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Electronic Imaging & Signal Processing

Astronomers release the largest color image of the sky ever made

R&D Magazine
18 January 2011

On January 18, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III (SDSS-III) released the largest digital color image of the sky ever made, and it's free to all. The image has been put together over the last decade from millions of 2.8-megapixel images, thus creating a color image of more than a trillion pixels. This terapixel image is so big and detailed that one would need 500,000 high-definition TVs to view it at its full resolution.

This new SDSS-III data release, along with the previous data releases that it builds upon, gives astronomers the most comprehensive view of the night sky ever made. SDSS data have already been used to discover nearly half a billion astronomical objects, including asteroids, stars, galaxies and distant quasars.

Data Release Eight (DR8) can be found at www.sdss3.org/dr8.

Full story from R&D Magazine