Space-based astronomy is in a time of transition: We are headed toward an era of major new space-based and ground-based observatories that will revolutionize our view of the cosmos and advance discoveries in many fields. At the same time, small satellites and new launch vehicles are providing new capabilities for science and technology development. Organizations in the U.S., Canada, and Europe have been charting plans for the coming decade and beyond. Discoveries in exoplanetary astronomy are coming at a rapid pace, though truly daunting technical challenges remain on the road to characterization of rocky worlds perhaps like our own. Wide area surveys are mapping the sky with extraordinary precision, on scales from the solar neighborhood to the expansion of the entire universe, and providing new time domain views of a dynamic cosmos. Advanced and interdisciplinary technologies, sophisticated systems engineering, and daring scientific ambitions have been brought together to inform detailed planning of potential future space observatories.

The Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2022 conference will explore the current and foreseeable state-of-the-art of space telescope and instrumentation programs, concepts and technologies from the near-ultraviolet and visible wavelengths through the infrared and millimeter regions.

We are soliciting contributions that will create a rich program to stimulate productive discussions in this transitional time. We particularly encourage early career professionals and students to submit papers for oral presentations.

For this Conference, we invite status reports on space projects of all sizes, the science questions that they address, and the technologies and approaches needed to achieve these goals, including but not limited to topics such as: We look forward to participation from across the world, reflecting the truly global nature of our field. Please note that large programs in study and development phases (e.g. LISA, Euclid, Roman, PLATO, ARIEL) will each be allocated a contiguous block of oral presentation time to include a summary presentation to encompass an overall update on each project, followed by brief presentations to highlight specific aspects. The project teams are encouraged to work together in preparing material for these presentations, in engaging a broad range of team members in these presentations, and to submit papers for poster sessions on further work related to these projects. We invite presentations on the JWST mission, while noting that the planned launch and commissioning schedule makes it difficult to predict to what extent it will be practical to present JWST in-flight data at the time of this conference. We hope to include presentations of initial performances with JWST if possible. ;
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Conference

Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2022: Optical, Infrared, and Millimeter Wave

This conference has an open call for papers:
Manuscript Due: 22 June 2022
Space-based astronomy is in a time of transition: We are headed toward an era of major new space-based and ground-based observatories that will revolutionize our view of the cosmos and advance discoveries in many fields. At the same time, small satellites and new launch vehicles are providing new capabilities for science and technology development. Organizations in the U.S., Canada, and Europe have been charting plans for the coming decade and beyond. Discoveries in exoplanetary astronomy are coming at a rapid pace, though truly daunting technical challenges remain on the road to characterization of rocky worlds perhaps like our own. Wide area surveys are mapping the sky with extraordinary precision, on scales from the solar neighborhood to the expansion of the entire universe, and providing new time domain views of a dynamic cosmos. Advanced and interdisciplinary technologies, sophisticated systems engineering, and daring scientific ambitions have been brought together to inform detailed planning of potential future space observatories.

The Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2022 conference will explore the current and foreseeable state-of-the-art of space telescope and instrumentation programs, concepts and technologies from the near-ultraviolet and visible wavelengths through the infrared and millimeter regions.

We are soliciting contributions that will create a rich program to stimulate productive discussions in this transitional time. We particularly encourage early career professionals and students to submit papers for oral presentations.

For this Conference, we invite status reports on space projects of all sizes, the science questions that they address, and the technologies and approaches needed to achieve these goals, including but not limited to topics such as:
  • Science cases for space-based astronomy and astrophysics
    • capabilities for exoplanet detection, including high contrast imaging, transit methods, and astrometry
    • the formation and evolution of galaxies, stars, and planets
    • approaches to increasing insight into dark matter and dark energy from space
    • time-domain and wide-area surveys.
  • Space astronomy missions at all scales and project stages
    • projects currently in development or study phases
    • achievements and lessons from operational or completed missions
    • highly innovative space telescope and instrument concepts
    • small mission concepts and technologies.
  • Enabling technologies and practices
    • system modeling of telescopes and space observatories
    • innovative real-time metrology and wavefront sensing and control
    • interferometric instruments
    • innovative optical designs
    • extreme stability and dynamic isolation
    • in-space servicing, assembly, deployment of optical systems
    • interdisciplinary approaches to space astronomy applications
    • other emerging technologies and new capabilities.
  • Increasing the pipeline of instrumentalists and technologists
  • Sustainability of space astronomy in an era of highly ambitious and challenging missions.
We look forward to participation from across the world, reflecting the truly global nature of our field. Please note that large programs in study and development phases (e.g. LISA, Euclid, Roman, PLATO, ARIEL) will each be allocated a contiguous block of oral presentation time to include a summary presentation to encompass an overall update on each project, followed by brief presentations to highlight specific aspects. The project teams are encouraged to work together in preparing material for these presentations, in engaging a broad range of team members in these presentations, and to submit papers for poster sessions on further work related to these projects. We invite presentations on the JWST mission, while noting that the planned launch and commissioning schedule makes it difficult to predict to what extent it will be practical to present JWST in-flight data at the time of this conference. We hope to include presentations of initial performances with JWST if possible.
Conference Chair
Ball Aerospace (United States)
Conference Chair
Space Telescope Science Institute (United States)
Program Committee
The Royal Observatory, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)
Program Committee
Patricia T. Boyd
NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Program Committee
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
Program Committee
Giovanni G. Fazio
Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
Program Committee
Western Univ. (Canada)
Program Committee
Cardiff Univ. (United Kingdom)
Program Committee
NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Program Committee
Astrid Heske
European Space Research and Technology Ctr. (Netherlands)
Program Committee
European Space Research and Technology Ctr. (Netherlands)
Program Committee
Lab. d'Etudes Spatiales et d'Instrumentation en Astrophysique (France)
Program Committee
Reviresco LLC (United States)
Program Committee
Elisa V. Quintana
NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Program Committee
The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)
Program Committee
Cornell Univ. (United States)
Program Committee
Motohide Tamura
National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (Japan)
Program Committee
Giovanna Tinetti
Univ. College London (United Kingdom)
Program Committee
UK Astronomy Technology Ctr. (United Kingdom)