Free Registration
Online Only, France
6 - 10 April 2020
Professional Development Events
Networking for Researchers
Date: Sunday 29 March 2020
Time: 1:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Open to those with a paid registration badge.
No advance registration is required. However, seating is limited and will be granted on a first-come, first-served basis.


A success factor for any career, networking can be daunting for shyer people. Still, both the introverted and the extraverted can benefit from a more systematic approach to professional networking. This workshop explores the very concept of a network, then discusses approaches to effective networking, both face to face and online, each time offering concrete, readily applicable tips.

Learning Outcomes
This workshop will enable you to:
• understand the many facets of networking
• approach people and start conversations respectfully
• make the most of networking opportunities at conferences

Intended Audience
This workshop is intended for anyone who wishes to start networking more systematically or to become better at it.

Instructor

Jean-luc Doumont runs lectures and workshops in research communication, critical thinking, and related topics for engineers, scientists, and other rational minds. He is an engineer from the University of Louvain and a doctor in applied physics from Stanford University. Articulate, entertaining, and thought-provoking, he is a popular invited speaker at top-notch universities and research centers worldwide.
Structuring and Delivering Research Talks
Date: Monday 30 March 2020
Time: 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Open to those with a paid registration badge.
No advance registration is required. However, seating is limited and will be granted on a first-come, first-served basis.


Oral presentations are about having something to say and being able to say it—instead of just “explaining slides” to the audience. This workshop offers a no-nonsense approach to structuring and delivering research talks. It also offers tips on how to manage the nervousness associated with speaking in public. Creating Effective Presentation Slides is the companion workshop held in the afternoon.

Learning Outcomes
This workshop will enable you to:
• understand the basic principles of effective communication
• organize your research story into a meaningful sequence
• deliver your presentation effectively, both verbally and nonverbally

Intended Audience
This workshop is intended for anyone who must prepare and deliver research presentations. Both novice and experienced speakers can expect to gain a lot from it.

Instructor

Jean-luc Doumont runs lectures and workshops in research communication, critical thinking, and related topics for engineers, scientists, and other rational minds. He is an engineer from the University of Louvain and a doctor in applied physics from Stanford University. Articulate, entertaining, and thought-provoking, he is a popular invited speaker at top-notch universities and research centers worldwide.
Essential Skills for a Career in Industry
Date: Monday 30 March 2020
Time: 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Open to those with a paid registration badge.
No advance registration is required. However, seating is limited and will be granted on a first-come, first-served basis.


Working in industry is very different than academia. An advanced degree in science and engineering gives you many technical skills that are valuable in the private sector, but there are a lot of important aspects of working in a company that aren’t taught in school. This workshop gives you the industry primer you need.

The workshop will start with an overview of the five most important ways that working in industry is different than the academic research environment STEM graduate students are trained in. Next, we will cover five habits that scientists and engineers who are successful in industry learn quickly. We will also cover some basics of company finance, how projects are managed in industry, and some tricks for keeping your projects on schedule.

Learning Outcomes
After completing this workshop, attendees will be able to
• describe five ways that technical work in industry is different than academic research
• list the five habits that scientists and engineers who are successful in industry learn quickly
• explain a corporate financial statement and point out where engineering/R&D fits into the profit model
• describe why making decisions quickly is so important in industry, and explain a new technique for making a decision when the 'right' answer is not clear
• list the key elements of a typical industry development project, and describe tactics for keeping it on schedule

Intended Audience
This workshop is intended for graduate students in science and engineering programs who are looking to pursue careers in industry. Scientists and engineers who are already working in industry and want to accelerate their career progress will also find this workshop very helpful.

Instructor

David M. Giltner is the author of the book Turning Science into Things People Need, and is an internationally recognized speaker and mentor for early career scientists and engineers seeking careers in industry. He has spent the last 20 years commercializing photonics technologies in a variety of roles for several companies including JDS Uniphase and Ball Aerospace. Through his time in the private sector, David learned how to function well in both highly technical and business circles, and has often functioned as an interpreter to help these two words communicate more productively. David has a BS and PhD in physics and holds six patents in the fields of laser spectroscopy and optical communications.
Creating Effective Presentation Slides
Date: Monday 30 March 2020
Time: 1:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Open to those with a paid registration badge.
No advance registration is required. However, seating is limited and will be granted on a first-come, first-served basis.


Most slides out there are ineffective, detracting from what presenters are saying instead of enhancing their presentations. This workshop discusses how to design and construct more effective slides for research presentations, and how to handle them well. As such, it complements the morning workshop on Structuring and Delivering Research Talks. Attend both and fully transform your next presentation.

Learning Outcomes
This workshop will enable you to:
• design slides that get the message across
• construct slides that do not distract from the talk
• handle slides optimally during the presentation

Intended Audience
This workshop is intended for anyone who must prepare and deliver research presentations. Both novice and experienced speakers can expect to gain a lot from it.

