovative fixed abrasive diamond fine grinding pad, Squadro-G, for the fine grinding of various glass types. Through continuous development of the diamond abrasive matrix, grain size and concentration, we have found significant pathways to improve the process performance of the fine grinding operation. For the various glass types used in the investigation the process performance was monitored based on material removal rates, surface quality, run-to-run consistency, and Squadro-G pad lifetime. Data shows the use of Squadro-G fixed abrasive grinding pads can enable efficient processing of various types of glass and tool configurations. Ultimate flexibility is gained via the availability of different grit sizes, dedicated pad configurations with respect to given glass types, and easy mounting and demounting.
11889-40
Author(s): Hossein Shahinian, Charan Bodlapati, Robert Turnbull, Jayesh A. Navare, Yuxiang Zhong, Micro-LAM, Inc. (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 21 October 2021
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In this article exploratory research work on ultraprecision diamond machining of aspherical fused silica glass is done. The part has a diameter of 42 mm with clear aperture (CA) of 32 mm. The part is a convex asphere with a departure from best fit sphere of 46.8 microns. The best fit radius is 51.01 mm. The SPDT of the part was done using the Micro-LAM process, whereby emission of a laser beam with a wavelength of 1064 nm is used as an assistive element to the process. In the paper it is shown that using certain cutting parameters, water-based coolant, and tool geometry with high negative rake angles, surfaces with roughness values below 200 nm RMS across the clear aperture and surface irregularity of better than 700 nm is possible to achieve.
11889-41
Author(s): Jayesh A. Navare, Charan Bodlapati, Robert Turnbull, Yuxiang Zhong, Hossein Shahinian, Micro-LAM, Inc. (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 21 October 2021
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This paper investigates the impact of diamond crystal type on single point diamond turning of single crystal silicon oriented at the <111> direction. The sample has a diameter of 85 mm with a concave base radius of curvature of 291 mm. The tools are made of single crystal diamond formed naturally (hereby referred to as natural diamond) and under lab controlled high-pressure high-temperature conditions (hereby referred to as synthetic diamond). The tools have similar geometries of 0.5 mm nose radius, -25° rake angle. The natural diamond is oriented such that the top face of the diamond stone is a {100} plane and the cutting occur in the <110> direction relative to the stone. The synthetic diamond stone is oriented in the {100} plane with the cutting happening in the <100> direction. It is seen that, on average, the synthetic tool can cut approximately 38.5% longer distances without inducing significant brittle fracture on the surface.
11889-42
Author(s): Jeff Roblee, Cindy Ding, AMETEK Precitech, Inc. (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 21 October 2021
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We report on the latest developments in fast tool servo technology for cutting freeform surfaces and lenslet arrays. Fast tool servo cutting performance is examined and contrasted to micro-milling and XZC turning for low spatial frequency surfaces and high spatial frequency surfaces (e.g. lens arrays). The influences of servo bandwidth, positioning resolution, and vibration level are examined in terms of their effect on form accuracy, mid-spatial frequency errors, surface finish and cutting time.
11889-43
Author(s): Frank Niehaus, Stephan Huttenhuis, Schneider GmbH & Co. KG (Germany); Daniel Gauch, Schneider Optical Machines Inc. (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 21 October 2021
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There is an ever-increasing demand for small optical systems, applications such as cell phone camera lenses, Infrared night vision sensors, and medical devices continue to grow. For these applications, a new compact ultra-precision diamond turning machine offering the highest precision for making both lenses and mold inserts has been developed. A small footprint ideally suited for limited lab space combined with the ability to add a Fast Tool system, optical metrology and automated loading and unloading makes for a versatile yet highly capable machine for precise freeform manufacturing. Unique hardware and software designs yield the highest accuracy on the market.
11889-44
Author(s): Michael J. Cahill, Mike Bechtold, Rob Bechtold, OptiPro Systems, LLC (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 21 October 2021
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Glass or hard ceramic optical materials with complex geometries and difficult to machine features can present significant challenges in manufacturing. To aid in processing these materials, OptiPro has developed OptiSonic, an ultrasonic assisted machining center, which automatically adjusts the active tool frequency to maintain optimal performance while in contact with the part. When combined with rotating tool center point (RTCP) and kinematics, a full 5-Axis simultaneous motion for machining complex geometries in difficult to machine components. Thru rigorous testing, OptiSonic has proven to reduce forces and increase tool life, while decreasing machining time and costs.
Break
Coffee Break 10:00 AM - 10:30 AM
Session 10: Sub-Aperture Polishing and MSF Smoothing Methods
In person: 21 October 2021 • 10:30 AM - 11:50 AM EDT | Highland A
Session Chair: Matthias Pfaff, OptoTech Optikmaschinen GmbH (Germany)
11889-45
Author(s): Christopher M. Supranowitz, Andrew Jones, QED Technologies, Inc. (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 21 October 2021
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As freeform optics become more prevalent, it is important for manufacturers to have flexibility when fabricating such optics. Traditionally, QED's Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF™) machines have used a raster toolpath to polish optics that lack rotational symmetry. However, a spiral toolpath may be desirable for a variety of reasons. We present a new spiral toolpath polishing capability for surfaces that have circular apertures but have a surface form that lacks rotational symmetry. This enables rotationally polishing freeform optics, such as OAPs and toroids, in addition to tilted plano surfaces or wedged (non-centered) spheres.
11889-47
Author(s): Johnathan M. Davis, Christopher M. Supranowitz, QED Technologies, Inc. (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 21 October 2021
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Spot taking is a removal function characterization process, routine in MRF polishing, that generally requires an interferometer. However, interferometers are often in high demand during optical fabrication, have limited slope capture range, and aren’t always ideal for the “shop floor” environment. QED has developed a method that accurately characterizes spots, freeing up the interferometer for applications where it can bring the greatest value. Spots characterized with the new method are shown to provide excellent polishing convergence and are highly consistent with interferometric data. In conclusion, the new method is ideal for conveniently and cost-effectively measuring spots on the shop floor.
11889-48
Author(s): Jennifer Coniglio, Nick Quattrociocchi, Matthew Eisner, Starbuck Beagley, Joshua Beck, Daniel R. Brooks, Brittany D. Cox, Jamie Perdue, Jessica DeGroote Nelson, Optimax Systems, Inc. (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 21 October 2021
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Sub-aperture polishing of freeform optics results in mid-spatial frequency (MSF) errors that must be minimized for image quality. Tradition reduction approaches can require costly artisan hand smoothing. HERMES (High End Robotic Mid-Spatial Elimination System) is a robotic, algorithm-based platform designed to smooth freeform optics using deflectometry input. Preliminary results suggest HERMES reduces MSF errors. Two fused silica parts will be polished with robotic control (subaperture) to compare HERMES on one, and hand smoothing on the other. Outcomes (duration, MSF error reduction, form) will be compared.
11889-49
Author(s): William Messner, Christopher A. Hall, QED Technologies, Inc. (United States)
On demand | Presented Live 21 October 2021
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Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF) is a well-established process for precision optical finishing. The primary benefits of MRF are its determinism, ability to finish complex surface shapes and good removal rate. Higher removal rates can be desirable to reduce cycle times or increase the amount of material removal. Novel developments have been made with the fluid nozzle, magnetic field, and wheel geometry to increase the removal rate. Results show an order of magnitude increase in volumetric removal rate due to a much wider and longer removal function. This development allows MRF to be used in applications previously limited by cycle time.
Poster Session
11889-52 | On Demand Poster
Sub-assembly fabrication of diamond-turned aluminum image slicers
Author(s): Tristan Chabot, Denis Brousseau, Hugues Auger, Simon Thibault, Ctr. d'optique, photonique et laser, Univ. Laval (Canada)