Instructor

Jean-luc Doumont runs lectures and workshops in research communication, critical thinking, and related topics for engineers, scientists, and other rational minds. He is an engineer from the University of Louvain and a doctor in applied physics from Stanford University. Articulate, entertaining, and thought-provoking, he is a popular invited speaker at top-notch universities and research centers worldwide.
Designing Your Own Career Path
Date: Monday 30 March 2020
Time: 1:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Open to those with a paid registration badge.
No advance registration is required. However, seating is limited and will be granted on a first-come, first-served basis.


Many students pursue STEM degrees because they excel in the subject matter, but often have little idea exactly what career paths they may ultimately pursue. Engineers typically imagine becoming a design engineer at a large and well-known engineering company, and scientists often imagine becoming a research professor. Relatively few of these “traditional” career options are available, however, and few graduates have the tools or the training to design a career path to any other destination. This workshop will give participants five clear steps to design a career path that will be both rewarding and exciting.

The workshop will start with an overview of the five most important ways that working in industry is different than the academic research environment STEM graduate students are trained in. Next, we will cover five habits that scientists and engineers who are successful in industry learn quickly. We will also cover some basics of company finance, how projects are managed in industry, and some tricks for keeping your projects on schedule.

Learning Outcomes
After completing this workshop, attendees will be able to
• list the five key steps to designing their own rewarding career path in the private sector
• evaluate their own strengths in terms of their skills, their knowledge, and most importantly, their attributes
• explain a corporate financial statement and point out where engineering/R&D fits into the profit model
• follow three steps to defining their career target and utilize several new ways to research this target
• understand how to navigate the hidden job market to find that opportunity that fits them well

Intended Audience
This workshop is intended for graduate and undergraduate students in science and engineering programs who are planning to pursue careers in the private sector. Scientists and engineers who are already working in industry but find themselves unsure where to take the next step in their careers will also find this workshop very helpful.

Instructor

David M. Giltner is the author of the book Turning Science into Things People Need, and is an internationally recognized speaker and mentor for early career scientists and engineers seeking careers in industry. He has spent the last 20 years commercializing photonics technologies in a variety of roles for several companies including JDS Uniphase and Ball Aerospace. Through his time in the private sector, David learned how to function well in both highly technical and business circles, and has often functioned as an interpreter to help these two words communicate more productively. David has a BS and PhD in physics and holds six patents in the fields of laser spectroscopy and optical communications.
LinkedIn Edit-a-thon
Date: Monday 30 March 2020
Time: 5:00 PM - 6:00 PM
Open to those with a paid registration badge.
No advance registration is required. However, seating is limited and will be granted on a first-come, first-served basis.


LinkedIn is a great tool, but it is just that – a tool. Like any tool, it only works for you if you know how to use it. Most early career scientists and engineers realize they need a good LinkedIn profile, but many don’t know what makes a good profile. This Editathon will provide participants an opportunity to revise their profiles with an experienced industry hiring manager to provide input on best practices and what a hiring manager is likely to notice and find relevant.

Learning Outcomes:
Participants attending the Editathon will have one hour to work on their LinkedIn profile. The instructor will briefly outline a few best practices and a summary of what industry hiring managers may be looking for.

Intended Audience
This workshop is intended primarily for early career scientists and engineers who want to improve their LinkedIn profiles and make them more attractive to potential private sector employers. However, scientists and engineers who are further into their careers but have little experience with LinkedIn may also find it valuable.

Instructor

David M. Giltner is the author of the book Turning Science into Things People Need, and is an internationally recognized speaker and mentor for early career scientists and engineers seeking careers in industry. He has spent the last 20 years commercializing photonics technologies in a variety of roles for several companies including JDS Uniphase and Ball Aerospace. Through his time in the private sector, David learned how to function well in both highly technical and business circles, and has often functioned as an interpreter to help these two words communicate more productively. David has a BS and PhD in physics and holds six patents in the fields of laser spectroscopy and optical communications.
Writing Effective Research Abstracts
Date: Tuesday 31 March 2020
Time: 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Open to those with a paid registration badge.
No advance registration is required. However, seating is limited and will be granted on a first-come, first-served basis.


Telling a convincing research story in about 200 words to a potentially diverse audience is by far the most challenging writing task for researchers. This workshops discusses how to structure and write effective abstracts for papers, dissertations, or research reports, in order to make the audience care and to get the message across.

Learning Outcomes
This workshop will enable you to:
• select what to include in an abstract—and what to leave out
• organize your research story into a meaningful sequence
• express your ideas clearly, accurately, and concisely

Intended Audience
This workshop is intended for anyone who must write research abstracts or any other summary of work done. Both novice and experienced authors can expect to gain a lot from it.

Instructor

Jean-luc Doumont runs lectures and workshops in research communication, critical thinking, and related topics for engineers, scientists, and other rational minds. He is an engineer from the University of Louvain and a doctor in applied physics from Stanford University. Articulate, entertaining, and thought-provoking, he is a popular invited speaker at top-notch universities and research centers worldwide.
Telling Better Stories with the Same Facts
Date: Tuesday 31 March 2020
Time: 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Open to those with a paid registration badge.
No advance registration is required. However, seating is limited and will be granted on a first-come, first-served basis.


Many early career scientists and engineers are good at describing their accomplishments to someone in an academic setting who understands their research. Making their dissertation research sound appealing to someone who doesn’t have a similar background, such as an industry hiring manager, is much more challenging. This can be a particular problem in a job interview. If the candidate launches into a description of their work the way they would at an academic conference, the interviewer is likely to not understand how the candidate’s experience is applicable to the company.

This workshop is primarily aimed at helping the participants perform better in a job interview, but it will also help their career in a much broader sense, improving their communication with anyone who is not an expert in their specific discipline or work area.

Learning Outcomes
After completing this workshop, attendees will be able to
• describe their dissertation research in a way that makes them sound less like an academic and more like someone who can contribute to an industry team
• relay why telling stories is so much better for interviewing than simply listing skills and experience
• list five story elements that will make their experience much more relatable to an industry hiring manager
• answer the common question ‘So, what do you do” in a way that creates career opportunities rather than just small talk
• outline a simple way to ensure that their career stories are interesting, rather than boring or confusing

Intended Audience
This workshop is intended for PhD level scientists and engineers who are unsure how to make their dissertation research sound relevant to a hiring manager at a company that is not involved in the same area of research.

Instructor

David M. Giltner is the author of the book Turning Science into Things People Need, and is an internationally recognized speaker and mentor for early career scientists and engineers seeking careers in industry. He has spent the last 20 years commercializing photonics technologies in a variety of roles for several companies including JDS Uniphase and Ball Aerospace. Through his time in the private sector, David learned how to function well in both highly technical and business circles, and has often functioned as an interpreter to help these two words communicate more productively. David has a BS and PhD in physics and holds six patents in the fields of laser spectroscopy and optical communications.
Conveying Messages with Graphs
Date: Tuesday 31 March 2020
Time: 1:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Open to those with a paid registration badge.
No advance registration is required. However, seating is limited and will be granted on a first-come, first-served basis.


Widely used in research and development to analyze and communicate data, graphical displays are still poorly mastered by researchers (and popular software does not helps). This workshop discusses how to create more effective graphs—graphs that are truly visual, are truthful to the data, and get the message across.

Learning Outcomes
This workshop will enable you to:
• select the right graph for a given data set and a given research question
• optimize this graph to make it intuitive and to reveal the data
• phrase a caption that gets the message across

Intended Audience
This workshop is intended for anyone who must create graphs for papers, presentations, or posters. Both novice and experienced authors/speakers can expect to gain a lot from it.

Instructor

Jean-luc Doumont runs lectures and workshops in research communication, critical thinking, and related topics for engineers, scientists, and other rational minds. He is an engineer from the University of Louvain and a doctor in applied physics from Stanford University. Articulate, entertaining, and thought-provoking, he is a popular invited speaker at top-notch universities and research centers worldwide.
Reporting on Your Work Persuasively and Efficiently
Date: Tuesday 31 March 2020
Time: 1:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Open to those with a paid registration badge.
No advance registration is required. However, seating is limited and will be granted on a first-come, first-served basis.


This workshop will help applied scientists and engineers cut down the time they spend reporting on the solutions they’ve proposed, designed, implemented, or evaluated, while making their reports – whether written or oral – more convincing and readable.

Learning Outcomes
This workshop will enable you to:
• create a clear technical argument using a simple formula
• tailor your report to the audience in question
• speed up the writing process by outlining and getting feedback before you start

Intended Audience
This workshop should help any engineer, applied scientist, or consultant or other researcher who needs to communicate the pros and cons of solutions to a technical problem. It is particularly helpful for students and young professionals who have projects and theses on the horizon, and for mid-career professionals looking to move up to positions where they have to pitch and report for their company or team.

Instructor

Sunny Bains is a scientist, journalist, and Principal Teaching Fellow at University College London, where she teaches research, analysis, and communication to students across the physical sciences and engineering. She is author of Explaining the Future: How to Research, Analyze, and Report on Emerging Technologies (Oxford University Press, 2019) and won the UCL Provost’s Teaching Award in 2016. She has degrees in physics, journalism, and physical computation in artificial intelligence and is currently researching a book on neuromorphic engineering.
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