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ABSTRACT:
We present unique optomechanical designs allowing precise fabrication and alignment of diamond-turned aluminum image slicers through preformed monolithic blocks and, most importantly, sub-group assemblies. This last approach reduces manufacturing time and risks while resulting in more alignment flexibility when compared to the traditional monolithic slicer build. We describe all optomechanical parts included in the process, as well as the selection of tooling and machining parameters to obtain good surface quality results on the first groups of slices for the GIRMOS (Gemini InfraRed Multi-Object Spectrograph) instrument image slicer.
Conference Chair
Optimax Systems, Inc. (United States)
Conference Chair
N2 Imaging Systems, LLC (United States)
Program Committee
Jay Anzellotti
Idex Life Science Optics (United States)
Program Committee
New York Photonics Industry Association (United States)
Program Committee
Danielle Bechtold
OptiPro Systems, LLC (United States)
Program Committee
Nicholas Bilis
Ohara Corp. (United States)
Program Committee
Harris Corp. (United States)
Program Committee
Optimax Systems, Inc. (United States)
Program Committee
ASE Sailing Inc. (United States)
Program Committee
Johnathan Davis
QED Technologies, Inc. (United States)
Program Committee
Rochester Precision Optics, LLC (United States)
Program Committee
Zygo Corporation (United States)
Program Committee
Schneider Optical Machines Inc. (United States)
Program Committee
Paul Harmon
Vadient Optics LLC (United States)
Program Committee
OptoTech Optical Machinery Inc. (United States)
Program Committee
Todd Jaeger
Coherent, Inc. (United States)
Program Committee
JENOPTIK Optical Systems, LLC (United States)
Program Committee
Justin J. Mahanna
Universal Photonics Inc. (United States)
Program Committee
Lumetrics, Inc. (United States)
Program Committee
Metrology Concepts LLC (United States)
Program Committee
OptoTech Optikmaschinen GmbH (Germany)
Program Committee
Steve Sokach
SCHOTT North America, Inc. (United States)
Program Committee
TRIOPTICS USA (United States)
Program Committee
Kirk J. Warden
LaCroix Precision Optics (United States)
Additional Information

POST-DEADLINE ABSTRACT SUBMISSIONS

  • Submissions accepted through 30-August
  • Notification of acceptance by 15-September
View Call for Papers PDF